Cold Lazarus (1996) - News Poster

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Clare Douglas obituary

My friend Clare Douglas, who has died aged 73, was a Bafta award-winning film editor of memorable television programmes.

She worked on the adaptation of John le Carré’s Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1979), Dennis Potter’s films Blackeyes (1989), Secret Friends (1991), Lipstick on Your Collar (1993), Karaoke (1996) and the four-parter Cold Lazarus (1996), directed by Renny Rye and starring Albert Finney as the writer Daniel Feeld.

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Clare Douglas obituary

My friend Clare Douglas, who has died aged 73, was a Bafta award-winning film editor of memorable television programmes.

She worked on the adaptation of John le Carré’s Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1979), Dennis Potter’s films Blackeyes (1989), Secret Friends (1991), Lipstick on Your Collar (1993), Karaoke (1996) and the four-parter Cold Lazarus (1996), directed by Renny Rye and starring Albert Finney as the writer Daniel Feeld.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

A celebration of disembodied brains and heads in the movies

Ryan Lambie Jul 14, 2016

We take a look at some of the most memorable and freaky floating brains and flying heads in the history of cinema...

Nb: The following contains spoilers for The Brain From The Planet Arous and Prometheus.

For some reason we've yet to discover, cinema has, for decades, been home to all manner of sentient, disembodied heads and floating brains. Note that we’re not talking about decapitations here - though goodness knows that cinema is home to plenty of those, from Japanese samurai epics to modern slasher horrors.

No, we’re talking about movies where heads and brains remain sentient even when they’re stuffed into jars or colossal things made of stone. Sometimes used for comedic effect, at other times for shock value, they’re a surprisingly common phenomenon in the movies. Here, we celebrate a few of our absolute favourites - though you’re sure
See full article at Den of Geek »

Synthesisers are killing film and TV music, say British composers

Carl Davis and Christopher Gunning claim synthesised orchestras are preferred to the real thing to save money

Two of Britain's leading film composers warn that the quality of music for film and TV is suffering because synthesised sounds are increasingly replacing real instruments in an effort to cut costs.

Carl Davis, whose scores include that for the World at War documentary series, said a synthesised soundtrack lacked "the heart" of symphonic or instrumental music.

Christopher Gunning, who wrote the Bafta-winning score for La Vie en Rose, about Edith Piaf, was even more critical: "A lot of television music has got to the stage where I have to turn it off. There's an enormous amount of programmes where I find the programme content really quite interesting, but can't watch because I find the music so blooming irritating. Part of that is, I am afraid, the poor quality of the musical composition.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Synthesisers are killing film and TV music, say British composers

Carl Davis and Christopher Gunning claim synthesised orchestras are preferred to the real thing to save money

Two of Britain's leading film composers warn that the quality of music for film and TV is suffering because synthesised sounds are increasingly replacing real instruments in an effort to cut costs.

Carl Davis, whose scores include that for the World at War documentary series, said a synthesised soundtrack lacked "the heart" of symphonic or instrumental music.

Christopher Gunning, who wrote the Bafta-winning score for La Vie en Rose, about Edith Piaf, was even more critical: "A lot of television music has got to the stage where I have to turn it off. There's an enormous amount of programmes where I find the programme content really quite interesting, but can't watch because I find the music so blooming irritating. Part of that is, I am afraid, the poor quality of the musical composition.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Clive James: The Kid from Kogarah – TV review

Wisdom and wonder in an interview singing with gratitude, plus the joy of experiences recollected in the fading light

It's almost 20 years since Melvyn Bragg recorded his classic interview with Dennis Potter at Channel 4's London studio. Fortified by flutes of champagne – Potter's laced with morphine – the pair cheerily discussed the esteemed writer's imminent demise, the substance of his life's work and determination to complete two last scripts.

Three months later, the lymphoma – dubbed Rupert by the author – terminated a brilliant career. But not before the Gloucestershire writer had wrapped up those final works, Cold Lazarus and Karaoke.

In late June, Kerry O'Brien travelled to Cambridge to record a valedictory conversation with another significant writer and television identity, Clive James. Born four years after Potter, the "kid from Kogarah" is in steep decline as a consequence of emphysema and leukemia but, like Potter in 1994, fronts up chipper, sanguine and
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

TV highlights 08/03/2012

  • The Guardian - TV News
David Walliams' Big Swim: A Sport Relief Special | White Heat | Pramface | Catholics | The Sarah Millican Television Programme | The Singing Detective

David Walliams' Big Swim: A Sport Relief Special

9pm, BBC1

After conquering the channel and cycling the length of the UK in previous Sport Reliefs, 2011 saw David Walliams attempt a brutal eight-day, 140-mile swim along the murky waters of the Thames. This hour-long special documents Walliams' journey, from Gloucester all the way to Westminster Bridge. As one might suspect, the level of sewage in the Thames does unpleasant things to the body, yet his sheer joy at completing the task makes for heartwarming TV. Gwilym Mumford

White Heat

9pm, BBC2

Our friends in the south? It's 1965 and charismatic student Jack wants to "construct a model of living based on equality". In other words, he's a well-heeled rebel with a flat in Tufnell Park to let out. Enter a
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Cinema’s 10 greatest disembodied brains and heads

We provide a rundown of ten of the most memorable and freaky floating brains and flying heads in the history of cinema...

For some reason I've yet to discover, cinema has, for decades, been home to all manner of sentient, disembodied heads and floating brains. From massive flying stone heads to telekinetic, evil brains from other planets, this list is devoted to the most memorable instances of this peculiar movie phenomenon...

The Brain From The Planet Arous (1957)

It's been several years since I've seen the sci-fi B-movie, The Brain From Planet Arous, but one thing is still clear in my mind: that it features a large disembodied alien brain, a criminal brain, no less, that comes to Earth to control the population with its psychic powers.

The brain, called Gor, seizes control of Steve, a nuclear scientist, who becomes a randy "regular caveman" under the alien's influence. With Steve as his puppet,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Cinema’s 10 greatest disemembodied brains and heads

We provide a rundown of ten of the most memorable and freaky floating brains and flying heads in the history of cinema...

For some reason I've yet to discover, cinema has, for decades, been home to all manner of sentient, disembodied heads and floating brains. From massive flying stone heads to telekinetic, evil brains from other planets, this list is devoted to the most memorable instances of this peculiar movie phenomenon...

The Brain From The Planet Arous (1957)

It's been several years since I've seen the sci-fi B-movie, The Brain From Planet Arous, but one thing is still clear in my mind: that it features a large disembodied alien brain, a criminal brain, no less, that comes to Earth to control the population with its psychic powers.

The brain, called Gor, seizes control of Steve, a nuclear scientist, who becomes a randy "regular caveman" under the alien's influence. With Steve as his puppet,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Nancy Banks-Smith: classic TV reviews

The TV critic's greatest hits, from Tarzan to the death of Vera Duckworth. Click on the programme titles to read her full reviews and watch clips

Tarzan

Good morning. If that's not a contradiction in terms. I am not at my best before midnight. Though, as there is no one around at night to notice, this has led to the assumption that I have no best. We are coming to television. Do relax. I felt my way downstairs in an unfocused fashion about 10am, with some somnambulistic intention of watching the start of colour on all channels.

Tarzan, this massive suntanned chap wearing a small doormat, was rippling his pectorals all over my living room. It quite upset me. I've had colour television for more than two years now. I've grown accustomed to its stunning face, and have even learnt to listen to what it is saying. For initially, the effect of colour is deafening.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

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