Hamlet (1996) - News Poster

(1996)

News

Mptf Announces Seventh Annual Reel Stories, Real Lives Event

Mptf (Motion Picture & Television Fund) announced today that Emmy Award-winning producer, writer and actor Keegan-Michael Key will host their seventh annual “Reel Stories, Real Lives” event on Thursday, November 8.

Taking place at the Directors Guild of America, the night will feature the industry’s best and brightest stars telling stories that highlight the extraordinary impact of Mptf on the entertainment community. The event’s Presenting Sponsor is Ford Motor Company with additional support from Delta Air Lines and City National Bank, an Rbc Company.

“Reel Stories, Real Lives is a wonderful opportunity to showcase the broad range of support Mptf provides to all members of the entertainment community by telling very personal stories, and in turn, sets the stage to discover the many ways we can help our unique community thrive in this unpredictable industry,” said Bob Beitcher, President and CEO of Mptf.

Keegan-Michael Key is an Emmy and Peabody Award-winning actor,
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that won one of the Big Five, including ‘Sunset Boulevard,’ ‘Chinatown’

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that won one of the Big Five, including ‘Sunset Boulevard,’ ‘Chinatown’
This article marks Part 2 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following 11 films that scored a single prize among the top races.

More than eight decades prior to Bradley Cooper’s take on the timeless tale, the first “A Star Is Born” (1937), headlined by Fredric March and Janet Gaynor, became the third motion picture, following “Cimarron” (1931) and “It Happened One Night” (1934), to earn nominations in the Big Five Oscar categories.

At the 10th Academy Awards ceremony, however, neither March nor Gaynor emerged triumphant, losing in their
See full article at Gold Derby »

Kate Winslet movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Titanic,’ ‘Eternal Sunshine’

  • Gold Derby
Kate Winslet movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Titanic,’ ‘Eternal Sunshine’
Kate Winslet represents the third generation of actors in her family. Her grandparents ran a repertory theater in England and her father struggled for many years as an actor himself while working other jobs to support his family. Winslet however found incredible success quite early in her career and by the time she turned 30, she had already received four Oscar nominations and played the female lead in the biggest box office blockbuster Hollywood had ever seen, “Titanic.”

While success in films came easy for Winslet, the one thing that did seem to elude her for a long time was recognition from the Academy. She would have to wait through five Oscar losses before the award would finally come her away for the 2008 movie “The Reader.” She would lampoon her Oscar troubles (and ironically receive an Emmy nomination) on an episode of the Ricky Gervais comedy “Extras.” On that show Winslet
See full article at Gold Derby »

Kathryn Hahn, Two Decades Into Her Career, Is Getting the ‘Juiciest and Most Complicated’ Roles of Her Life

Kathryn Hahn, Two Decades Into Her Career, Is Getting the ‘Juiciest and Most Complicated’ Roles of Her Life
Girl Talk is a weekly look at women in film — past, present, and future.

After nearly two decades in the entertainment industry, Kathryn Hahn is upending a host of beliefs about being an actress in Hollywood: She’s a mom in her 40s, and her career is better than ever.

“It is no small thing that the juiciest and most complicated roles of my life have come post- having two children,” she said. “And that is something to listen to, and something I hope younger actresses can hear and listen to. Your creative life can continue to just turn inside out and evolve in ways that you can’t possibly imagine, whether or not you decide to be a parent. It doesn’t matter. The further you walk on, the further you grow and age, it doesn’t matter. I was so surprised by that. Really, this is a huge surprise to me.
See full article at Indiewire »

Charlton Heston movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Ben-Hur,’ ‘The Ten Commandments’

  • Gold Derby
Charlton Heston movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Ben-Hur,’ ‘The Ten Commandments’
Charlton Heston would’ve celebrated his 95th birthday on October 4, 2018. Born in 1923, the actor became a household name with leading roles in action adventures and biblical epics. But his credits extended past those two well-worn genres. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

After serving in the United States Army Air Force during WWII, Heston made his professional movie acting debut with the film noir “Dark City” (1950). His big breakthrough came just two years later with Cecil B. DeMille‘s big top soap opera “The Greatest Show on Earth” (1952), in which he played the circus manager. Though an audience favorite in its time, the film often ranks among the all-time worst Oscar winners for Best Picture.

