Waterworld (1995) - News Poster

(1995)

News

PSA: Leo From The Bachelorette Was on American Horror Story

PSA: Leo From The Bachelorette Was on American Horror Story
We knew that The Bachelorette's Leo Dottavio - aka the beefy dude with cascading waves of glorious curly hair - was a stuntman based in Studio City, CA. What we didn't know was that the 31-year-old, who's vying for Becca's hand in marriage, has appeared in a handful of notable TV shows and movies.

After digging around a bit, we discovered his IMDb page, which revealed that Leo (whose full name is actually Leandro) made an appearance as a "Kai Supporter" on American Horror Story: Cult. Essentially, he was a follower of a cult run by a man named Kai (played by Evan Peters). We rewatched the episode, but couldn't spot him. It's possible that he's under one of the masks worn by the cult of murderers - but we may never know!

Leo also appeared as a stunt performer in the Brad Pitt film Moneyball, Smilf on Showtime,
See full article at Popsugar »

PSA: Leo From The Bachelorette Was on American Horror Story

We knew that The Bachelorette's Leo Dottavio - aka the beefy dude with cascading waves of glorious curly hair - was a stuntman based in Studio City, CA. What we didn't know was that the 31-year-old, who's vying for Becca's hand in marriage, has appeared in a handful of notable TV shows and movies.

After digging around a bit, we discovered his IMDb page, which revealed that Leo (whose full name is actually Leandro) made an appearance as a "Kai Supporter" on American Horror Story: Cult. Essentially, he was a follower of a cult run by a man named Kai (played by Evan Peters). We rewatched the episode, but couldn't spot him. It's possible that he's under one of the masks worn by the cult of murderers - but we may never know!

Leo also appeared as a stunt performer in the Brad Pitt film Moneyball, Smilf on Showtime,
See full article at BuzzSugar »

"Sub-Mariner" Swimming Back To Marvel ?

What if... the movie screen rights to Marvel Comics' 'Atlantean' superhero "Namor: The Sub-Mariner" returned to Marvel from Universal, allowing a big budget "Sub-Mariner" undersea adventure that could make DC's "Aquaman" look like 'Charlie The Tuna'?:

"I can't speak for the studios," said Marvel's Joe Quesada about Disney recovering screen rights to Namor from Universal.

"But as far as I know, yeah we do (have screen rights). It’s not at Fox, it’s not at Sony...Yeah."

"Yes," confirmed Marvel Studios' Kevin Feige about Marvel controlling screen rights to Namor, "but it’s slightly more complicated than that."

"Let’s put it this way – there are entanglements that make it less easy.

"There are older contracts that still involve other parties that means we need to work things out before we move forward on it.

"...as opposed to an 'Iron Man' or any
See full article at SneakPeek »

Jimmy Nickerson Dies: Veteran Hollywood Stuntman On ‘Rocky’, ‘Raging Bull’, & Dozens Of Others

Jimmy Nickerson, a veteran Hollywood stuntman who performed and/or coordinated stunts on more than 70 films and TV shows spanning 30-plus years, has died. He was 68. He died May 4, but no other details were available. A 1985 inductee into the Hollywood Stuntmen's Hall of Fame, Nickerson’s long list of stunt credits includes Rocky, Rocky II, Raging Bull, Lethal Weapon, Gladiator, Waterworld, Fight Club, True Lies, Last Action Hero, Batman & Robin, Con Air, Volcano, Crimson…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Jimmy Nickerson Dies: Veteran Hollywood Stuntman On ‘Rocky’, ‘Raging Bull’, & Dozens Of Others

Jimmy Nickerson, a veteran Hollywood stuntman who performed and/or coordinated stunts on more than 70 films and TV shows spanning 30-plus years, has died. He was 68. He died May 4, but no other details were available. A 1985 inductee into the Hollywood Stuntmen's Hall of Fame, Nickerson’s long list of stunt credits includes Rocky, Rocky II, Raging Bull, Lethal Weapon, Gladiator, Waterworld, Fight Club, True Lies, Last Action Hero, Batman & Robin, Con Air, Volcano, Crimson…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Shailene Woodley and Sam Claflin Are Lovers Lost at Sea in Adrift Trailer

