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Cannes: Jeff Bridges' 'Living in Future's Past' Doc Finds U.S. Home

Cannes: Jeff Bridges' 'Living in Future's Past' Doc Finds U.S. Home
The documentary Living in the Future’s Past, produced and narrated by Oscar winner Jeff Bridges, has landed a domestic distributor.

Trafalgar Releasing has inked a deal with Vision Films for the North American theatrical release of the film, in which Bridges explores “who we are, where we come from, how we think and why we do the things we do.” Trafalgar will also release in the U.K.

Living in the Future’s Past sees The Big Lebowski star share the screen with scientists, thinkers, a former Nato chief and several authors to reveal “profound concepts about ourselves and our future in...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Horror Movie Vinyl Cover Art Preview from Ghoulish: The Art Of Gary Pullin

Creating new ways to look at horror movies both beloved and lesser-known has been artist "Ghoulish" Gary Pullin's specialty for over ten years via awe-inspiring posters, and he brings that same innovative and nostalgic style to his artwork for the vinyl scores of fright flicks. With Pullin's new retrospective book hitting shelves in hardcover from 1984 Publishing, we've been provided with a special look at some of Pullin's most impressive LP cover artwork that's displayed within the eye-grabbing pages of Ghoulish: The Art of Gary Pullin.

"For more than ten years artist Gary Pullin has been taking art galleries, movie theater walls, and social media by storm with his fresh, inventive takes on film, music, and television properties. Equal parts nightmare and nostalgia, his instantly recognizable style always strikes a chord with fans, and his coveted and acclaimed pieces sell out in lightning speed.

A go-to artist for official film artwork,
See full article at DailyDead »

Steve Buscemi and Alexandre Rockwell Revisit ‘In the Soup,’ the Sundance Hit That Left Its Director Struggling For a Purpose

Steve Buscemi and Alexandre Rockwell Revisit ‘In the Soup,’ the Sundance Hit That Left Its Director Struggling For a Purpose
Among the many American independent films made in the ‘90s, few reflect the climate better than “In the Soup.” Director Alexandre Rockwell’s black-and-white comedy, which won the Grand Jury Prize at the 1992 Sundance Film Festival, follows wannabe New York filmmaker Adolpho Rolo (a young Steve Buscemi) as he attempts to turn his 500-page screenplay into a movie starring his next-door neighbor Angelica (Jennifer Beals). Adolpho’s ambitions are exploited by the mysterious Joe (Seymour Cassel in one of his most endearing performances). The alternately charming and confrontational cigar-chomping raconteur proclaims his desire to produce Adolpho’s movie, while forcing him into a series of strange criminal antics, as Adolpho’s project drifts further away from his original intentions.

The scrappy movie resembles the indie-filmmaking energy at the time — not for nothing does Jim Jarmusch make a cameo — and remains a charming statement on the conflict between artistic passion and
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Ebertfest at 20: Roger Ebert’s Film Festival Keeps the Beloved Critic’s Passions Alive

Ebertfest at 20: Roger Ebert’s Film Festival Keeps the Beloved Critic’s Passions Alive
The Ebert name is starting to move in new directions, but after 20 years, Ebertfest remains largely the same. Roger Ebert’s annual film festival, held in his hometown of Champaign, Illinois, threw a cake-and-ice-cream party for its anniversary edition but otherwise stuck to programming a familiar mix of fare the beloved film critic championed during his life and newer work chosen for its similarities to films and themes he had embraced in the past. This year, the newer selections included “13th,” “Interstellar” and “Columbus,” while choices from the Ebert vault included “American Splendor,” “Rambling Rose” and opening-night selection “The Fugitive.”

Meanwhile, Chaz Ebert, Roger’s widow and co-founder and chair of the Roger and Chaz Ebert Foundation, plans moves into film production and broader social action. She announced during the festival that she would be co-producing a biopic of Sojourner Truth, to be helmed by Lateef “Cal” Calloway, who previously
See full article at Indiewire »

O The Choices I Have! A 2018 Tcmff Preamble

So much time, so few movies to see. Scratch that. Reverse it.

