In the Mood for Love (2000) - News Poster

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11 Actors and Directors Share the Films That Define Them, From Barry Jenkins to Jessica Chastain, Jonah Hill, and More

FilmStruck, the streaming platform from Turner Classic Movies that specializes in arthouse and foreign films, has started a viral movement on social media with the #FilmStruck4 challenge. The company posted to its official Twitter page on April 17 an announcement asking people to share the four films that define them. The challenge quickly grew to include some of the best actors and directors working today, from Guillermo del Toro to Jessica Chastain, Barry Jenkins, Zoe Kazan, Edgar Wright, and more.

Del Toro had a hard time narrowing down his picks to just four, so he posted two separate posts with the eight films that define him. Fans of the director won’t be surprised to see Jean Cocteau’s “Beauty and the Beast” and Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” included among his choices. Jessica Chastain split her list into two, one for performances that define her and one for movies.
See full article at Indiewire »

East Asia Film Festival Ireland will run 5-8 April 2018 featuring exclusive Masterclass and post-screening Q&As with internationally-acclaimed cinematographer Mark Lee Ping-bing.

For its second edition, the East Asia Film Festival Ireland (previously the Chinese language Film Festival Ireland) celebrates the diversity, artistry and variety of films from East and South East Asia. Over four days, the festival will feature a compelling range of films from China, Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan.

We are honoured to welcome the great Taiwanese cinematographer Mark Lee Ping-Bing as our guest in Dublin. A long-time collaborator with director Hou Hsiao-Hsien, he has also worked with many renowned directors including Wong Kar-Wai, Tian Zhuangzhuang, Tran Anh Hung, Ann Hui and Sylvia Chang.

The festival will feature the work of Mark Lee Ping-bing with rare screenings of five films spanning Mark Lee’s career, as well as an exclusive masterclass and post-screening Q&As.

Commenting on this year’s programme, Festival Artistic & Programme Director Marie-Pierre Richard said, ‘We are delighted to welcome our guest of honour Mark Lee Ping-Bing,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

FilMart: Aaron Kwok, Tony Leung Together For First Time in Mei Ah’s ‘Ambitions’

Two of Hong Kong’s biggest stars will appear together for the first time in “Theory of Ambitions,” a big-budget action film from Mei Ah Entertainment Group.

Aaron Kwok (“Cold War”) and Tony Leung Chiu-wai (“The Grandmasters,” “In the Mood for Love”) will play the roles of two top cops in the $38 million production directed by Philip Yung (“Port of Call”). Set in the early 1960s Hong Kong and based on true stories, the film follows the rivalries of two ambitious Chinese cops who rose to the top of the ladder during colonial times.

Speaking at FilMart on Monday, Kwok said the film brought him and Leung together for the first time since the two had a brief encounter while they were working at Tvb. Kwok said he was working on sit-com “Everybody’s Somebody’s Favourite” in 1988, and that Leung appeared as a guest star, in a single scene.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Monster Hunt 2’ Showcases China’s Improvements – and Ambitions – in Animation

‘Monster Hunt 2’ Showcases China’s Improvements – and Ambitions – in Animation
“Chinese animation is making great progress,” declared Raman Hui, director of “Monster Hunt 2,” the smash-hit hybrid of live action and animation that played in a Special Gala screening Sunday at the Berlinale.

Hui’s is no empty boast: His family-oriented adventure film has just taken in $190 million in three days at the Chinese box office over the lunar new year holiday.

Monster Hunt 2” is the latest and highest-profile example of China’s leap forward in the animation business. Also over the holiday weekend, the fifth Boonie Bears movie, “Boonie Bears: The Big Shrink,” earned $40 million; Netflix has just picked up rights to the franchise’s third installment. And China’s Light Chaser Animation is making a series of increasingly high-quality 3D animations.

Hui spent his early career in Hollywood and was co-creator of “Shrek.” Speaking to Variety at the Berlin Film Festival, he said the improving Chinese animation industry allowed an increase in quantity and quality
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Berlin Film Review: ‘Monster Hunt 2’

Berlin Film Review: ‘Monster Hunt 2’
“Don’t think too much!” are the very first words in Raman Hui’s new Chinese-language, live-action/CG hybrid family adventure. And you’ve scarcely had time to wonder if that might be a cynical advance apologia for a potentially shoddy sequel to a wildly popular original, before you find yourself obeying. “Monster Hunt 2” is so perfectly good-natured and so utterly nonsensical that it makes not-thinking-about-it basically an act of self-preservation, for which, bless its bouncing, gurgling, flolloping heart. Before the brief Bollywood musical-style opening has even concluded, with the brightly clad dancers joyously wriggling out of their “human outfits” to reveal the tubby, blubbery, sunny-dispositioned “monsters” they are underneath, the only part of the viewer’s brain that would light up a Ct scan is the Awww! cortex. These creatures are adorable.