Heston later reunited with DeMille to play the Old Testament prophet Moses in “The Ten Commandments” (1956), which brought him a Golden Globe nomination.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Bradley Cooper (‘A Star Is Born’) would be 9th person to get Best Director and Actor Oscar nominations for the same film

Bradley Cooper (‘A Star Is Born’) would be 9th person to get Best Director and Actor Oscar nominations for the same film
Bradley Cooper has probably been on cloud nine since his directorial debut “A Star Is Born” opened to gushing raves at the Venice Film Festival. “Nine” is also his magic number when it comes to the Oscars: If he gets Best Director and Best Actor nominations, as he’s expected to do, he’ll be the ninth person to be nominated for both for the same film. And if he somehow wins both, he’d be the first to do so.

The first eight men to receive these double nominations, with two having been nominated twice, are:

1. Orson Welles, “Citizen Kane” (1941)

2. Sir Laurence Olivier, “Hamlet” (1948)

3. Woody Allen, “Annie Hall” (1977)

4. Warren Beatty, “Heaven Can Wait” (1978)

5. Warren Beatty, “Reds” (1981)

6. Kenneth Branagh, “Henry V” (1989)

7. Kevin Costner, “Dances with Wolves” (1990)

8. Clint Eastwood, “Unforgiven” (1992)

9. Roberto Benigni, “Life Is Beautiful” (1998)

10. Clint Eastwood, “Million Dollar Baby” (2004)

See ‘A Star Is Born’: Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga to make Oscar history?
See full article at Gold Derby »

Charlton Heston movies: Top 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Charlton Heston movies: Top 12 greatest films ranked worst to best
Charlton Heston would’ve celebrated his 95th birthday on October 4, 2018. Born in 1923, the actor became a household name with leading roles in action adventures and biblical epics. But his credits extended past those two well-worn genres. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

After serving in the United States Army Air Force during WWII, Heston made his professional movie acting debut with the film noir “Dark City” (1950). His big breakthrough came just two years later with Cecil B. DeMille‘s big top soap opera “The Greatest Show on Earth” (1952), in which he played the circus manager. Though an audience favorite in its time, the film often ranks among the all-time worst Oscar winners for Best Picture.

Heston later reunited with DeMille to play the Old Testament prophet Moses in “The Ten Commandments” (1956), which brought him a Golden Globe nomination.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Q&A: Val Kilmer Talks ‘The Super’ and ‘Top Gun’ Sequel

  • Variety
Q&A: Val Kilmer Talks ‘The Super’ and ‘Top Gun’ Sequel
In his lengthy and varied career, Val Kilmer has played everyone from Jim Morrison to Doc Holliday to Mark Twain – in multiple projects. He’s played Moses in the lavish musical “The Ten Commandments” and voiced Kitt the car in the “Knight Rider” reboot. Along the way, he’s worked with filmmakers from Oliver Stone to Ron Howard and actors from Tom Cruise to Marlon Brando. In short, there’s no pigeonholing the actor who launched his career with broad comedies like “Top Secret!” and “Real Genius” before becoming a household name thanks to “Top Gun” – a role he’ll reprise in the upcoming sequel.

So it’s surprising to hear there’s something Kilmer hasn’t done, but that’s the case with “The Super,” which he says is his first straight-up genre thriller. Based on an idea from and produced by “Law & Order” mastermind Dick Wolf, “The Super
See full article at Variety »

Broadway Box Office Climbs To $29M; Kenneth Lonergan’s ‘The Waverly Gallery’ Joins Roster

  • Deadline
Broadway was shaking off whatever summer blues lingered last week, with an expanding roster and a 12% jump in revenue from the previous week. Total box office for Week 18 (ending Sept. 30) was $29,521,717, with attendance of 233,389 at 87% of capacity for the 29 Broadway productions.