Shailene Woodley and Sam Claflin Are Lovers Lost at Sea in Adrift Trailer
It's Titanic meets The Perfect Storm meets Waterworld.  In the new film Adrift, whose trailer was released on Wednesday, Shailene Woodley and Sam Claflin play romantic couple Tami Oldham and Richard Sharp, who sail together on a yacht from Tahiti to California and get caught in what would become one of the most catastrophic hurricanes in history, gravely injuring Sharp and damaging their boat. The movie's plot is inspired by a true story. In the trailer, their yacht is seen riding down massive waves, while Woodley's character is seen rescuing Claflin's after he is thrown overboard during the storm, desperately trying to call for help, comforting and kissing her lover on board and...
See full article at E! Online »

‘Love’ Season 3 Review: With Its Final Season, This Enjoyable Rom-Com Proves the Importance of Moving On

  • Indiewire
In real life, the end of a love story is rarely a happy one, which is why perhaps it’s good that Netflix’s “Love” has chosen to wrap things up. The third season of the series created by Paul Rust, Lesley Arfin, and Judd Apatow has always had a grounded, near-cynical take on what it means to seek out romance in modern-day Los Angeles. But the series has always been, like many Apatow joints, easy to consume even when things get brutally awkward, thanks to the pervasive tone of an indie romantic comedy (something that may be the result of its director roster including Joe Swanberg, Lynn Shelton, and Michael Showalter).

Of course, the difference between “Love” and your typical indie rom-com is that with 34 half-hour episodes as opposed to an hour and a half of runtime to fill, the story of Mickey (Gillian Jacobs) and Gus (Rust), two
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Empire of the Sharks’ DVD Review

Stars: John Savage, Jack Amstrong, Thandi Sebe, Ashley de Lange, Leandie du Randt, Tauriq Jenkins, Tapiwa Musvosvi, Camilla Waldman, Jonathan Pienaar, Joe Vaz, Sandi Schultz, Melodie Abad, Royston Stoffels, Philip Tan, Neels van Jaarsveld | Written and Directed by Mark Atkins

In the future, 98% of the Earth is covered by water and the only land is controlled by a warlord and his army of sharks. Humans are kept as food for the sharks until two friends risk their lives – one of whom is a “shark caller” with a supernatural ability to talk to sharks Fyi(!) – to rise against their captor and his legion of sharks.

Hold on, hold on… So we have a world covered in water. What water there is happens to be over run by sharks. And people live on floating islands, a la Waterworld, to survive. Errr, haven’t we seen this before? I think so! In fact,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

‘Everything Sucks!’: How Blockbuster and Ace of Base Heighten the Emotional Ending — Spoilers

I’m not sure if you noticed, but “Everything Sucks!” takes place in the ’90s. I know, I know. It’s quite a revelation, given how subtly the new Netflix comedy incorporates its period appropriate props and dialogue. But among the many, many casual and clunky references to an emerging narrative source of millennial nostalgia, two nods to the decade that gave us the Macarena and Crystal Pepsi are actually, you know, important.

[Editor’s Note: The following article contains spoilers for “Everything Sucks!” Season 1, including the ending.]

And they both occur around the same time: Near the end of the first season, the Av and Drama clubs of Boring High School take an unexpected field trip to Dominguez Rocks, a canyon nestled northwest of Santa Clarita, CA. (Sadly, there’s no synergistic Drew Barrymore cameo.) They’re on a mission to complete their school movie, but the key references have nothing to do with blue aliens and low-budget special effects.

What first stands out is Blockbuster.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Love’ Season 3 Trailer: The Final Season Promises that Romance ‘Is Never Boring’ — Watch

‘Love’ Season 3 Trailer: The Final Season Promises that Romance ‘Is Never Boring’ — Watch
The story of Mickey (Gillian Jacobs) and Gus (Paul Rust) is finally coming to an end. The two have been on an up-and-down ride throughout the first two seasons of “Love,” their relationship serving as an honest and down-to-earth look at dating and all its complications. Season 2 left them in a situation that was equally promising and uncertain, and only time will tell whether the two will last as a couple — because in Season 3, their lives are as chaotic as ever.

Relationship status aside, the laughs are sure to continue in the final season. “I am really excited about the third season,” co-creator Judd Apatow said in a December 2017 press release from Netflix. “I think it is our sweetest, funniest season and ends our story in a beautiful way.”

“We couldn’t have hoped for better companions to go on this journey…with than the incomparable Judd Apatow, Gillian Jacobs,
See full article at Indiewire »

Business Savvy Stars Determined to Get Richer

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Michael Walsh

Steve Carell” (Cc By-sa 2.0) by Eva Rinaldi Celebrity and Live Music Photographer

You’d think that commanding millions of dollars a movie would be enough for most stars, along with all the fame and adulation that this brings. But plenty of them obviously also live on the principle that you’re only as good as your last performance so they’re hedging their bets by having a sideline going on.