Most adorable of all is the film’s star, Wuba. A pudgy little cross between Baby Groot, a Porg, and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Best Movies Without Academy Award Nominations of the 21st Century, From ‘Wonder Woman’ to ‘Zodiac’

  • Indiewire
The Best Movies Without Academy Award Nominations of the 21st Century, From ‘Wonder Woman’ to ‘Zodiac’
You know what’s even more satisfying than your favorite movie cleaning up on Oscar night? The righteous indignation that comes from knowing that Academy members were too busy nominating Meryl Streep again to throw a bone to works of high art like “Under the Skin” or “In the Mood for Love.” One of the most important traditions during awards season is getting angry and/or surprised by which movies were snubbed, of which there are more than a few — for every “Shape of Water” with 13 nominations, there’s a “Zodiac” with zero.

And so it is that we’ve assembled this look at 25 great movies that went entirely unrecognized by AMPAS, some of which are unsurprising (they don’t often give much love to wrenching Korean dramas, after all) but unjust all the same. Have a look, and try to quell your outrage as you’re reminded that, seriously,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Monster Hunt 2’ Earns Biggest Opening Day in China

‘Monster Hunt 2’ Earns Biggest Opening Day in China
China’s “Monster Hunt 2,” a hybrid live action and CGI fantasy from the co-creator of “Shrek,” romped into the record books on its opening day Friday, which coincided with the start of the Chinese New Year holiday.

By 10 p.m. local time Friday, the film had grossed $95.7 million (RMB603 million), according to provisional data from China Box Office. That eclipses the previous first-day record in China, which was set last year by “Wolf Warrior 2.”

Monster Hunt 2’s” earnings on Friday accounted for 44% of the market, ahead of “Detective Chinatown 2” in second place. “Detective Chinatown 2” had scored $56 million (RMB359 million) by 8 p.m.

Berlin Film Festival-goers and foreign distributors will get a chance to see the Raman Hui-directed “Monster Hunt 2” for themselves this weekend. It plays on Sunday in an out-of-competition special screening.

Chinese New Year (aka Spring Festival) is one of the two peak times for cinema attendance in China
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Wong Kar-wai Set as Beijing Festival Jury President

Wong Kar-wai Set as Beijing Festival Jury President
Iconic Hong Kong-based director Wong Kar-wai has been set as president of the jury for the competition section at the upcoming Beijing International Film Festival. Now in its eighth edition, the festival runs April 15-22, 2018.

Wong, who was born and studied in mainland China, but established his film career in Hong Kong previously won the competition’s Tiantan award with “The Grandmaster.” He has directord films including “In The Mood for Love” and “Chungking Express” which have become emblematic of a lush-style of yesteryear, Chinese-language, art house movies, as well as visual identities for Hong Kong.

The festival is backed by Beijing city authorities and other government departments. A couple of years back there were moves to cease operating competitive sections in China’s major film festivals, but local pressure may have prevailed as having an international competition, however dated or marginal film the selection, is seen as adding prestige to an event.

Through his Hong
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cry Me a River: The Radical and Revolutionary Power of Melodrama

Within the first ten minutes of Nicholas Ray’s unimpeachable classic Rebel Without a Cause Jim Stark (James Dean) wails, “You’re tearing me apart!!!!!” This is not an instance where the film crescendos with an emotional breakdown, but begins. Jim Stark is a staggering portrait of apocalyptic masculine adolescence ripping apart a young body through expectations put on him by society and his own self-imposed fears that he could turn into his passive father. Jim Stark is one of the defining characters of cinematic melodrama with his unbridled emotional honesty laid bare for the world to see. He physically cannot keep himself from gnashing, wailing, and screaming in the face of emotions that bubble to the surface. Melodrama opens the lid on these reactions and rides that feeling to cinematic honesty and authenticity. Melodrama is realer than real; a hyper-stylized evocation of feelings that we’re all familiar with as human beings.
See full article at The Film Stage »

NYC Weekend Watch: International Melodrama, ‘L’eclisse’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

If you’re emotionally prepared, the massive 62-film series “Emotion Pictures: International Melodrama” has begun featuring In the Mood for Love, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, Letter from an Unknown Woman, The Housemaid, and more this weekend.

