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Directors' Trademarks: Wes Anderson

  • Cinelinx
Directors’ trademarks is a series of articles that examines the “signatures” that filmmakers leave behind in their work. In this installment, we’re looking at the trademark style and calling signs of Wes Anderson as director.

Growing up, Wes Anderson wanted to be a writer. He wrote plays and made movies with his father’s Super 8 camera. In college, he met Owen Wilson and they made short films together which sometimes were shown on local access television. One of those films, Bottle Rocket, was screened at the Sundance Film Festival. After the screening, Anderson received funding to make a feature length version, which became his debut film as director. Unfortunately, Bottle Rocket (1996) didn’t have much success in theaters. Regardless, a cult following began and high profile people in the industry such as Martin Scorsese and Bill Murray began to pay attention. This allowed Anderson to make his second film,
See full article at Cinelinx »

The Collider.com Podcast: Episode 138 – The Films of Wes Anderson

This week on The Collider.com Podcast, we’re going through the filmography of director Wes Anderson. We go through each of his films chronologically--Bottle Rocket, Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, The Darjeeling Limited, Fantastic Mr. Fox, Moonrise Kingdom, The Grand Budapest Hotel, and Isle of Dogs--and say where they rank on our personal lists of his films and why. We then finish up with a new, John Grisham-themed installment of Recently Watched. Listen to the latest episode of The Collider Podcast below; click here for the previous episode ("Dwayne Johnson and …
See full article at Collider.com »

Ranking The Films Of Wes Anderson

This weekend’s release of stop-motion treat Isle of Dogs marks the return of one of the greatest filmmakers working today, in my opinion: the brilliant Wes Anderson. With a limited, yet impressive, filmography under his belt and the arrival of his ninth film in cinemas, it felt like a more appropriate time than ever to take a look back at his career and rank all of his films thus far.

Related: Isle Of Dogs review [Berlinale]

It should be mentioned that I am a big fan of all of Anderson’s work; he is perhaps one of the only big-name directors yet to be swallowed whole by the blockbuster machine – there is always a wisp of excitement in the air every time he works on a new film. Ever since is debut Bottle Rocket, he has been illuminating our screens and hearts with his quirky charm and style. But, alas,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Specialty Box Office: Wes Anderson's 'Isle of Dogs' Barks Up Career-Biggest Bow

Specialty Box Office: Wes Anderson's 'Isle of Dogs' Barks Up Career-Biggest Bow
The combination of filmmaker Wes Anderson and dogs proved irresistible at the specialty box office over the weekend.

Anderson's stop-motion animated feature Isle of Dogs debuted to an estimated $1.57 million from 27 theaters in six North American cities, the biggest opening of the director's career. Nearly all of his movies have first bowed in four or fewer theaters in New York and Los Angeles, the typical course for an arthouse-minded title. (The one exception was his first film, Bottle Rocket, which opened to $124,118 from 28 theaters in 1996.)

From Fox Searchlight, Isle of Dogs impressed in delivering...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Every Film By Wes Anderson Wrapped Up in a Single Honest Trailer

Wes Anderson is one of my favorite filmmakers. I enjoyed the guy's sense of humor and his filmmaking style. I know his film's aren't for everyone, but they bring my happiness and entertainment. Now the Screen Junkies is here to make fun of his films in their recent episode of Honest Trailer thanks to the release of his new film Isle of Dogs.

This one Honest Trailer encompasses all of Wes Anderson's films including Bottle Rocket, Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums, Moonrise Kingdom, Fantastic Mr. FoxThe Grand Budapest HotelThe Darjeeling Limited,  and The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou.

Before you see the latest animated feature from your barista's favorite director, relive his meticulous works from the past that made you kind of happy, kind of sad, and kind of unsure

What is your favorite Wes Anderson movie? For me... it's Rushmore.
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Wes Anderson movies: All 9 films ranked from worst to best include ‘The Royal Tenenbaums,’ ‘Isle of Dogs’…

Wes Anderson movies: All 9 films ranked from worst to best include ‘The Royal Tenenbaums,’ ‘Isle of Dogs’…
Wes Anderson has never won an Oscar, much to the consternation of many indie film lovers. With six career nominations to his credit, he’s certainly a chief member of the Overdue Auteurs Club. But he could cash in that awards Iou with “Isle of Dogs,” an animated fantasy about a future where Japan has banished pups to a remote island to combat a strain of canine flu. It opens on Friday, March 23. Could the academy finally reward him with a Best Animated Feature win? And how does this latest effort compare to the rest of his filmography? Tour through our photo gallery above of all nine of Anderson’s films ranked from worst to best.