Running a little later than usual this year, the 2018 Turner Classic Movies Film Festival gets under way this coming Thursday, screening approximately 88 films and special programs over the course of the festival’s three-and-a-half days, beginning Thursday evening, and no doubt about it, this year’s schedule, no less than any other year, will lay out a banquet for classic film buffs, casual film fans and harder-core cinephiles looking for the opportunity to see long-time favorites as well as rare and unusual treats on the big screen. I’ve attended every festival since its inaugural run back in 2010, and since then if I have not reined in my enthusiasm for the festival and being given the opportunity to attend it every year, then I have at least managed to lasso my verbiage. That first year I wrote about
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

420 Day: 9 Best Marijuana Moments in Movies, From ‘The Big Lebowski’ to ‘Dazed and Confused’ (Videos)

From Cheech and Chong rocking out in a pot-filled club to The Dude abiding, watch the best marijuana-themed scenes on film.

This nightclub scene from “Up in Smoke” (1978) features Cheech and Chong rocking out to “Earache My Eye” and a roomful of pot smoke.

The Dude crashes his car in “The Big Lebowski” (1998) due to some reckless joint smoking. The beer likely didn’t help either.

The Dude can’t relax with a doobie in the tub. Instead he gets attacked by nihilist-owned ferrets in “The Big Lebowski.”

Review the weed-fueled theory on George Washington’s marijuana use in “Dazed and Confused.” (1993)

“I grew up on Two rivers!” Another fun stoner scene from a Richard Linklater film has college-aged pot smokers testing out telepathy.

Watch Kumar’s extensive weed dream in 2004’s “Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle.”

Two pot aficionados sample what smells like “God’s vagina” in this classic scene from 2008’s “Pineapple Express.”

Arguably Brad Pitt’s most convincing performance ever, Pitt plays a stoner roommate with a bad sense of direction in 1993’s “True Romance.”

A roach is defined in 1998’s “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.”

Read original story 420 Day: 9 Best Marijuana Moments in Movies, From ‘The Big Lebowski’ to ‘Dazed and Confused’ (Videos) At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

F*Bombs - The Disaster Artist (Video)

  • JoBlo
Ever wonder how many F-Bombs are dropped in some of your favorite movies like Pulp Fiction, Superbad, The Devil's Rejects, The Big Lebowski and Reservoir Dogs? Well, JoBlo's got you covered with F*Bombs. Here we count each and every use of the word f*ck in select classic flicks. On this newest episode, we take on director James Franco's The Disaster Artist co-starring Dave Franco,... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

‘You Were Never Really Here’ Film Review: Stylish Psychological Thriller Falls a Bit Short on Substance

‘You Were Never Really Here’ Film Review: Stylish Psychological Thriller Falls a Bit Short on Substance
At this point, the winkingly irreverent shaggy-dog potboiler is as firmly established a genre as the hard-boiled stories it tries to subvert. Robert Altman kicked things off with 1973’s “The Long Goodbye,” his riff on a bewildered Philip Marlowe in the Age of Aquarius, and the Coens later took that baton and ran it up to summit of Cult Film Mountain with “The Big Lebowski,” leaving plenty of imitators trailing behind and inspiring plenty more in the two decades since.

So what’s a 2018 release to do? How can one further twist and turn the hardboiled-detective genre in a world where The Dude reigns and abides?

Scottish director Lynne Ramsay (“We Need to Talk About Kevin”) offers that question her elliptical and brutal answer in “You Were Never Really Here,” a film that presents an unfamiliar spin on this well-known style and does so with equal parts surgical precision and Mack Truck force. Still, for all of its meticulous construction and often masterful craft, the film remains something to coldly admire rather than easily embrace, often playing more as a collection of accomplished filmmaking moments than as a fully enthralling whole.

Also Read: Will Ferrell Calls Joaquin Phoenix a 'Little Bitch' and 8 Other Hilarious Interview Magazine Highlights

Adapting Jonathan Ames’ 2013 novella, that was itself a sideways riff on noir-ish detective fiction, writer-director Ramsay picks up that genre-slanting approach and moves it even further afield. Instead of subverting hard-boiled structure — where a jaded old-timer accepts a seemingly open-and-shut case, only to be ensnared in a wider web of corruption — “You Were Never Really Here” readily adopts it, but tells that recognizable tale with terse abstraction tied to the lead character’s fractured point-of-view.