Museum of Modern Art

An all-inclusive Michelangelo Antonioni retrospective is still underway.

Metrograph

“Goth
See full article at The Film Stage »

“Who talks of realism here?”: Seijun Suzuki’s Taisho Trilogy

  • MUBI
Mubi is showing Seijun Suzuki's Taisho Trilogy from November 13 - December 27, 2017 in the United States and United Kingdom.In a now-famous quote from a 1997 video interview, the late Japanese filmmaker Seijun Suzuki paraphrases Nikkatsu Studio executives when he declares, "I make movies that make no sense and make no money.” The quip is put forth in the context of 1967’sBranded to Kill, the pop-influenced noir that arguably stands as the artistic pinnacle of Suzuki’s career as a filmmaker of yakuza, gangster, and proto-pink films with Nikkatsu. While others have contested Suzuki’s claims that his nonsensical and unbankable output lead to the fissure between the filmmaker and Nikkatsu—pointing instead to the drain he and his dedicated coterie of assistant directors placed on the studio—Branded to Kill was the cap to a prodigious run of no less than two features a year from 1956 through 1966, and Suzuki's his
See full article at MUBI »

In the Mood for Interaction: Wong Kar-wai’s Intersections

By Jacob Oller

The Hong Kong Second Wave filmmaker loves synchronicity. he films of Wong Kar-wai, specifically In the Mood for Love, are vivid portraits of desire (and often, the desire Of desire). In the Mood for Love specifically embodies this through a lyrical visual storytelling technique that creates a feeling of interfilm interaction between shots and components. […]

The article In the Mood for Interaction: Wong Kar-wai’s Intersections appeared first on Film School Rejects.
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Lust, Love and Longing: How a Hong Kong Photographer Captured Wong Kar-wai’s Cinematic Mood

Lust, Love and Longing: How a Hong Kong Photographer Captured Wong Kar-wai’s Cinematic Mood
A suited Tony Leung embracing Maggie Cheung, eyes closed and wearing that impeccably fitted floral qipao — it’s the quintessential image of romantic moodiness in Wong Kar-wai’s 2000 film In the Mood for Love. This is just one of the moments captured by famed Hong Kong artist Wing Shya, who made his name shooting on set as the legendary Chinese filmmaker’s exclusive photographer.

After 25 years in the industry, Wing just launched a limited-edition three-book box set of his work at the opening of his retrospective at the Shanghai Centre of Photography (SCoP).

“I change my direction regularly,” says Wing, who is definitely...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Afm: Philip Yung’s ‘Ambitions’ Picked up by Mei Ah (Exclusive)

Afm: Philip Yung’s ‘Ambitions’ Picked up by Mei Ah (Exclusive)
Mei Ah Entertainment has picked up rights to “Theory of Ambitions,” an upcoming Hong Kong crime thriller from “Port of Call” director Philip Yung.

The movie stars Tony Leung Chiu-wai (“The Grandmaster,” “In The Mood for Love”) and singing-acting superstar Aaron Kwok, the star of “Port,” which carried Hong Kong’s foreign-language Oscar hopes last year.

The story involves two corrupt cops, who rise to the top levels of the police force each controlling different parts of the city while simultaneously being steeped in organized crime. After initially working in perfect unison, their relationship turns to one of rivalry.

Port of Call” was an unconventional breakthrough for Yung, who wrote and directed. Based on real events involving the murder of a prostitute in 2008, and with his script revealing the killer midway through, it could not qualify as a whodunit. Rather it provided an unusual intensity and elicited a strong performance from Kwok as a disillusioned former detective
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Wong Kar-Wai Talks Amazon Series ‘Tong Wars,’ Drops ‘Gucci’ Movie

Imagine having had as impeccable a cinematic run as filmmaker Wong Kar-Wai. In the ’90s up through the beginning of the aughts, the Chinese auteur delivered “As Tears Go By,” “Chungking Express,” “The Days Of Being Wild,” “Ashes Of Time,” “Fallen Angels,” “Happy Together” and, the peak of it all, “In the Mood For Love.” The unlikely mesmerizing sci-fi sequel “2046” followed in 2004, but it’s been a bumpy, uneven road since then.

