6.6/10
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251 user 16 critic

Dawson's Creek 

Trailer
2:02 | Trailer
Four friends in a small coastal town help each other cope with adolescence.

Creator:

Kevin Williamson
Reviews
Popularity
129 ( 4)

Episodes

Seasons


Years



6   5   4   3   2   1  
2003   2002   2001   2000   1999   1998  
6 wins & 26 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
James Van Der Beek ...  Dawson Leery 128 episodes, 1998-2003
Katie Holmes ...  Joey Potter 128 episodes, 1998-2003
Michelle Williams ...  Jen Lindley 128 episodes, 1998-2003
Joshua Jackson ...  Pacey Witter 128 episodes, 1998-2003
Mary Beth Peil ...  Evelyn 'Grams' Ryan 128 episodes, 1998-2003
Kerr Smith ...  Jack McPhee 113 episodes, 1998-2003
Mary-Margaret Humes ...  Gail Leery 93 episodes, 1998-2003
Nina Repeta ...  Bessie Potter 88 episodes, 1998-2003
John Wesley Shipp ...  Mitch Leery 83 episodes, 1998-2001
Meredith Monroe ...  Andie McPhee / ... 69 episodes, 1998-2003
Busy Philipps ...  Audrey Liddell 46 episodes, 2001-2003
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Storyline

Set in a small coastal, Massachusetts town named Capeside, Dawson's Creek tells the story of four teenagers as they struggle through adolescence. This is particularly true for 15-year-olds Dawson Leery, an introspective dreamer and Joey Potter, a precocious tomboy unaware of her beauty. Best friends since childhood, they are about to enter that confusing time in life where nothing is the way it was and nothing is as it seems. Written by John <littlejohnboy@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

None of the cast ever refer to their partners as babe, honey, sweetheart, darling, et cetera. They always use their first names, or a shortened version of their first name, except for Pacey, who used his last name at times. Other than Pacey calling Andie "honey" in season two, episode sixteen, "Be Careful What You Wish For", and later on in the same season, when Pacey calls Andie "sweetheart" as they are walking out of the kitchen, as when they are helping Joey with a catered wedding, and Joey calling Pacey "sweetheart" in the episode "A Winter's Tale." Season 5, Jen calls Dawson babe, or baby several times See more »

Goofs

Throughout out the series, it's clear that the actors/actresses portraying teenagers are actually in their 20s+. This is done as to not interfere with the schooling of real teenagers and to give the general viewing audience who are teenagers themselves, people to look up too. See more »

Quotes

[Dawson insults and drives away a film critic]
Oliver Chirchuck: Apologize, kiss her ass, get down on your knees and beg, just do whatever it takes to get her back here.
Dawson: Alright, alright. What are you going to do?
Oliver Chirchuck: I'm gonna go and hit on your ex-girlfriend.
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Alternate Versions

Paula Cole's "I Don't Want to Wait" was the theme song originally used during the broadcast of the show. However on the US region 1 DVDs this song is only used for the first two seasons. The subsequent seasons use Jann Arden's "Run Like Mad" See more »

Connections

Referenced in After Lately: The PA Hole (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

I Don't Want to Wait
(theme)
by Paula Cole
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User Reviews

What TV should be.
24 May 2000 | by Covey-3See all my reviews

Dawson's Creek is by no means a realistic portrayal of teenage angst. I'll admit this. The power of the series and what, in my view, makes it far and away the best thing to happen to TV in a long, long time, is that is it a realistic portrayal of teenage emotions...

The characters in Dawson's Creek may only be 16, yet as Eve said to Dawson (early Season 3) they are all 'old souls'. The emotions in the series are real, the emotions felt by the characters are real, yet, the fact that Kevin Williamson has allowed the characters a vocal outlet for these emotions is the genius of the show. My So Called Life was a brave attempt to do this, but fell short through its pretensions of grandeur. Dawson's Creek embraces the fact that the vocabulary spoken is fake and because of this, is entirely forgiven. This is why we watch television, to feel and see emotions that we cannot or do not feel in our own lives.

As Dawson once said, "Movies (And TV) by definition are escapism, if you want reality look out of the window." Dawson's Creek knows what it is. A fictional television show about high school kids and the emotions they deal with. By admitting its falseness, yet retaining its warmth, humanity and heart, we are able to witness characters that we know aren't real, that we know in real life wouldn't have the vocabulary that these kids possess, but who we believe in and we root for.

Not only emotionally is Dawson's Creek superb, but technically, the series is faultless. Musically, artists like Sarah Mclachlan and Jewel fit snugly into the feel of the series, while artists like New Radicals and Semisonic serve to enhance emotions. The choice of song in Dawson's Creek is rarely wrong and often perfect. The music does not lead the scene into the direction of the song, but serves to reinforce and enhance the emotion that the scene portrays and requires.

Visually, the gorgeous backdrop of Wilmington, North Carolina is fitting as the small American village that is Capeside. The scenic beauty of the Creek, the coast, the woodland, the foliage. Everything visually about the show is in keeping with the emotional context of the show.

Camera work is also faultless. When presented with a difficult emotional scene, we usually pull away from the action at the end of the scene, not judging the characters for their mistakes and allowing them the right to deal with it on their own, without our interference. Only rarely do we judge the characters and when we do, the characters themselves have already beat us to it. (Dawson and Andie getting drunk)

I'd like to thank Kevin Williamson for allowing me the chance to fall in love with the town, the people and the life. These emotions are real. The vocabulary, is just a way of allowing the emotions to have a voice.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

20 January 1998 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Dawson's Creek See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(128 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

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