For some, this means keeping a close eye on how the stock market doing. For others, it means taking on entrepreneurial ventures such as opening a restaurant or bar. But for all of them it means that when the offers finally stop coming in, they’ve got something to fall back on.

William Shatner

The original captain of the USS Starship Enterprise certainly chose to boldly go into stocks and shares when he agreed to take stock
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Horror-On-Sea 2018 Interview: Jack Armstrong talks ‘Empire of the Sharks’

Following the showing of Empire of the Sharks at Horror-on-Sea I got a chance to talk with actor Jack Armstrong about how he got involved in the film, what attracted him to the role and what it was like working on the set of the film.

Photo courtesy of J.Douglas Imagery

We have come out from the screening for Empire of the Sharks, how do you think it went?

It went really well, it was good to see it on the big screen for the first time. I have seen it once or twice before, but to see it with the directors and the people who made it so special is the right way to see it I would say.

How did you get involved in the film originally?

It s a very funny story actually. I was on Facebook and something popped up from Actors UK because my friend had commented on it,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

10 Things About The Shawshank Redemption You Never Knew

10 Things About The Shawshank Redemption You Never Knew
The Shawshank Redemption. It's one of the best Stephen King adaptations ever made, forever linked to the already impressive filmographies of Tim Robbins and Morgan Freeman. Here we look at 10 things you never knew about The Shawshank Redemption.

It's not a biopic.

Ok, of course this is something you already knew about The Shawshank Redemption but as the movie was gearing up for production, this was actually very unclear. Frank Darabont had to shorten the movie's name from King's original title, Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption, after agents kept pitching actresses for the lead.

Stephen King licensed the story for a dollar.

Since 1976, the prolific author has offered the Dollar Baby deal. The Master of Horror will let aspiring filmmakers adapt his short stories for a single U.S. dollar. Contrary to how some have interpreted this, King still retains the rights to the stories. It's more of a license for noncommercial use.
See full article at MovieWeb »

A Future of ‘Flatliners’: 5 Bad ’90s Movies That Hollywood Should Remake for Millennials

  • Indiewire
A Future of ‘Flatliners’: 5 Bad ’90s Movies That Hollywood Should Remake for Millennials
This Friday will see the release of a horror film called “Flatliners,” a movie title that should be instantly familiar to anyone who spent the ’90s trawling the shelves of their local video store in search of something — anything — to watch that weekend. Perhaps best remembered as the crusty VHS that was always sandwiched between “The Fisher King” and “Fried Green Tomatoes,” the original “Flatliners” was an asinine but atmospheric psychological horror thing that starred Kiefer Sutherland, Julia Roberts, Kevin Bacon, Oliver Platt, and Billy Baldwin as foolhardy med students who start experimenting with life after death. Nothing goes wrong and they all live happily ever after.

Now, perhaps motivated by the fact that the mere act of making a movie in 2017 feels like an experiment with life after death, Hollywood is about to unleash a remake starring Ellen Page, Diego Luna, Nina Dobrev, James Norton, and Kiersey Clemons. Directed by Niels Arden Oplev,
See full article at Indiewire »

Marvel's "Sub-Mariner" Makes A Splash

  • SneakPeek
With screen rights to Marvel Comics' 'Atlantean' superhero "Namor: The Sub-Mariner" returning to the Marvel fold, a big budget "Sub-Mariner" feature could make DC's "Aquaman" look like 'Charlie The Tuna':

"I can't speak for the studios," said Marvel's Joe Quesada about Disney recovering screen rights to Namor from Universal.

"But as far as I know, yeah we do (have screen rights). It’s not at Fox, it’s not at Sony...Yeah."

"Yes," confirmed Marvel Studios' Kevin Feige about Marvel controlling screen rights to Namor, "but it’s slightly more complicated than that."

"Let’s put it this way – there are entanglements that make it less easy.

"There are older contracts that still involve other parties that means we need to work things out before we move forward on it.

"...as opposed to an 'Iron Man' or any of the 'Avengers' or any of the other Marvel characters
See full article at SneakPeek »

Waterworld: what it was like before it was a $175m epic

Ryan Lambie Jul 24, 2017

It was a legendarily expensive action vehicle for Kevin Costner in 1995, but Waterworld originally began life as a subtly different story...

Tales of Waterworld's making have long since passed into legend. You've probably read about the long and difficult shoot on the open seas around Hawaii, about the soaring costs, the sinking sets and the increasingly fractious relationship between the two Kevins - director Kevin Reynolds and star Kevin Costner. You've probably heard about a pre-Buffy Joss Whedon being flown in to revise the script, and how, getting wind of all this, the Hollywood press started calling Waterworld names like "Fishtar and "Kevin's Gate".