Continue reading Wong Kar-Wai Talks Amazon Series ‘Tong Wars,’ Drops ‘Gucci’ Movie at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Wong Kar-wai Explains His Move to Television With Amazon’s ‘Tong Wars’ and His Next Feature Film

Wong Kar-wai Explains His Move to Television With Amazon’s ‘Tong Wars’ and His Next Feature Film
Among the many filmmakers who have made the jump to television in recent years, one of the most intriguing names to join the fray is Wong Kar Wai. The Hong Kong auteur’s lyrical, romantic dramas about poetic loners — including such beloved titles as “Chungking Express” and “In the Mood for Love” — treasure texture over dense plot. So it was something of a surprise when Amazon unveiled five new series in the works in early September, including one from Wong called “Tong Wars,” described as combining the history of Chinese immigration to the U.S. with a crime potboiler and scripted by Paul Attanasio (“Quiz Show,” “Donnie Brasco”).

Details on the series were scant at the time, but in a conversation with journalists at the Lumiere Festival in Lyon, Wong explained the epic sweep of the show. “The thing that attracted me to this project was the first opportunity to
See full article at Indiewire »

Wong Kar Wai Feted at Thierry Fremaux's Lyon Lumiere Festival

Wong Kar Wai Feted at Thierry Fremaux's Lyon Lumiere Festival
The audience at this year's Lumiere Film Festival was in the mood for love, with Cannes topper Thierry Fremaux, directors Olivier Assayas and Bertrand Tavernier and actress Isabelle Adjani celebrating filmmaker Wong Kar Wai in a lavish ceremony Friday night in Lyon, France.

The ceremony was marked by emotional speeches — Assayas (who is divorced from In the Mood for Love star Maggie Cheung) called Wong “a grand poet of cinema” — and raucous routines.

Zhang Ziyi sent a video message, telling her Grandmaster director that he “should get awards everyday.”

Wong's longtime cinematographer Christopher Doyle also took the stage with...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Best Cinematography of the 21st Century: ‘Pan’s Labyrinth,’ ‘Children of Men,’ and More

  • Indiewire
The Best Cinematography of the 21st Century: ‘Pan’s Labyrinth,’ ‘Children of Men,’ and More
Here are the most visually striking movies made since 2000.

Related stories25 Films With the Best Cinematography of the 21st Century, From 'Tree of Life' to 'In the Mood for Love''Twin Peaks: The Return': Even David Lynch's Cinematographer Can't Explain What It All Means'The Mountain Between Us': How Cinematographer Mandy Walker Shot at 11,000 Feet
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: Christopher Doyle Visually Dazzles, Narratively Disappoints in ‘Hong Kong Trilogy’

An often serenely meditative exploration of sociopolitical life in contemporary Hong Kong, Christopher Doyle’s Hong Kong Trilogy is a stunningly-photographed blend of documentary and fictional narrative, following real locals playing themselves. We can’t tell where real life ends and fiction begins, and ultimately, we don’t care. The film marks Doyle’s first directorial effort, crowdfunded via a Kickstarter campaign in 2014. Doyle, the self-proclaimed Keith Richards of cinematographers, is one of the most beloved and provocative DPs in the world, endowed with an exquisite eye for composition. His new film, however, meanders around for a merciful 85 minutes before fading to black, never fusing together into anything impacting, beyond a fleetingly casual interest in the characters. Other than that, we’re left with just a handful of dazzling visuals to recall, and little more.

The film is divided across three chapters. The first, titled Preschooled, follows the students of a local private school,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Wong Kar-Wai is in the Mood to Direct Crime Drama Series ‘The Tong Wars’ for Amazon

Wong Kar-Wai is in the Mood to Direct Crime Drama Series ‘The Tong Wars’ for Amazon
Wong Kar-Wai has made an indelible mark on the cinema, helming foreign film classics like In the Mood for Love and Chungking Express. But even for a well-regarded director like Wong, the grass is starting to look a little greener on the TV side. And not only TV, but TV streaming. That’s right, Wong Kar-Wai is the next auteur […]

The post Wong Kar-Wai is in the Mood to Direct Crime Drama Series ‘The Tong Wars’ for Amazon appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »
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