The Truce (1997) - News Poster

(1997)

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Turturro delivers masterclass in Jerusalem

  • ScreenDaily
Turturro delivers masterclass in Jerusalem
The actor spoke about working with Michael Cimino, William Friedkin and Woody Allen in a masterclass at Jerusalem Film Festival.

Following his appearance at the Jerusalem Film Festival’s (July 9-19) opening night gala of Nanni Moretti’s My Mother, where he was also presented with an honorary award, John Turturro joined author and Columbia University professor Annette Insdorf for an on-stage conversation at the Jerusalem Cinematheque. Here are a few highlights.

On portraying a ‘bad actor’ in Nanni Moretti’s My Mother

“I didn’t see it that way because anybody can be bad. You can see the best actor in the world struggle and I’ve seen all kinds of behaviour. I’ve had arguments with directors over the years – I won’t name them – but you’re under a lot of pressure as an actor. I’ve seen great actors, if they stay up all night, if they’ve had too much to drink
See full article at ScreenDaily »

John Turturro On His ‘Mia Madre’ Character: “I’ve Seen All Kinds Of Extreme Behavior In My Business” — Cannes Video

John Turturro On His ‘Mia Madre’ Character: “I’ve Seen All Kinds Of Extreme Behavior In My Business” — Cannes Video
No Italian-American actor loves returning to Italy to work in local films more than John Turturro. He played Auschwitz survivor Primo Levi in the late Francesco Rosi’s 1997 feature The Truce. Turturro frequently collaborates with director-cinematographer Marco Pontecorvo, who directed the actor in this year’s Tempo instabile con probabili schiarite and also shot the actor’s directorials Fading Gigolo and his Naples music doc Passione. Turturro holds dual citizenship in…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Berlinale to host Francesco Rosi tribute

  • ScreenDaily
Berlinale to host Francesco Rosi tribute
Italian director and screenwriter died on Saturday.

The 65th Berlin International Film Festival (Feb 5-15) is to pay homage to Francesco Rosi, one of one of Italy’s most-celebrated and influential filmmakers from the 1950s to the 1990s.

The director and screenwriter, who inspiring the likes of Francis Coppola and Martin Scorsese with his Italian post-war neo-realist style, passed away on Saturday (Jan 10) at the age of 92.

In homage, the Berlinale has added Many Wars Ago (Uomini Contro) to the upcoming programme, Rosi’s 1970 anti-war drama set on the mountainous Austrian-Italian front during the First World War.

Berlinale director Dieter Kosslick said: “The loss of Francesco Rosi is the loss of an outstanding filmmaker. With their explosive power, Rosi’s films are still persuasive today. His works are classics of politically engaged cinema.”

Rosi’s films often examined corruption and criminality and some of his best-known films told the stories of real events and real people in order
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Italian director Francesco Rosi dies, aged 92

Italian director Francesco Rosi dies, aged 92
Italian director Francesco Rosi had died, aged 92.

Rosi was one of Italy's most-celebrated and influential filmmakers, working throughout the 1950s to the 1990s.

He was known for his Italian post-war neo-realist style of filmmaking, inspiring the likes of Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese.

He won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival in 1963 for Hands Over the City, and the Palme d'Or in Cannes in 1972 for The Mattei Affair.

Two years ago, he was awarded an honorary Golden Lion for his lifetime achievement.

Oscar-winning director Paolo Sorrentino said in tribute: "There are directors, and they are few and far between, who are capable of constructing worlds, and they do it by the invention of methods and styles. Rosi was one of the very few."

Among his other films were Salvatore Giuliano, Carmen and his last project The Truce in 1997.

Watch a trailer for Salvatore Giuliano below:
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Francesco Rosi, Palme d’Or-Winning Italian Director, Dies at 92

Francesco Rosi, Palme d’Or-Winning Italian Director, Dies at 92
Rome — Italian director Francesco Rosi, known for socially engaged investigative dramas, including 1972 Palme d’Or winner “The Mattei Affair,” and for his depiction of the complex roots of corruption in Italy, died Saturday at his home in Rome. He was 92.