New to the line-up was The Waverly Gallery, the Broadway premiere of Kenneth Lonergan’s 2001 Pulitzer Prize finalist starring Elaine May, Lucas Hedges, Joan Allen and Michael Cera. The new entry at the John Golden Theater played six previews, taking $307,718. Attendance of 4,208 was just shy of 90% capacity. (Opening night is Oct. 25.)

Also in previews is The Lifespan of a Fact, starring Daniel Radcliffe, Cherry Jones and Bobby Cannavale, taking $737,129 with attendance of 5,897 (about 73% capacity) at Studio 54.

Theresa Rebeck’s Bernhardt/Hamlet starring Janet McTeer opened to generally strong reviews at the American Airlines Theatre on Sept. 25. The Roundabout Theater Company’s subscription-heavy production took in $280,542, with 92% of seats filled.
See full article at Deadline »

2018 Broadway fall season preview of plays: Which will be remembered by the Tony Awards?

A new Broadway season is gearing up, and there are currently nine productions of plays set to open this fall. Could we be seeing any of them contend at next year’s Tony Awards? Below, we recap the plot of each play as well as the awards history of its author, cast and creative types and the opening and (where applicable) closing dates.

“Bernhardt/Hamlet” (opens September 25; closes November 18)

In this world premiere play by two-time Emmy nominee Theresa Rebeck, international stage actress, Sarah Bernhardt, sets out to tackle her most ambitious role yet: Hamlet.

The production presented by Roundabout Theatre Company stars Tony winner Janet McTeer, Tony nominee Dylan Baker, two-time Drama Desk nominee Jason Butler Harner, Ito Aghayere, Matthew Saldivar, Drama Desk nominee Nick Westrate, Tony Carlin, and is directed by Tony nominee Moritz von Stuelpnagel.

“The Nap” (opens September 27; closes November 11)

In the Broadway premiere of this new play by Richard Bean,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Watch Benedict Cumberbatch as Frankenstein's Monster in Theaters This October

  • MovieWeb
Watch Benedict Cumberbatch as Frankenstein's Monster in Theaters This October
Don't have any plans for the Halloween holiday? Well, now you do. If you're a super fan of Benedict Cumberbatch, you're not going to want to miss what Fathom Events has set up for October. The Doctor Strange and Sherlock star is taking on the role of Frankenstein's Monster, and it's something you're definitely not going to want to miss.

Frankenstein comes alive in U.S. Cinemas, in time for Halloween, this October for a two-night event, In celebration of the 200th Anniversary of Mary Shelley's classic novel. And here, you never thought you'd get to see Benedict Cumberbatch suffering in pain as horror's most notorious creature, built from human body parts and unleashed on an unexacting world.

Fathom Events, National Theatre Live and By Experience bring Frankenstein, first captured live in 2011 from the National Theatre stage in London, back to cinemas for a two-night event, October 22 and 29 only.
See full article at MovieWeb »

‘Bernhardt/Hamlet’ Review: Broadway’s Mighty Janet McTeer Brings Legend To Life

  • Deadline
‘Bernhardt/Hamlet’ Review: Broadway’s Mighty Janet McTeer Brings Legend To Life
Whatever combination of passion, narcissism and bravery swirl to form an actor’s decision to tackle Hamlet must merit a spot in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Short of that, we’ll have to rely on the wondrous Janet McTeer’s star turn in Theresa Rebeck’s spirited, funny new play Bernhardt/Hamlet to guide us up theater’s Mount Everest.

Opening tonight at the Roundabout Theatre Company’s American Airlines Theatre, Bernhardt/Hamlet is based on a real-life chapter in the life of legendary stage actress Sarah Bernhardt. Rebeck’s play – by turns comedy and drama – goes backstage as “the Divine Sarah” rehearses for her scandalous, much-anticipated debut as the Dane.