Anderson made his directorial debut with “Bottle Rocket” (1996), released when he was just 27-years-old. He received his first Oscar nomination five years later: Best Original Screenplay for “The Royal Tenenbaums” (2001). He followed that eight
See full article at Gold Derby »

Wes Anderson movies: All 9 films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Wes Anderson movies: All 9 films ranked from worst to best
Wes Anderson has never won an Oscar, much to the consternation of many indie film lovers. With six career nominations to his credit, he’s certainly a chief member of the Overdue Auteurs Club. But he could cash in that awards Iou with “Isle of Dogs,” an animated fantasy about a future where Japan has banished pups to a remote island to combat a strain of canine flu. It opens on Friday, March 23. Could the academy finally reward him with a Best Animated Feature win? And how does this latest effort compare to the rest of his filmography? Tour through our photo gallery above of all nine of Anderson’s films ranked from worst to best.

Anderson made his directorial debut with “Bottle Rocket” (1996), released when he was just 27-years-old. He received his first Oscar nomination five years later: Best Original Screenplay for “The Royal Tenenbaums” (2001). He followed that eight
See full article at Gold Derby »

Isle of Dogs Review: Wes Anderson’s Latest is A Heartwarming Tale

Writer and director Wes Anderson first made a name for himself with his 1996 debut Bottle Rocket. In the two decades since, Anderson has continued to develop his own unique directorial style matched with an offbeat humor that’s all his own. With a number of critical darlings under his belt – including, but not limited to, The Royal Tenenbaums, The Darjeeling Limited, Moonrise Kingdom, and The Grand Budapest Hotel – Anderson now returns to stop-motion for Isle of Dogs. He previously ventured into this territory for his 2009 film, Fantastic Mr. Fox, which similarly earned him incredibly positive reviews. Isle of Dogs infuses writer-director Wes Anderson’s signature humor in an offbeat, but still heartwarming story about a boy and his dog(s).
See full article at Screen Rant »

Wes Anderson Honest Trailer: ‘Your Barista’s Favorite Director’ and His ‘Own Genre’ Get a Massive Video Breakdown

Wes Anderson Honest Trailer: ‘Your Barista’s Favorite Director’ and His ‘Own Genre’ Get a Massive Video Breakdown
Sally forth and talley ho! It’s time for an apparently long-gestasting (and at least eponymously “honest”) look inside the full filmography of Wes Anderson. This time, the filmmaker’s entire oeuvre is up for examination, from “Bottle Rocket” to “Fantastic Mr. Fox, “Rushmore” to “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” and everything in between.

In the nearly seven-minute-long video, the Honest Trailers team unpacks Anderson’s many quirks and obsessions — emotionally stunted men, fraught familial relationships, kicky duds, just really meticulously made sets — and finds still more connections. Watch out: you’re about to hear to the word “disaffected” approximately 342 times.

As is so often the case with Honest Trailers, the findings are a mix of the pointed and the just kind of polite, and while Anderson’s style is ease to spot, the video does amusingly point out a few of his tropes you might have forgotten about over the course of eight films (listen,
See full article at Indiewire »

Poll: What’s the Best Wes Anderson Movie?

Poll: What’s the Best Wes Anderson Movie?
With “Isle of Dogs,” Wes Anderson is about to release his ninth movie, with a star-studded cast voicing a pack of quarantined canines.

His career first launched with “Bottle Rocket” in 1996, with Luke and Owen Wilson helping him turn his eponymous short into a feature. While it was praised by critics, it crashed at the box office. He followed it up with “Rushmore,” which began his long-running collaboration with Bill Murray.

In 2001, “The Royal Tenenbaums” earned Anderson his first Oscar nomination for the screenplay he wrote with Owen Wilson. It also represented one of his biggest commercial successes, grossing $71 million worldwide. His next film, however, “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou,” was less of a boon. It grossed only $34 million on a $50 million budget, and received mixed reviews from critics.

