7.5/10
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318 user 73 critic

Buffalo '66 (1998)

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After being released from prison, Billy is set to visit his parents with his wife, whom he does not actually have. This provokes Billy to act out, as he kidnaps a girl and forces her to act as his wife for the visit.

Director:

Vincent Gallo

Writers:

Vincent Gallo (original story), Vincent Gallo (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Popularity
4,712 ( 415)
6 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Vincent Gallo ... Billy Brown
Christina Ricci ... Layla
Ben Gazzara ... Jimmy Brown
Mickey Rourke ... The Bookie
Rosanna Arquette ... Wendy Balsam
Jan-Michael Vincent ... Sonny
Anjelica Huston ... Jan Brown
Kevin Pollak ... TV Sportscaster
Alex Karras ... TV Sportscaster
John Sansone John Sansone ... Little Billy
Manny Fried Manny Fried ... The Donut Clerk
John Rummel John Rummel ... Don Shanks
Bob Wahl Bob Wahl ... Scott Woods
Penny Wolfgang Penny Wolfgang ... The Judge
Anthony Mydcarz Anthony Mydcarz ... The Motel Clerk
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Storyline

Billy is released after five years in prison. In the next moment, he kidnaps teenage student Layla and visits his parents with her, pretending she is his girlfriend and they will soon marry (and forcing her to say the same). Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Billy Brown just got out of jail. Now he's going to serve some real time. He's going home.

Genres:

Comedy | Crime | Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, strong violent images and scenes involving nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA | Canada

Language:

English

Release Date:

26 June 1998 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Bafalo '66 See more »

Filming Locations:

Buffalo, New York, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$39,555, 28 June 1998, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$2,375,097
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Ben Gazzara ad-libbed the part where he shoves his face between Christina Ricci's breasts at the dinner table. See more »

Goofs

In the bowling alley scene when Billy ask Layla "What's so funny?", the boom mic shadow is visible on the ceiling behind his head when the camera pulls back. See more »

Quotes

Billy Brown: I don't believe them!
Layla: No, Billy it's good... you know it's good if they like me, then they will be proud of you.
Billy Brown: Bullshit... my life is shit.
Layla: If you were my son,i-iii would be really proud of you.
Billy Brown: Did you see them kiss your ass? You made it happen, you made them do it.
Layla: (sighs) You kidnapped me... you pulled my hair, you threatened me. I just went in there in and did you a favor and I thought I did a good job. And...
Billy Brown: And what was that shit about the CIA? I asked you nice, I said nice: MAKE ME ...
See more »

Crazy Credits

Tibi Scheflow credited as working as the "Fantastic Locations Manager". See more »

Connections

References Edward Scissorhands (1990) See more »

Soundtracks

Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear to Tread)
Written by Johnny Mercer and Rube Bloom
Performed by Vincent Gallo Sr.
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Gallo ditches conventionalism in Buffalo...let's be thankful!
2 November 2008 | by Joey CostanzaSee all my reviews

*** out of **** stars

The only sequence of Buffalo '66 that warmed my heart with thankful relief from almost two hours of wondering why the main character - Billy Brown (Vincent Gallo)- would make such unorthodox decisions against the obvious, right decisions, was during the last five minutes (approx.) of the film. What a pay off! What a tension breaking five minutes it was! I felt I could breathe easy after happily discovering that Billy is a man that can make loving, almost predictable and sane decisions after all, and all because of Layla (Christina Ricci), the new angel in his life, who he haphazardly "kidnapped" in a dance studio; who he finally realizes is his savior. We never find out much about Layla, if anything at all. Where does she come from and why is she the way she is? Why does she see a loving light in despicable Billy? Why doesn't she leave him, after so much verbal abuse and selfishness? I believe the reason she doesn't is because director, writer, composer and actor Gallo understands that in most scripts out of cliché Hollywood, she WOULD leave Billy. And then what kind of movie would we have? One that we've seen time and time again. The decisions that the characters make in Buffalo '66's entire time frame are the antithesis of conventionalism.

What makes Billy Brown tick is strenuously simple, but only after a fair amount of contemplation after spending time with him: his parents, played by Ben Gazzara and Anjelica Huston, have systematically not given their son an ounce of validation of pride or yes, love, for his entire life, spent in frigid Buffalo, New York. Billy has spent his whole life excessively fabricating his importance in hope to gain that validation, but never with any success. Whether biological parents can demonstrate such intense apathy and coldness toward their own flesh and blood, as seen in this movie, is up for debate. But if they were able to be so callously and blindly bold, the bitter and sad result of such a man as Billy seems plausible. Gallo's skillful acting ability in his role floors me, because we actually somehow care for Billy. And why should we? Because through his sin we envision humanness that, I believe, we can all relate to: the errors we make; the lack of self-worth we may feel; loneliness; rejection; and the pain that is inflicted upon us from those who are supposed to unconditionally love us the most. Ricci's astounding performance, which I believe carries the most improvisation of any character in the film, brilliantly sheds the most light on the movie's message, which is: when someone cares about you more than themselves, it can truly change you for the better, no matter how much emotional baggage you may have. If we all had a Layla in our lives, psychiatrists would go into extinction.


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