See related Vikings renewed for season 5

What's less commonly discussed is just where Waterworld came from. It's often reported that the screenplay was written by Peter Rader and later reworked by David Twohy; what's less widely known is that Waterworld could
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Star Wars’ Han Solo Spinoff: Lord & Miller Firing Is Latest in Long Line of Director Exits

‘Star Wars’ Han Solo Spinoff: Lord & Miller Firing Is Latest in Long Line of Director Exits
Directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller were dumped from the Han Solo spinoff film this week after more than four months of production, an unusually late date to make a shift behind the camera. That leaves the “Star Wars” production scrambling to find a replacement with weeks left of shooting and a scheduled five weeks of reshoots coming later this summer, an unenviable position for one of the biggest franchises in the entertainment industry and all involved.

The film, which is still untitled, isn’t the first to change its director in midstream. Classics such as “Gone With the Wind” and “Wizard of Oz” cycled through filmmakers, while duds like “The 13th Warrior” and “The Island of Dr. Moreau” also brought in fresh blood in the middle of shooting. But despite plenty of precedents, Lord and Miller’s firing is setting tongues wagging.

“It has certainly happened on a number of occasions, but not under such scrutiny and not usually this far into production,” said Leonard Maltin, a film critic and historian.

Frequently, a director is dropped after he finds himself on the losing end of a power struggle. During “Gone With the Wind,” Clark Gable pushed to have George Cukor replaced with Victor Fleming because Gable felt that the filmmaker was paying too much attention to his co-star, Vivien Leigh. While shooting “Spartacus,” Kirk Douglas used his clout to have Anthony Mann replaced with Stanley Kubrick because he believe that his hand-picked substitute could better handle the film’s epic scope. And in “Waterworld” it was Kevin Costner, and not credited director Kevin Reynolds, who handled the film’s final cut after the two clashed on the notoriously troubled and costly production.

Related

Why Movies Need Directors Like Phil Lord and Chris Miller More Than Ever

More recently, Steven Soderbergh left “Moneyball” due to his desire to shoot documentary-style, while Pixar parted ways with the the directors of several of its films, from “Ratatouille” to the “Brave” to “The Good Dinosaur,” over differing creative ideas about the animated offerings. In most cases, these movies survived their filmmaking shuffles to succeed financially and artistically, proving that a rocky path to the big screen does not necessarily foretell doom.

That’s to say nothing of the pictures whose financial backers probably wished in retrospect that they’d pulled the plug on a director. Costly overruns on “Heaven’s Gate,” Michael Cimino’s brooding Western epic, essentially bankrupted United Artists, and Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s “Cleopatra” went so egregiously over budget that it brought Fox to the brink of financial ruin. Perhaps another filmmaker would have been able to rein in some of the spending?

But there are reasons why studios have historically been loathe to make a change after cameras start rolling.

“Once a film begins production it’s a runaway train and the backers of the film are reluctant to remove the conductor from the train for fear of it being even more of a disaster,” said Howard Suber, a professor of film history at UCLA. “It becomes a decision between cutting your losses and possibly starting all over again or hoping that things somehow are able to get better.”

It’s harder to overhaul a project without drawing a lot of scrutiny. In the days of “The Wizard of Oz” or “Gone With the Wind,” the public wasn’t as versed in film production — studios might expect a report of a production shakeup in a trade paper such as Variety, but it rarely filtered out across the mass media. That’s no longer the case. From Entertainment Tonight to the New York Times to Twitter, news of Lord and Miller’s ouster was ubiquitous this week.

“The public is now reading about controversies on films and who gets hired here and who gets fired there,” said Dana Polan, professor of cinema studies at Nyu. “That was not a thing before.”

In the case of the Han Solo spinoff shakeup, insiders say that Lord and Miller clashed with Lucasfilm chief Kathleen Kennedy and writer and executive producer Lawrence Kasdan over their vision for the film and its execution. Lord and Miller wanted to inject more cheekiness into the “Star Wars” universe and encouraged improvisation on set. Kasdan and Kennedy believed in adhering more tightly to the script and were concerned that the directors were deviating too far from the franchise’s “house style.” They preferred something that was more reverent, which they might get if Ron Howard or Joe Johnston, both rumored to be in the running for the gig, take over as director.