The release of his next feature, 2007’s “The Darjeeling Limited,” went a little better. While it grossed only $35 million worldwide,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs to Get China Release

Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs is getting a theatrical release in China. Since the release of 1996’s Bottle Rocket, Anderson has been entertaining American moviegoers with his quirky and endearing filmmaking. He’s also gained a loyal international fanbase, too, given the universal appeal of his productions. But Anderson’s films have never been theatrically distributed in a certain Asian country – something that will soon change.
See full article at Screen Rant »

Canon Of Film: ‘The Royal Tenenbaums’

In this edition of Canon Of Film, we honor the release of ‘Isle of Dogs‘ by taking a look at Wes Anderson‘s modern classic, ‘The Royal Tenenbaums‘. For the story behind the genesis of the Canon, you can click here.

The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)

Director: Wes Anderson

Screenplay: Wes Anderson and Owen Wilson

I can’t be the only person who considers ‘The Royal Tenenbaums‘ to easily be Wes Anderson’s best film, but it seems like I am most days. I’ve heard arguments from other people for pretty much all his other movies, yet I’m the one who always had to make the argument for ‘The Royal Tenenbaums‘. Which surprises me because I think most of his other films severely lack in comparison to ‘The Royal Tenenbaums,‘ which gets more evolving, more moving, and funnier on every viewing. Even his best other films like ‘Bottle Rocket‘ and
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

‘Isle of Dogs’ Cast Interviews As Their Stop-Motion Counterparts

The March 23rd release of Wes Anderson’s new stop-motion film Isle of Dogs is quickly approaching. The marketing via Fox Searchlight has been making the rounds and it is quite unique. This five-minute clip features various actors talking about their characters and the process of making the film animated as their on-screen counterparts. This is a beautiful and interesting way to promote a movie by adding depth to what can often feel like generic studio interviews.

Isle of Dogs is Wes Anderson’s followup to the 2014 hit The Grand Budapest Hotel. This marks the second time Anderson has dabbled in the stop-motion world, after 2009’s Fantastic Mr. Fox. Like him or not, Anderson has delivered a unique feel and vision to his films since his 1996 debut Bottle Rocket.

The casts of Anderson’s films are always as extensive as they are prestigious, and Dogs is no exception. There’s
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

'Bottle Rocket': THR's 1996 Review

'Bottle Rocket': THR's 1996 Review
On Feb. 21, 1996, Wes Anderson's R-rated feature debut Bottle Rocket, starring Owen and Luke Wilson, hit theaters. The Hollywood Reporter's original review of the crime caper is below: 

A marvelous debut film for its director, writer and lead actors, Bottle Rocket is propelled by a fresh approach to the caper genre, with a trio of youthful Texan misfits thoroughly botching their half-baked "adventures," with the goal of someday graduating to more ambitious levels of criminality. 

A slyly entertaining comedy with no established marquee names except James Caan in a limited supporting role, the non-violent and only sweetly romantic Sony Pictures...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Exclusive Interview – Cinematographer Robert Yeoman talks about Bottle Rocket and his longterm collaboration with Wes Anderson

Rachael Kaines chats with cinematographer Robert Yeoman about working with Wes Anderson

It’s been two decades since the release of Wes Anderson’s first feature film, Bottle Rocket (1996) and a lot has changed for the people involved. The film follows Anthony (Luke Wilson) and Dignan (Owen Wilson) as they fail to pull off various ill-conceived heists, then go on the run. The film was written by Wes Anderson and Owen Wilson and is full of hints of what would come to define Wes Anderson’s movies.

The film also marked the beginning of a long-running collaboration between Anderson and Robert Yeoman, the cinematographer for Bottle Rocket, who has now directed the photography of every live-action Anderson film. Robert was approached to do the cinematography on Bottle Rocket by Wes, who sent him a hand-written note asking him to read the script (Yeoman had done the cinematography for Drugstore Cowboy,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Robert Yeoman Looks Back on Filming Six Wes Anderson Films: ‘We Always Find a Way of Pulling it Off’

Robert Yeoman Looks Back on Filming Six Wes Anderson Films: ‘We Always Find a Way of Pulling it Off’
If you consider yourself a Wes Anderson, then you’re also a Robert Yeoman fan by default. The cinematographer has been behind the camera for every live-action movie Anderson has ever shot, from his directorial debut “Bottle Rocket” through his three-time Oscar winner “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” and he has thus helped Anderson hone and perfect his beloved directing style. The Telegraph recently spoke with Yeoman about shooting six Anderson films, and the Dp was eager to share set stories from each film.

