7.6/10
128,143
497 user 162 critic

Lost Highway (1997)

After a bizarre encounter at a party with a stranger, a jazz saxophonist is framed for the murder of his wife and sent to prison, where he inexplicably morphs into a young mechanic, gets released, and begins leading a new life.

Director:

David Lynch
Reviews
Popularity
1,891 ( 224)
4 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Bill Pullman ... Fred Madison
Patricia Arquette ... Renee Madison / Alice Wakefield
John Roselius ... Al
Louis Eppolito Louis Eppolito ... Ed (as Lou Eppolito)
Jenna Maetlind Jenna Maetlind ... Party Girl
Michael Massee ... Andy
Robert Blake ... Mystery Man
Henry Rollins ... Guard Henry
Michael Shamus Wiles ... Guard Mike
Mink Stole ... Forewoman (voice)
Leonard Termo ... Judge (voice)
Ivory Ocean ... Guard Ivory
Jack Kehler ... Guard Johnny Mack
David Byrd ... Doctor Smordin
Gene Ross ... Warden Clements
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Storyline

Fred Madison, a saxophonist, is accused under mysterious circumstances of murdering his wife Renee. On death row, he inexplicably morphs into a young man named Pete Dayton, leading a completely different life. When Pete is released, his and Fred's paths begin to cross in a surreal, suspenseful web of intrigue, orchestrated by a shady gangster boss named Dick Laurent. Written by <jdean@gslink.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Mystery | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for bizarre violent and sexual content, and for strong language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The interior shots of the "Lost Highway Hotel" were filmed at the Amargosa Hotel in Death Valley, California, which is said to be haunted. See more »

Goofs

When Pete and Alice are having sex in the car, external shots show the car parked alongside a wall in a dark, tree-covered section of street. Yet in interior shots, the wall is many metres away in the far background and is brightly illuminated. See more »

Quotes

Ed: Fucker gets more pussy than a toilet seat.
See more »

Crazy Credits

A Real Trooper-Guadalupe Hurst See more »

Alternate Versions

The "Rammstein" music video shows the scene of Fred being featured on one of the video tapes. See more »

Connections

References Eraserhead (1977) See more »

Soundtracks

Apple Of Sodom
Written by Marilyn Manson
Dinger & Ollie Music/Beat Up Your Mom Music (BMI)
Administered by Dinger & Ollie Music (BMI)
Performed by Marilyn Manson
Produced by Marilyn Manson (as M. Manson) and Sean Beavan
Mixed by Sean Beavan
Courtesy of Nothing/Interscope Records
See more »

User Reviews

 
An incredibly well-done film... but not for everyone's tastes
11 June 2005 | by TBJCSKCNRRQTreviewsSee all my reviews

This is the first film directed by David Lynch I've seen, not counting The Elephant Man, which is another great film, but is an outsider in his career, since it is not surreal. This film is, however, making it the first typical Lynch film I've seen. And I'm honestly not sure what to make of it. I had heard a lot about Lynch's films before watching, but I guess I hadn't heard enough. I went into this film hoping for a good mystery, an interesting puzzle to solve. As the end credits rolled I didn't know what to make of what I had just seen. I didn't get an answer to the question I kept asking while I was watching; "What exactly is this film about?". As soon as the credits were over, I read a comment or two by Lynch fans... and the truth dawned on me. It's not supposed to be solved. It's not a movie where you, when you see the very end, exclaim "Ah! Now I get it!". This film won't provide you with some twist ending or have a character come up to the lead and explain it all. It's not supposed to make perfect sense or be easily explainable. It's not real. It's fantasy. Fiction. The whole film is like a dream, or, more appropriately, a nightmare. The film is great; it's just not for me. I won't let that affect my rating, however. This was an excellent example of masterful film-making. Lynch's direction is eminent, evidenced by the fact that I kept watching, despite not understanding half of what was going on or being able to sympathize with any character(something we are much too used to from mainstream movies). The lighting is great. Lynch really plays around with it, and it's always interesting to look at. It also really adds to the mood, nicely set by careful editing and music usage. The acting is flawless, and that is not a term I use lightly. All in all, a wonderfully well-done film, but definitely not for everyone. Wasn't in my tastes, but I enjoyed how well-made it was regardless. I recommend this to fans of art films, rather than conventional ones. Fans of Lynch should enjoy this. Very surreal and loose. 10/10


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

France | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

15 January 1997 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Lost Highway See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$15,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$212,710, 23 February 1997

Gross USA:

$3,675,201

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$3,703,548
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »

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