The Lord and Miller firing is also a reminder of a new cinematic reality. Auteur theory, a popular school of thought in film criticism, once held that the director is the true author of a film because he or she makes the key audio and visual decisions. That view was given so much credence that 1980’s “The Stunt Man” offered up Peter O’Toole as a God-like film director, an artistic zealot willing to trample over anyone and everyone in order to get the perfect shot.

Miller and Lord’s ouster, however, demonstrates the limitations of a director’s power in a rapidly changing movie landscape. It’s a caste structure in which brands, be they costumed heroes or robots, are the true stars in Hollywood. As Lord and Miller discovered, no filmmaker is more important than the Jedi mythology that lies at the heart of the “Star Wars” universe. With billions of dollars in box office and merchandising at stake, studios aren’t as receptive to a director who wants to take an iconoclastic approach to the material.

Related

12 Directors Who Were Pushed from the Director’s Chair

As studios have grown more corporate and more dependent on a few major franchises, productions have become more bureaucratic. It’s Kennedy and her team at Lucasfilm who are making most of the major decisions about where to take the “Star Wars” universe, just as executive teams at DC (Geoff Johns and Jon Berg) and Marvel (Kevin Feige) are exerting enormous control over the gestations of the various sequels and spinoffs that they churn out annually. In the old days, the first move would be to hire a director. Now, a filmmaker is often brought onto a project after a script has been written and even storyboarded.

Whether it’s Lord and Miller on the Han Solo film or Rian Johnson on “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” the directors aren’t generals marshaling their film crews and casts into battle. They’re hired guns.

There’s a lot less job stability when you’re a mercenary.

Related storiesRon Howard to Take Over as Director of 'Star Wars' Han Solo SpinoffWhy Movies Need Directors Like Phil Lord and Chris Miller More Than Ever'Star Wars' Han Solo Spinoff: Lord & Miller Fired After Clashing With Kathleen Kennedy (Exclusive)
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Best Movies About the End of the World, From ‘Melancholia’ to ‘Dr. Strangelove’

The Best Movies About the End of the World, From ‘Melancholia’ to ‘Dr. Strangelove’
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: Apropos of absolutely nothing (and definitely not in response to a certain world leader taking disastrous steps towards dooming the environment of the only inhabitable planet we have), what is the best film about the end of the world?

Erin Whitney (@Cinemabite), ScreenCrush

It’s a hard tie between “Melancholia” and “Take Shelter.” One is a devastating meditation on depression, isolation and death, and the other is a dramatic masterpiece that evokes the dread and anxiety of a looming end. They’re very different films (and coincidentally opened within months of each other), but both end on final shots that left me breathless.
See full article at Indiewire »

Rats of Nimh Gets Iron Man 2 VFX Specialist as Director

Nearly two years after first being set up at MGM, the long-awaited adaptation Rats of Nimh finally has a director. James Madigan, a visual effects specialist who has worked on Iron Man 2, The Da Vinci Code and HBO's Rome, just to name a few, has come aboard to direct Rats of Nimh. This adaptation will mark the feature film directorial debut for James Madigan, after spending the past 16 years working in various areas of visual effects. He recently transitioned to second unit director, and worked on the giant shark thriller Meg.

When MGM first picked up the rights to this adaptation in March 2015, we reported that the movie will be an origin story about an "imperiled mouse protagonist" who befriends a group of lab rats as they become "hyper-intelligent." The story will follow these rats as they escape a secret laboratory and become great minds in their civilization, as
See full article at MovieWeb »

Kevin Costner Returns: How the ‘Hidden Figures’ Star Tackled a Fictitious Role in Fact-Based Crowdpleaser — Consider This

Kevin Costner Returns: How the ‘Hidden Figures’ Star Tackled a Fictitious Role in Fact-Based Crowdpleaser — Consider This
The crowd-pleasing “Hidden Figures” might be based on a true story in an unknown chapter of American history, but not every detail was drawn from real life. The film follows a trio of Nasa mathematicians and engineers during the early sixties “Space Race” era, including Taraji P. Henson as Katherine Johnson, Octavia Spencer as Dorothy Vaughn and Janelle Monae as Mary Jackson, but it also required the invention of at least one crucial character.

To create the fictional role of Space Task rroup director Al Harrison, screenwriter Allison Schroeder used three different Nasa past chiefs – including two of Johnson’s own bosses – to round out the character. She gave special attention to the inclusion of personality traits from John Stack, a lauded Nasa aeronautical engineer who Schroeder billed as “kind of this perfect chauvinist feminist,” a forward thinker who was compelled by finding the best person for the job, no matter their race or gender.
See full article at Indiewire »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites