7.1/10
18,537
145 user 53 critic

Brassed Off (1996)

Trailer
1:41 | Trailer
The coal mine in a northern English village may be closing, which would also mean the end of the miners' brass band.

Director:

Mark Herman

Writer:

Mark Herman
Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 10 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Pete Postlethwaite ... Danny
Tara Fitzgerald ... Gloria
Ewan McGregor ... Andy
Stephen Tompkinson ... Phil
Jim Carter ... Harry
Philip Jackson ... Jim
Peter Martin ... Ernie
Sue Johnston ... Vera
Mary Healey ... Ida
Melanie Hill ... Sandra
Lill Roughley Lill Roughley ... Rita
Peter Gunn ... Simmo
Stephen Moore ... McKenzie
Kenneth Colley ... Greasley (as Ken Colley)
Olga Grahame ... Mrs. Foggan
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Storyline

In existence for a hundred years, Grimley Colliery Brass band is as old as the mine. But the miners are now deciding whether to fight to keep the pit open, and the future for town and band looks bleak. Although the arrival of flugelhorn player Gloria injects some life into the players, and bandleader Danny continues to exhort them to continue in the national competition, frictions and pressures are all too evident. And whose side is Gloria actually on? Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Fed up with the system. Ticked off at the establishment. And mad about... each other.

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Commonly understood to be based on Grimethorpe Colliery Band, the fictional pit village of Grimley is actually an amalgamation of two neighboring South Yorkshire pit villages: Grimethorpe and Frickley. Both have internationally known brass bands. Frickley pit closed in 1993, a year after Grimethorpe. See more »

Goofs

When the brass band leave on the two coaches to the Albert Hall for the finals they are wearing blue suit jackets. When they arrive in London and have a group photo outside the Albert Hall they are wearing purple jackets. See more »

Quotes

[talking about Gloria]
Simmo: You had her. Behind the bus station.
Andy: No, I didn't.
Simmo: You told us you did.
Andy: No, it were top half only.
See more »

Crazy Credits

On some prints, the words "The End" remain onscreen as three additional lines of "definitions" are added one by one underneath: n. 1. closure (as in 140 pits since 1984) 2. termination (as in 250,000 jobs) 3. conclusion (as in draw your own...) See more »

Alternate Versions

The British release does not have the dictionary definitions at the start or end of the film. These were added to the American release to introduce the US audience to British slang. The end of the film has the same information, but just as normal text. See more »


Soundtracks

Pomp And Circumstance
Composed by Edward Elgar (as E. Elgar)
Arr. Ord Hume
Published by Boosey and Hawkes Music Publishing Limited
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User Reviews

Almost perfect
19 May 2002 | by moosicSee all my reviews

I have seen Brassed Off many times, I do in fact own it, and every time I watch it it never fails to move me. There are certain moments that stick out to me as either breath taking or harrowing.

1) That famous 'Concierto d'Aranguez' scene. The first time I saw this scene it took my breath away, literally. When used well music can move you in a way words can't. The juxtaposing of this piece of music against the union's meeting is one of them. I haven't been this moved by a piece of music with actions since then apart from the Roxan sequence in Moulin Rouge.

2) The scene where Phil loses it when playing Mr Chuckles I actually can't sit through. I have to fast forward because the emotion the Stephen Tompkinson manages to portray is so strong it's painful to watch.

Through all of this though I think my favorite scene, the aforementioned 1) excluded, is when they compete in all 14 tournaments and get completely rat arsed. The sight of these brilliant musicians trying to continue playing when they can't see straight, stop laughing, or keep their instruments in one piece is one of the most honest, amusing and humble moments in a film in recent years. there is no flashy camera work, no deeper meaning, just something that says exactly who these people are. Ordinary human beings, not super-heros, and just trying to live life whilst having fun in difficult circumstances. And you really can't play wind instruments drunk, I've tried.

The film is not perfect. It is a bit preachy, especially the end. And McGregor's accent, although he plays the part beautifully, does slip at time, especially in his longer speeches. But the humanity of the film and it's charm out way all of it's faults.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 May 1997 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Brassed Off! See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$52,534, 26 May 1997

Gross USA:

$2,576,331

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$2,576,331
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby SR

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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