That is to say, if you’re trying to make sense of the story, which is both clear-cut and oblique, you’re entirely missing the point. It doesn’t matter that hired muscle Joe (Joaquin Phoenix, in leonine bearded majesty) uncovers a wider ring of corruption and pedophilia when sent to rescue the missing daughter of a New York State Senator. What matters is that this hirsute veteran is mentally and physically scarred, that he — our unreliable narrator — suffers from a debilitating case of Ptsd forged from a childhood of abuse and a career witnessing horrors in the military and FBI.

Also Read: Would Joaquin Phoenix Play The Joker? 'It Depends,' He Says

His trauma, and self-obliterating response to said trauma, frames his every waking moment. Under Ramsay and editor Joe Bini’s tightly coiled assembly, those same pathologies also shape the film’s form, so that the narrative content of any given interaction takes a backseat to the anguished mental landscape of the protagonist experiencing it. So really, it makes no difference if Joe is in a drug den or a diner, he lives each instant with the same twinging unease — and so too will the viewer.

(The version of this film currently opening in U.S. theaters is, incidentally, slightly expanded from the one that premiered at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival.)

While other film noir riffs might lob an unconventional cast of characters (as did the Coens) or employ cultural anachronisms (as did Altman) in order to shake things up, here the plot moves through the familiar film-noir motions while using film craft to effectively blur them out. Discordant flashbacks and flash-forwards, cut like synapses firing and set to Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood’s warping, nervous score, become the focal point of any given scene.

Also Read: 'Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot' Film Review: Joaquin Phoenix Shines in Disjointed Drama

Indeed, the film’s jangly, jagged-edge rhythm becomes its very narrative backbone. In that sense, the film is less interested in goofing on the detective genre than it is in undermining the genre itself; Joe could just as well be sleepwalking through a sweeping MGM musical or a light romantic comedy, and he’d experience the situations the same way.

Ramsay runs with that idea, often finding a number of unfamiliar notes to play in a series of otherwise common set-ups. In one standout sequence, after Joe realizes that a man he shot is not yet dead, he offers the expiring man a painkiller, and then gets alongside his victim on the ground. The two men then quietly listen to the pop music playing on the radio while one of them bleeds his life away.

Though such notes of grace make “You Were Never Really Here” stand out, they are few and far between in what is an otherwise grimly violent and willfully oblique tour through one fellow’s harrowed psyche. That the film can so quickly and so effectively establish Joe’s frenzied demons and numbed emotions is an absolute testament to the care and quality of filmmaking at hand. That the film leads you onto such stormy waters so quickly, and then lets the tempest roar without much reprieve for the next 90 minutes, means that for others, such an uncompromising and unvarying approach might offer little beyond the sum of its parts.



Read original story ‘You Were Never Really Here’ Film Review: Stylish Psychological Thriller Falls a Bit Short on Substance At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Breaking Film and TV Industry News — April 3

Tuesday, April 3

Sundance Selects announced that it has acquired U.S. rights to the film “Blaze,” co-written, produced and directed by Ethan Hawke. Sybil Rosen co-wrote the film with Hawke based on her memoir “Living in the Woods in a Tree: Remembering Blaze Foley.” Jake Seal, John Sloss and Ryan Hawke produced alongside Ethan Hawke.

The film held its world premiere at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival where newcomer Ben Dickey won the Special Jury Award for Achievement in Acting for his portrayal of Blaze Foley. The is inspired by the life of Blaze Foley, the unsung songwriting legend of the Texas outlaw music movement that spawned the likes of Merle Haggard and Willie Nelson. The film weaves together three different periods of time, braiding re-imagined versions of Blaze’s past, present and future. The different strands explore his love affair with Sybil Rosen; his final performance in a near-empty honky-tonk; his last,
See full article at Indiewire »

Great Uses of Songs in Movies: “Just Dropped In,” the First Edition in The Big Lebowski

The Big Lewbowski was, more or less, bound to become a cult classic no matter what. The use of Just Dropped In by The First Edition sets the tone pretty well for this sequence that takes place after he meets with Treehorn, the guy who wants Bunny to come back to his stable of adult stars. Treehorn drugs the Dude’s drink and the dream sequence that follows kind of sums up the Dude’s goals in life really as it revolves around bowling and just chilling out as much as possible, with Maude in the picture obviously, at least insofar as

Great Uses of Songs in Movies: “Just Dropped In,” the First Edition in The Big Lebowski
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Bus Party to Hell Trailer Drives Tara Reid Into a Satanic Massacre

Bus Party to Hell Trailer Drives Tara Reid Into a Satanic Massacre
Ever been on a party bus? Sometimes they can literally be Hell. A new movie has arrived to take that conceit into the stratosphere. Today, we have a special look at Bus Party to Hell. And it looks like a satanic blast.

