7.2/10
109,569
215 user 69 critic

Anastasia (1997)

Trailer
2:30 | Trailer
The last surviving child of the Russian Royal Family joins two con men to reunite with her grandmother, the Dowager Empress, while the undead Rasputin seeks her death.

Directors:

Don Bluth, Gary Goldman

Writers:

Susan Gauthier (screenplay), Bruce Graham (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
2,219 ( 130)
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 10 wins & 21 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Meg Ryan ... Anastasia (voice)
John Cusack ... Dimitri (voice)
Kelsey Grammer ... Vladimir (voice)
Christopher Lloyd ... Rasputin (voice)
Hank Azaria ... Bartok (voice)
Bernadette Peters ... Sophie (voice)
Kirsten Dunst ... Young Anastasia (voice)
Angela Lansbury ... The Dowager Empress Marie (voice)
Rick Jones Rick Jones ... Czar Nicholas / Servant / Revolutionary Soldier / Ticket Agent (voice)
Andrea Martin ... Phlegmenkoff / Old Woman (voice)
Glenn Walker Harris Jr. ... Young Dimitri (voice)
Debra Mooney ... Actress (voice)
Arthur Malet ... Travelling Man / Major Domo (voice)
Charity James ... Anastasia Impostor (voice)
Liz Callaway ... Anastasia (singing voice)
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Storyline

The daughter of the last Russian Czar, Nicolas II (Rick Jones), Anastasia (Meg Ryan) is found by two Russian con men, Dimitri (John Cusack) and Vladimir (Kelsey Grammer), who seek the reward that her grandmother, the Dowager Empress Marie Feodorovna (Dame Angela Lansbury), promised to the ones who'll find her. But the evil mystic of the Czar family, Grigori Rasputin (Christopher Lloyd), still wants the Romanov family to be destroyed forever.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Discover the Adventure Behind the Greatest Mystery of Our Time


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This movie marked the first movie by Don Bluth and Gary Goldman to be fully animated and produced in the United States, since An American Tail (1986). See more »

Goofs

After Anastasia sees her grandmother and Sophie at the Paris Opera and says, "Please let her remember me," she points the binoculars back towards them, but the reflection is of the Russian Ballet dancers on stage. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Dowager Empress Marie: There was a time, not very long ago, where we lived in an enchanted world of elegant palaces and grand parties. The year was 1916, and my son, Nicholas, was the czar of Imperial Russia.
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Crazy Credits

The version shown on HBO and related channels contains extra credits for the Spanish-language version of the film. The song over those credits, a Spanish version of "Journey to the Past," was on the film's soundtrack album. See more »

Alternate Versions

The version shown on HBO and related channels contains extra credits for the Spanish-language version of the film. The song over those credits, a Spanish version of "Journey to the Past," was on the film's soundtrack album. See more »

Connections

Featured in AniMat's Classic Reviews: The King and I (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

"Once Upon a December
(Reunion)
Music by Stephen Flaherty
Lyrics by Lynn Ahrens
Performed by Liz Callaway and Angela Lansbury
See more »

User Reviews

 
A classic for all ages
17 March 1999 | by OrielSee all my reviews

Let others carp about the disservices to history: this Anastasia rises above its flaws to offer an engaging, emotionally resonant story of a girl's search for identity. Within its historical, quasi-factual context, the film presents a situation almost everyone can relate to--that of trying to find one's place in the world. Orphaned Anya's quest for her past (and, consequently, her future) strikes universal emotional chords: singing "Journey to the Past," she sets out with both trepidation and hope to find her identity and her place in the world. The haunting, poignant "Once Upon a December" sequence, one of the finest scenes in any recent film, is unforgettable, as we watch Anya's yearnings take the form of a ghostly dance with memories of a vanished life. And the final reunion where hostility melts gradually into acceptance, is one of the most moving and satisfying moments in film. Everything about the film bespeaks loving attention and quality: the magnificent animation and design re-create lavish Russian and Parisian locations (complete with recognizable artworks and cameos by celebrities of the '20s), and the screenplay balances action, humor, and genuine emotion. Villain Rasputin is clearly aimed at children, and some of the repartee between Anya and unlikely hero Dimitri may seem jarringly anachronistic, but viewers of any age should still enjoy this timeless coming-of-age story.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Russian | French

Release Date:

21 November 1997 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Music Box See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$50,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$120,541, 16 November 1997

Gross USA:

$58,406,347

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$139,804,348
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS (as dts) (DTS HD Master Audio 5.1) (5.1 Surround Sound) (5.1)| Dolby Digital (as Dolby Digital) (Dolby Digital 5.1) (5.1 Surround Sound) (5.1)| SDDS (as Sony Dynamic Digital Sound) (8 channels) (5.1 Surround Sound) (5.1)| D-Cinema 48kHz 5.1 (D-Cinema prints) (5.1 Surround Sound) (5.1)| Dolby Atmos (Dolby Atmos) (5.1 Surround Sound) (5.1)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »

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