Weary of coasting along in one lucrative revival of Camille after another, the 55-year-old Bernhardt is risking her career, her reputation and her feeble bank account to pull up her pants and go, literally, for broke.
See full article at Deadline »

How National Theatre Brings Its Live Plays to the Movies

  • Variety
For nearly a decade, National Theatre Live has brought live theater from London’s acclaimed Royal National Theatre to a global audience, broadcasting productions such as “Hamlet” and “War Horse” via satellite to movie theaters all over the world.

“It’s unadulterated, unedited, no post-production,” says Creative Broadcast Solutions’ Chris Bretnall, who has served as National Theatre Live’s technical producer since the initiative’s inception.

The goal is “to replicate — as best as we possibly can — the experience you’re going to get seeing a play in the Lyttelton Theatre or the Olivier or the Dorfman and give you the best seat in the house in whichever country, whichever time zone you might be in,” Bretnall says.

The next play coming to U.S. movie theaters courtesy of National Theatre Live is “Julie” on Sept. 6. The modern take on August Strindberg’s 1888 play “Miss Julie” stars Vanessa Kirby and Eric Kofi Abrefa.
See full article at Variety »

Now Stream This: ‘McCabe & Mrs. Miller’, ‘Revenge’, ‘Hamlet’, ‘They Came Together’, and More

  • Slash Film
(Welcome to Now Stream This, a column dedicated to the best movies streaming on Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, and every other streaming service out there.) Another edition of Now Stream This is here to offer you a smorgasbord of streaming options! Be honest – you don’t want to leave your house. You want to stay inside and watch […]

The post Now Stream This: ‘McCabe & Mrs. Miller’, ‘Revenge’, ‘Hamlet’, ‘They Came Together’, and More appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Broadway Box Office Droops To $29M; ‘Straight White Men’ Signs Off

  • Deadline
Broadway Box Office Droops To $29M; ‘Straight White Men’ Signs Off
Bernhardt/Hamlet and The Nap braved the summer heat with Broadway previews last week as overall box office dropped about 8% to $29.5 million. Attendance for the 31 productions running during Week 15 (ending Sept. 9) was 249,078, about 85% of capacity.

In its second week of previews at American Airlines Theatre, Theresa Rebeck’s Bernhardt/Hamlet, starring the great Janet McTeer, took in $243,681 for seven performances, 45% of potential. Attendance of 4,301 was about 83% of capacity, with an average ticket going for $57. (Opening night is September 25).

The Nap, from English playwright Richard Bean and starring Ben Schnetzer and John Ellison Conlee, played its first six performances at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, grossing $106,016, a small 17% of potential, even with an average ticket price of $36. Attendance was 2,945, about 76% of capacity. The comedy thriller, directed by Daniel Sullivan, has some time to gain traction before its September 27 opening.

In the final week of its limited engagement, Straight White Men, starring Josh Charles,
See full article at Deadline »

Toronto Film Review: Julianne Moore in ‘Gloria Bell’

  • Variety
Toronto Film Review: Julianne Moore in ‘Gloria Bell’
Sebastián Lelio’s “Gloria Bell” is the second film this year to end with the Laura Branigan song “Gloria” — the kind of high-energy empowerment anthem that recasts its leading lady in a different light — the other being Netflix’s recent Gloria Allred docu “Seeing Allred.” Speaking of recasting leading ladies, it also happens to be the second of Lelio’s films to close with that song, although there’s a perfectly good explanation for that: “Gloria Bell” is a nearly scene-for-scene remake of the “A Fantastic Woman” director’s 2013 single-woman drama, this time in English and featuring Julianne Moore in the role that earned Paulina García the Berlin Film Festival’s best actress prize.

