A drifting gunslinger-for-hire finds himself in the middle of an ongoing war between the Irish and Italian mafia in a Prohibition era ghost town.

Director:

Walter Hill

Writers:

Ryûzô Kikushima (story), Akira Kurosawa (story) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Bruce Willis ... John Smith
Bruce Dern ... Sheriff Ed Galt
William Sanderson ... Joe Monday
Christopher Walken ... Hickey
David Patrick Kelly ... Doyle
Karina Lombard ... Felina
Ned Eisenberg ... Fredo Strozzi
Alexandra Powers ... Lucy Kolinski
Michael Imperioli ... Giorgio Carmonte
Ken Jenkins ... Capt. Tom Pickett
R.D. Call R.D. Call ... Jack McCool
Ted Markland ... Deputy Bob
Leslie Mann ... Wanda
Patrick Kilpatrick ... Finn
Luis Contreras ... Comandante Ramirez
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Storyline

John Smith is an amoral gunslinger in the days of Prohibition. On the lam from his latest (unspecified) exploits, he happens upon the town of Jericho, Texas. Actually, calling Jericho a town would be too generous--it has become more like a ghost town, since two warring gangs have 'driven off all the decent folk.' Smith sees this as an opportunity to play both sides off against each other, earning himself a nice piece of change as a hired gun. Despite his strictly avowed mercenary intentions, he finds himself risking his life for his, albeit skewed, sense of honor.... Written by Tad Dibbern <DIBBERN_D@a1.mscf.upenn.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

There are two sides to every war. And John Smith is on both of them. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for pervasive strong violence and some sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Elmer Bernstein was originally hired to compose the music, but he was fired by Walter Hill after writing half of the score, on the basis that it wasn't what he was looking for. See more »

Goofs

At the very beginning of the movie there is a shot of Smith driving towards town and there is nothing but desert. In the next scene we see power poles following the road into town.

The power for Jericho comes from gas generators (Smith's conversation with the bartender); Jericho is in the middle of nowhere. The poles shown only extend so far and their sole purpose is to provide light just so far out-of-town because the town has few resources. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
John Smith: It's a funny thing. No matter how low you sink there's still a right and wrong. You always end up choosing. You go one way so you can try to live with yourself. You go the other, you'd still be walkin' around, but you're dead and you don't even know it.
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Connections

Referenced in I'm in the Band: Last Weasel Standing (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Denver Blues
Written by Hudson Whittaker (as Whittaker Hudson)
Performed by Ry Cooder
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User Reviews

 
Macho, stylish but not very brainy, medium good film
21 February 2011 | by Samiam3See all my reviews

For Last Man Standing, director Walter Hill relocates Kurosawa's Yojimbo to depression era America in a dusty desert town. There is something arguably distinctive about the flick. Perhaps it is the merger of gangster and western; something seldom seen in movies. Or perhaps it is the way that Hill's visual portrayal of a time and place seems flawless. Last Man Standing has an exceptionally retro look to it, very crusty and dusty, and also very macho.

The problem with Last Man Standing comes down to it's roots. Once you've seen Yojimbo, Last Man Standing doesn't feel all that special. Hill never chooses to break free of the Kurosawa structure, so his film is predictable from the get go. Having said that, even if you know the outcome of the trip, part of the journey is worth while. As an action film, Last Man Standing delivers in spectacular fashion. The fight scenes are staged with a sense of gusto and texture; something is often denied to the majority of such scenes in other movies.

When Last Man Standing is in adrenaline mode it works, but when it comes to the talky segments, it feels painfully stiff. The acting style is flat, and everybody delivers their lines with the same sour expression, which Hill seems quite fond of considering how many facial close ups he uses.

In the end, the movie has a little something to offer. It's recommendable on some grounds, but it needs a bit more brain and less brawn.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

20 September 1996 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Gundown See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$67,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$7,010,333, 22 September 1996

Gross USA:

$18,115,927

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$47,267,001
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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