Tara Reid makes her next stop on the road to cult infamy with Bus Party to Hell. Yes, the girl that revived her flailing career with infinite Sharknado sequels is back and ready to party like it's 1999, which is, oddly enough, the year she made her break through in American Pie, before becoming the infamous party girl of Hollywood. Now, she puts all those skills she learned to great use headlining a movie about a satantic trip into the bowels of the dusty desert. There's no looking back after this.

Bus Party to Hell is arriving just in time for your spring break. And for all you cheap-os
See full article at MovieWeb »

Steve Buscemi Discusses ‘Death of Stalin,’ Playing God and Adam Sandler

Steve Buscemi Discusses ‘Death of Stalin,’ Playing God and Adam Sandler
A favorite of directors like the Coen brothers and Quentin Tarantino, Steve Buscemi has proven his range over the years. Few actors could command the small screen as a leading man in Martin Scorsese’s “Boardwalk Empire” then get laughs popping up in an Adam Sandler film.

The actor is busier than ever; he’s currently on screens playing Nikita Khrushchev in “The Death of Stalin,” the so-bizarre-it-has-to-be-true comedy from Armando Iannucci (“Veep,” “In the Loop”) currently burning up the specialty box office. In April, he’ll be seen in Andrew Haigh’s “Lean on Pete” and Sandler’s “The Week Of.” And he’s set to return to television in the TBS comedy “Miracle Workers,” in which he’ll play God.

I hope you take it as a compliment when I say you’re not the first person I would think of to play Nikita Khrushchev, yet you’re so good.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Three Billboards’ Composer Carter Burwell to Headline Ghent Film Festival (Exclusive)

‘Three Billboards’ Composer Carter Burwell to Headline Ghent Film Festival (Exclusive)
American composer Carter Burwell will headline the 18th World Soundtrack Awards with a live concert as part of the Ghent Film Festival, on Oct. 17 in Ghent, Belgium.

Burwell, a recent Oscar nominee for his music for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” will attend; also expected is composer Nicholas Britell, who was named last year’s “Discovery of the Year” at the festival for his music for “Moonlight.”

Dirk Brosse will conduct the Brussels Philharmonic in excerpts from scores by both composers, accompanied by film clips.

Burwell was also Oscar-nominated for his music for “Carol” and won an Emmy for his music for HBO’s “Mildred Pierce,” both of which were Todd Haynes projects. He is perhaps best-known for his music for many Coen Brothers films including “Fargo,” “The Big Lebowski,” “The Hudsucker Proxy,” “True Grit,” many of which are expected to be presented in concert.

Festival artistic director Patrick Duynslaegher
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ranking The Top Five Supporting Characters in “The Big Lebowski”

There are a lot of supporting characters in The Big Lebowski, one of the greatest cult classics ever made, but some of them just don’t make the cut when it comes to who’s ranked as the best. Some of them are just way more memorable than others and some are kind of just there to be there. Every movie has to have some filler and unfortunately actors can be used as filler just as much as a plot or a premise or anything else that needs to be added in to fill a gap in the story would otherwise be

Ranking The Top Five Supporting Characters in “The Big Lebowski
See full article at TVovermind.com »

F*Bombs - Get Out (Video)

  • JoBlo
Ever wonder how many F-Bombs are dropped in some of your favorite movies like Pulp Fiction, Superbad, The Devil's Rejects, The Big Lebowski and Reservoir Dogs? Well, JoBlo's got you covered with F*Bombs. Here we count each and every use of the word f*ck in select classic flicks. On this newest episode, we take on writer-director Jordan Peele's Academy Award-winning horror film Get Out... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

Gringo Review: Charlize Theron Gets Nasty in This Fun Romp

Gringo Review: Charlize Theron Gets Nasty in This Fun Romp
Gringo is a zany, black humor, ensemble comedy akin to The Big Lebowski and Big Trouble. It is the feature film debut from Australian stuntman and actor Nash Edgerton. His better known younger brother, Joel Edgerton, co-stars. To say Gringo has a lot going on is an understatement. The plot is raucously frenetic with multiple characters bumbling around. It gets a bit thick in the weeds, but never fails to be entertaining. I laughed consistently throughout, some bits had me howling. It's a messy, fun ride at a relatively humorless weekend box office.