Many were skeptical when the project was announced, much as they were to the news that Jack Nicholson might star in an American version of “Toni Erdmann,” and yet Moore insisted in this case that if
See full article at Variety »

Press star Paapa Essiedu: ‘The word diversity doesn’t mean anything’

The rising British actor on representation, the elitism of theatre and the role of newspapers in 2018

It has been a few weeks since he returned from a trip to the Edinburgh fringe and actor Paapa Essiedu is talking about how “amazing” it was to “see certain stories celebrated in what has been a huge arts festival, but not necessarily a representative one”. He sighs. “As is always the case when we have this conversation, it does feel like there’s steps being made, but there are so many steps still to go.”

For many black British actors, particularly those from lower income backgrounds, the so-called “diversity debate” is one they’re often pulled into – whether they want to be or not. Instead of talk, Essiedu seems to prefer action, speaking in glowing terms about his work with Open Door, a charitable organisation that aims to widen access to drama schools
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Casting Alert: Shakespeare in Utah, Virginia Woolf in Kentucky + More Smaller Market Gigs

Plenty of creative gigs are available in smaller acting markets to start your fall off right. In Lexington, Kentucky, an Equity production of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf,” is seeking union and nonunion talent for several lead roles. Or discover a new hidden talent and perform as a Freddie Mercury lookalike in Chicago. Whatever your talent, Backstage has plenty of opportunities for you. Utah Shakespeare Festival 2019 Season, Cedar CITYJoin the Utah Shakespeare Festival for its upcoming season, which will include “Book of Will” ( written by Lauren Gunderson), “Macbeth,” “Twelfth Night,” “Hamlet,” “The Conclusion of Henry VI pt. 2 and 3,” “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” (Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice), “Every Brilliant Thing” (written by Duncan Macmillan with Jonny Donahoe), and Arthur Miller’s “The Price.” The festival is seeking male and female Equity actors, aged 18 and older. There will be an Equity principal audition on Sept. 24. Four
See full article at Backstage »

‘Sons of Anarchy’ at 10: Kurt Sutter Reflects on Biker Drama Worldbuilding and Legacy

  • Variety
‘Sons of Anarchy’ at 10: Kurt Sutter Reflects on Biker Drama Worldbuilding and Legacy
Ten years ago, “Sons of Anarchy,” Kurt Sutter’s crime drama about a gun-running motorcycle gang in the fictional town of Charming, Calif., premiered on FX. Over the course of the seven-season run that followed, the show became the top-rated show on the cable network and developed a dedicated audience on social media before concluding in 2014.

Starring Ron Perlman as Mc president Clay Morrow, and Charlie Hunnam as vice president and Clay’s stepson, the show offered up themes of brotherhood, redemption, and most of all, family. Loosely framed around the story of Shakespeare’s “Hamlet,” the members of the motorcycle club clashed with rival MCs, forged uneasy alliances with other criminal outfits, they worked constantly to earn a living while staying one step ahead of the law.

Prior to “Sons,” Sutter was working on “The Shield” for the cabler, starting as a staff writer there but ultimately promoted to executive producer.
See full article at Variety »

Carl Reiner Pays Tribute to ‘Genius’ Neil Simon: ‘The Guy With the Voice of a Turtle’ (Exclusive Video)

  • The Wrap
Carl Reiner Pays Tribute to ‘Genius’ Neil Simon: ‘The Guy With the Voice of a Turtle’ (Exclusive Video)
On Sunday, Neil Simon died at the age of 91. Carl Reiner knew and worked with Simon on “Your Show of Shows” in the early 1950s, and they were longtime friends. Reiner reflects on the memory of his friend, as told to TheWrap’s Daniel Kohn.

I first met him when he was a young writer on “Your Show of Shows.” A neophyte writer, he came with his brother, who was an established writer. And Neil was very quiet, sat quietly in the writers’ room, along with Larry Gelbart, Mel Brooks, Joe Stein, Tony Webster. He was a very quiet guy, but he had a mind like no other.

As a matter of fact, I called him “the guy with the voice of a turtle” — he talked so quietly that nobody ever heard him. Lucky for both of us, I was sitting next to him, and this was a phrase that
See full article at The Wrap »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed