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Blake Heron Dies: ‘Shiloh’ Star Was 35

Actor Blake Heron, best known for his role as Marty Preston in the 1996 film Shiloh, has died. He was 35. The Los Angeles County Department of Medical Examiner-Coroner confirmed that Heron died Friday. He was found by a friend at his L.A.-area home and pronounced dead at the scene by paramedics. The Sherman Oaks, CA, native made his film debut at age 13 in Disney’s Tom and Huck and TV series Reality Check. He went on to star in TV movie Trilogy of Terror II and also had a…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Blake Heron Dies: ‘Shiloh’ Star Was 35

Blake Heron Dies: ‘Shiloh’ Star Was 35
Actor Blake Heron, best known for his role as Marty Preston in the 1996 film Shiloh, has died. He was 35. The Los Angeles County Department of Medical Examiner-Coroner confirmed that Heron died Friday. He was found by a friend at his L.A.-area home and pronounced dead at the scene by paramedics. The Sherman Oaks, CA, native made his film debut at age 13 in Disney’s Tom and Huck and TV series Reality Check. He went on to star in TV movie Trilogy of Terror II and also had a…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

‘Shiloh’ Star Blake Heron Dies at 35

‘Shiloh’ Star Blake Heron Dies at 35
Blake Heron, who gained fame as a teen actor during the 1990s, has died at his home in La Crescenta, Calif. He was 35.

The Los Angeles County Department of Medical Examiner-Coroner and his former manager confirmed his death. Heron was found unresponsive at his residence on Friday morning. Paramedics pronounced him dead at the scene. His cause of death has not been determined yet.

Heron was discovered by a friend who told authorities that he had been sick with the flu for the last few days.

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Heron, a native of Sherman Oaks, Calif., made his film debut in the 1995 Disney movie “Tom and Huck,” playing Ben Rodgers, and in the TV series “Reality Check” as Bud McNeight. In 1996, he starred in the Warner Bros. family drama “Shiloh,” portraying an adolescent who rescues an abused hunting dog in a small town. Michael Moriarty, Ann Dowd, and Scott Wilson co-starred in the pic. The
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Actor Geoffrey Lewis Passes Away at Age 79

Veteran character actor Geoffrey Lewis, known to genre fans for his roles as Mike Ryerson in Tobe Hooper’s Salem‘s Lot (1979), Terry McKeen in Brett Leonard’s The Lawnmower Man (1992), Stubbs in Dan Curtis’s Trilogy of Terror II (1996), and as Roy Sullivan in Rob Zombie’s The Devil‘s Rejects (2005), passed away on April 7th in Woodland Hills, CA at age 79. The father of actress Juliette Lewis, he appeared in over 200 roles … Continue reading →

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The Greatest Horror Anthology Film Segments of All Time

Popular in the 1960s and early 1970s with more rare appearances in the 1980s, 1990s and the 2000s, the anthology-style horror film has made a solid resurgence in recent years with such portmanteau releases as The ABCs of Death films and the V/H/S series.

With Mexico Barbaro, Fear Paris and other projects in various stages of completion, the anthology horror film looks to continue to be an important part of the horror cinema landscape.

Some anthology films employ a framing or wraparound sequence in an attempt to connect the segments that make up the film while others dispense with this classic Amicus-style approach entirely and simply present a collection of short films connected by genre.

Either way, a horror anthology film is ultimately about the quality of its individual segments and this article will take you on a tour of the greatest horror anthology segments of all time.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Horror at the Oscars Part III

Tremors? Nightbreed? Sundown: The Vampire in Retreat? 976-evil? Are all on the list this year. And though there were not huge horror wins in sound editing through screenplays, the Technical Awards never cease to bring out the horror veterans. Notably Tim Drnec who contributed to such VHS classics as Alien Seed, Destroyer, and Prison won for his work on “Spydercam 3D volumetric suspended cable camera technologies.” An award also shared with Ben Britten Smith and Matt Davis who both also worked on Constantine.

But among all the winners, the Academy also honored some great loses in 2010. And though they mentioned some of our heroes, Dennis Hooper (Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2), Kevin McCarthy (Invasion of the Body Snatchers) and Dino de Laurentiis (King Kong), they did not mention Zelda Rubinstein or Corey Haim. But we will in this last section and the others lost to us last year.

So farewell fight fans and remember,
See full article at Dread Central »

Dead Of Night (DVD Review)

There are those of us reading this who still remember the sweet shocks of the made-for-tv 1970s horror movie. Usually spat out by ABC under its Movie of the Week moniker, they were less daring, less profane but occasionally brilliant exercises in compact genre mayhem.

These prime-time flicks employed network stars in melodramatic tales designed to seep under your skin—often in less than 90 minutes, commercials included. Y’know, stuff like Don’T Be Afraid Of The Dark, Crowhaven Farm, Moon Of The Wolf…and of course, the immortal Karen Black vehicle Trilogy Of Terror.

Which brings us to the man who not only gave us Trilogy Of Terror, but several more of the best ‘70s TV-movie macabres, the late and indisputably great Dan Curtis. He was the driving force behind the cult ‘60s daytime vampire soap opera Dark Shadows and its theatrical adaptations (1970’s excellent House Of Dark Shadows
See full article at Fangoria »

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