The fantastic David Oyelowo stars as Harold Soyinka, a genteel everyman who works as a manager at a Chicago pharmaceutical company. The mild-mannered, by the book Harold has a wife (Thandie Newton) spending him into bankruptcy. At work, he has to deal with his obnoxious bosses. Richard Rusk (Joel Edgerton) is the company president, a backstabbing, arrogant egomaniac who shamelessly exploits others.
See full article at MovieWeb »

‘The Big Lebowski’ Turns 20, But Why Are People Still Obsessed with the Coen Brothers’ Super Chill Classic?

  • Indiewire
‘The Big Lebowski’ Turns 20, But Why Are People Still Obsessed with the Coen Brothers’ Super Chill Classic?
On March 6, 1998, a little movie called “The Big Lebowski” opened in half-empty theaters across the country, and anyone expecting the Coen brothers to get serious for their follow-up to the Oscar-winning “Fargo” was in for a very chill surprise. A dopey but profound slacker noir about a guy — a conscientious objector to all human conflict — whose quest to avenge a soiled rug unravels into a wild goose chase involving all sorts of inherent vice, “The Big Lebowski” may not have been much of a hit at the box office, but it took on a life of its own after that.

Propelled by the tao of the Dude and propped up by a wide variety of memorable supporting performances (including Philip Seymour Hoffman as a millionaire’s lackey, John Turturro as a pedophile bowler named Jesus, and John Goodman as a complicated Vietnam vet with a hair-trigger temper), the movie has
See full article at Indiewire »

The Dude Abides: Revisiting the Peculiar Charms of ‘The Big Lebowski’ 20 Years Later

The Dude Abides: Revisiting the Peculiar Charms of ‘The Big Lebowski’ 20 Years Later
The writing-directing duo of Joel and Ethan Coen have surpassed themselves time and again with Academy Award-winning films like Fargo and No Country for Old Men (the latter of which we revisited in a 10th-anniversary feature last October). On Sunday night, their longtime collaborator, Roger Deakins, finally won a long overdue Oscar for his cinematography. However, […]

The post The Dude Abides: Revisiting the Peculiar Charms of ‘The Big Lebowski’ 20 Years Later appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

The Cast of 'Big Lebowski,' Then and Now

The Cast of 'Big Lebowski,' Then and Now
The Coen brothers’ cult classic The Big Lebowski turns 20 years old on March 6, 2018.

Below, The Hollywood Reporter remembers the comedy film and takes a look at where the actors are now.

To celebrate its anniversary, The Big Lebowski will be returning to more than 600 theaters nationwide on Aug. 5 and 8 via Fathom Events' Turner Classic Movies Big Screen Classics series. More details can be found here.

...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Dude Abides! The Big Lebowski Turns 20

  • Cineplex
The Dude Abides! The Big Lebowski Turns 20The Dude Abides! The Big Lebowski Turns 20Kurt Anthony3/6/2018 10:18:00 Am

Dude! It’s the 20th anniversary of The Big Lebowski!

Written and directed by the Joel and Ethan Coen (Fargo), The Big Lebowski blazed its way into theatres on March 6, 1998 after its premiere at the 1998 Sundance Film Festival. Shot on a budget of $15M, the classic stoner flick was originally considered a box office failure, but has since risen to the top of the crime comedy heap. It was even added to the U.S. National Film Registry, man!

Starring Jeff Bridges as The Dude, the Coen Brothers classic also hosts a killer supporting cast. Everyone from John Goodman, Steve Buscemi, Julianne Moore, and even the late Phillip Seymour Hoffman spark up hilarious performances over the course of a hopelessly convoluted plot. They really tie the film together, you know?

Well,
See full article at Cineplex »
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