The cause of death was complications from bronchitis, according to Italian press reports.

After starting out as an assistant to Luchino Visconti in the late 1940s, Naples-born Rosi kicked off his directorial career at the 1958 Venice Film Festival, where his first feature “La sfida” (“The Challenge”), which delved into the intricacies of the Neapolitan mob, scooped the Special Jury prize.

Rosi’s 1962 Berlin Silver Bear winner “Salvatore Giuliano” rigorously reconstructed the perverse criminal power play in postwar Sicily. His “Hands Over the City” took on rapacious real-estate developers and their political cronies in Naples and scooped the 1963 Venice Golden Lion.

Palme d’Or winner “The Mattei Affair” is an investigation
See full article at Variety - Film News »

St Petersburg Forum examines Russian co-pros

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St Petersburg Forum examines Russian co-pros
A roundup of news from the inaugural St Petersburg International Media Forum includes a busy French delegation and a local controversy brewing over Leviathan.

The King Of Madagascar, a kind of Russian answer to the pirate adventure films à la Pirates of the Caribbean, is being set up as a $ 16m international co-production by producer-director Oleg Ryaskov’s Moscow-based Bft Movie.

Speaking at the opening of St Petersburg International Media Forum’s (Spimf) co-production market this morning, producer Ryaskov revealed that the project - which is based on real historical events abouta Russian expedition by Peter The Great to the island of Madagascar in danger of being thwarted by Great Britain’s King George - has Spain’s Smartline Spain and the Us casting company Scott Carlson Entertainment on board as partners and is currently in talks with French and German production companies to join.

Ryaskov added that he intends to have American, European and Russian
See full article at ScreenDaily »

St Petersburg Forum examines state of Russian co-productions

  • ScreenDaily
St Petersburg Forum examines state of Russian co-productions
A roundup of news from the inaugural St Petersburg International Media Forum includes a busy French delegation and a local controversy brewing over Leviathan.

The King Of Madagascar, a kind of Russian answer to the pirate adventure films à la Pirates of the Caribbean, is being set up as a $ 16m international co-production by producer-director Oleg Ryaskov’s Moscow-based Bft Movie.

Speaking at the opening of St Petersburg International Media Forum’s (Spimf) co-production market this morning, producer Ryaskov revealed that the project - which is based on real historical events abouta Russian expedition by Peter The Great to the island of Madagascar in danger of being thwarted by Great Britain’s King George - has Spain’s Smartline Spain and the Us casting company Scott Carlson Entertainment on board as partners and is currently in talks with French and German production companies to join.

Ryaskov added that he intends to have American, European and Russian
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Movie Poster of the Week: The Posters of Francesco Rosi

  • MUBI
An essential retrospective has just started at BAMcinématek in New York of the films of the great Italian chronicler of crime and punishment (or lack of), Francesco Rosi. One of the least talked about of the great Italian directors, Rosi, now aged 88, has been making films since the late 1950s and is mostly known for his canonical Salvatore Giuliano (1962). Both that film and its superb follow-up Hands Over the City (1963) are available from Criterion, but there is precious little else available here. (One exception is Illustrious Corpses, my favorite Rosi film, illustrated above with its French poster, which I only just discovered is streamable on Netflix under the name The Context and, sadly, dubbed. I highly recommend ignoring that and seeing the film on screen on August 20th, along with the rest of this unmissable series.)

The best Rosi posters come from all over the globe, and though most of
See full article at MUBI »

Netflix Nuggets: Who’s Up For a Miramax Marathon?

Netflix has revolutionized the home movie experience for fans of film with its instant streaming technology. Netflix Nuggets is my way of spreading the word about independent, classic and foreign films made available by Netflix for instant streaming.