Read More:Wes Anderson Movies Ranked From Worst To Best

“So many times he would say to me, ‘Oh, this is the kind of shot I’m looking for,’ and I’ll think to myself, ‘How am I going to do that?’ and it’s impossible!” Yeoman told The Telegraph about working with Anderson. “But we always find a way of doing it, and that’s a big
See full article at Indiewire »

Owen Wilson interview: Wonder, art in movies

Ben Mortimer Nov 30, 2017

Owen Wilson chats to us about Wonder, art, writing and more...

Wonder. It started life as an extraordinary book from R J Palacio, and it's now been turned into a hugely impressive film as well. Already a hit in the Us, the movie stars Julia Roberts and Owen Wilson. And on the UK press tour for the movie, Wilson spared us some time to talk about the film...

[As I enter, I notice that Wilson is reading a book about Van Gogh. I make a comment about this just as I’m setting my Dictaphone to record]

Yeah, I just picked it up off the nightstand. But I’ve been there, to the museum in Amsterdam. Do you have a favourite Van Gogh painting?

Not particularly, Van Gogh. I’m more of a Dali fan.

Very trippy.

Have you been to any of the galleries in London while you’ve been here?

I went to go see the Basquiat show, over at the Barbican.

There was a good documentary on Basquiat recently.

My friend, [art dealer] Tony Shafrazi,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Harvey Weinstein Accusations: How Film Festival Environments Provided a Backdrop For Sexual Assault

Harvey Weinstein Accusations: How Film Festival Environments Provided a Backdrop For Sexual Assault
In 1995, Harvey Weinstein tried to give Mira Sorvino a massage, chasing her around the room when she rebuffed him. In 1996, he sexually assaulted rising French actress Judith Godrèche in a hotel room; a year later, he had another incident with Rose McGowan. In 2008, actress Louisette Geiss fled a hotel room where Weinstein tried to get her to watch him masturbate. In 2010, he tricked another French actress, Emma de Caunes, into visiting a hotel room where he exposed himself and tried to get her lie down.

In all of these accounts, Weinstein seemed to think that the relative privacy of the hotel room provided him with a sanctuary in which he could perform deplorable acts on whomever he pleased, but the context was more specific than that: In every instance, he was at a film festival.

Read More:Harvey Weinstein Is Done: After 30 Years of Abusive Behavior, the Mogul Lies in
See full article at Indiewire »

How an Independent Filmmaker Went From Being the Farrelly Brothers’ Assistant to Making the Movies That Studios Wouldn’t

How an Independent Filmmaker Went From Being the Farrelly Brothers’ Assistant to Making the Movies That Studios Wouldn’t
Editor’s note: Nearly 20 years after making his feature directorial debut, Josh Klausner’s latest feature film, the musical “Wanderland,” is set for its world premiere. Klausner’s path from indie film and back again is a unique one, including stopovers in the studio world alongside big names like Peter and Bobby Farrelly, Paul McCartney, and Shrek himself.

We asked Klausner to reflect on his career so far, and what’s next for a filmmaker who has never taken the easy way.

My path to directing “Wanderland” was a bit like the rambling journey its main character Alex takes over the course of the movie. For me, it was about stepping off the path I was on as a studio screenwriter to reengage again as an independent filmmaker.

You’d never know it from “Shrek Forever After” or “Date Night,” but I always believed I’d primarily work in the world of independent film.
See full article at Indiewire »

Bottle Rocket and Make-a-Wish make a child’s video game idea become reality

A new game based on a 11 year old boy’s vision arrived on the Apple App Store today thanks to a partnership between Make-a-Wish and Texas based developer, Bottle Rocket. Planet Sram is the brainchild of Hunter, a young boy with a severe heart condition who shared his idea with the team at Bottle Rocket for a single player action game where survival is key.

Planet Sram is a top down action game that takes players to a strange alien planet filled with “out-of-this-world” characters and monsters (such as a tree monster that fires snakes at your player). Players are not without protection and a number of weapons and cool upgrades. All the creatures and game levels have been imagined by Hunter and were shared with the developers during a full week of whiteboard sketching, feature ideation and game development.

“When we first heard the story of Hunter and his wish,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »
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