Sorry, folks… there are simply too many great films streaming this week to post an image for them all, but that’s a good thing, eh? You’ve got your movie watching work cut out for you, due in great part to Miramax releasing damn near their entire catalog of films on one day!

B. Monkey (1999)

Streaming Available: 05/01/2011

Director: Michael Radford

Synopsis: Good-hearted schoolteacher Alan Furnace (Jared Harris) desperately wants some excitement in his life — and he may just get some. One lonely night at a London bar, Alan spies the raven-haired beauty Beatrice (Asia Argento) arguing with two friends, Paul (Rupert Everett) and Bruno (Jonathan Rhys-Meyers). Beatrice quickly befriends Alan and
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Musical Traditions of Naples Become John Turturro’s ‘Passione’

By Elliot V. Kotek

(from Moving Pictures, winter issue, 2011)

John Turturro goes behind the camera for the fourth time with “Passione,” a film that allows the actor-director to give a unique perspective on his Italian heritage and bring to the screen the beauty — and intrigue — of Naples in the form of a musical journey. As he tells Moving Pictures, “It just turned out to be one of these movies that you get involved in that’s way beyond you.”

Moving Pictures: You were born in the U.S., but here you take a trip back to — or a trip to — Naples in the story.

John Turturro: Well … there are people who are interested in their background and their culture. I think a lot of people who come to America, you know, want to become Americanized. My father was born in Italy and came when he was 6 years old,
See full article at Moving Pictures Magazine »

Musical Traditions of Naples Become John Turturro’s ‘Passione’

By Elliot V. Kotek

(from Moving Pictures, winter issue, 2011)

John Turturro goes behind the camera for the fourth time with “Passione,” a film that allows the actor-director to give a unique perspective on his Italian heritage and bring to the screen the beauty — and intrigue — of Naples in the form of a musical journey. As he tells Moving Pictures, “It just turned out to be one of these movies that you get involved in that’s way beyond you.”

Moving Pictures: You were born in the U.S., but here you take a trip back to — or a trip to — Naples in the story.

John Turturro: Well … there are people who are interested in their background and their culture. I think a lot of people who come to America, you know, want to become Americanized. My father was born in Italy and came when he was 6 years old,
See full article at Moving Pictures Network »

John Turturro: Naples, music and me

My family is Sicilian and Naples has long held a fascination for me – for its beauty, its danger and above all its music. Passione is my attempt to put those feelings into film

My family is originally from Sicily and my father was from Puglia. My cousin Aida is half Neapolitan. Most of the Italians in New York are from Naples, Sicily and Calabria – the south. Naples itself reminds me a little bit of New York in the 70s, except everyone is crushed together more. It's so beautiful and so dangerous. It has a brutality, but also a sense of poetry – plenty of writers have lived there and written about it. Neopolitans have their own language and, most importantly, the people are unbelievably musical. The relationship between classical and popular music goes back a long, long time. Many classical musicians (and some great opera singers) have sung popular Neapolitan songs throughout the years.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Primo Levi's Journey: Theatrical Poster

  • I admit to not knowing one damn thing about this writer named Primo LeviPrimo Levi
[/link] – all the more reason to be curious about this week’s release of Primo Levi's Journey – a Cinema Guild release. Narrated by Chris Cooper, this doc’s starting point begins in the winter of 1945, Primo Levi, one the century’s greatest writers (“If This Is A Man”), was liberated from the Auschwitz concentration camp. With the war still underway, he embarked on a thousand-mile journey to his home in Turin, Italy – a strange and beguiling odyssey memorialized in his book, “The Truce.” Sixty years later, director Davide Ferrario set out to follow in Levi’s footsteps. Retracing his historic trip through Poland, Ukraine, Belarus, Moldova, Rumania, Hungary, Slovakia and Austria, Primo Levi’S Journey weaves a path through a modern Europe that has both changed and remained eerily the same – from democratic rallies in
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

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