The Face on the Milk Carton (1995) - News Poster

(1995 TV Movie)

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'Finding Carter' is, improbably, a subtle show about kidnapping

'Finding Carter' is, improbably, a subtle show about kidnapping
There’s something appealingly retro about MTV’s latest scripted offering—and not just because Finding Carter bears a striking resemblance to Caroline B. Cooney’s beloved 1990 novel The Face on the Milk Carton. (You may know it better as the inspiration for a TV movie that aired in 1995).

These days, shows for and about teenagers tend to fall into one of two categories: the Ryan Murphy-esque dramedy (high-energy, soaked with pop culture references, alternating wildly between irony and sincerity; see MTV’s own Faking It or Awkward. for examples), or the Gossip Girl-ian glitzy melodrama (think privileged
See full article at EW.com - Inside TV »

Robert Silberling, ‘Baywatch’ Producer and Father of Brad Silberling, Dies at 79

Robert Silberling, a co-executive producer and supervising executive on “Baywatch” and the father of director Brad Silberling, died Monday in Los Angeles. He was 79 and had long fought Lou Gehrig’s disease.

In addition to his work on about a dozen episodes of the hugely popular “Baywatch” around 1990, Robert Silberling was producer, supervising producer or executive producer on a number of telepics including “Outback Bound,”"Dream Breakers,” “The Gift of Love” and finally “The Face on the Milk Carton” in 1995.

Earlier Silberling had produced documentaries including “Nine From Little Rock” (1964) and “John F. Kennedy: Years of Lightning, Day of Drums” (1965) under the aegis of the U.S. Information Agency before eventually becoming an executive at ABC and then CBS.

In addition to Brad Silberling, director of “Casper,” “Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events” and “Land of the Lost,” and Brad’s wife, actress Amy Brenneman, Robert Silberling is survived by his wife,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Taylor Lautner Abducted by Another Film

Never underestimate what Twilight can do for a career: Taylor Lautner is adding yet another project to his growing list of upcoming movies. This time around, he's playing a guy who realizes that something sketchy is going on when he discovers his baby photo on a missing persons website. Sounds a whole lot like The Face on the Milk Carton, but everything old is new again in Hollywood, right? The movie is called Abduction and has already been picked up by Lionsgate after an extensive bidding war. Lautner's going to be quite the busy man: he's also got two more Twilight films to make, plus Stretch Armstrong, Cancun, not to mention a bunch of others that he's rumored to star in. I'm not surprised that studios are eager to snatch up any chance to capitalize on Twilight's huge fan base, but I'm curious about how Lautner will find the time
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Stolen Identity: Ole Bornedal’s “Just Another Love Story”

[An indieWIRE review from Reverse Shot.] If you’re about to see a movie whose title is prefixed with the generic marker “Just Another,” odds are it won’t be “just another” anything except a strenuous exercise in subverting the tropes of said genre. This titular quirk may be just a function of rough translation, but Danish filmmaker Ole Bornedal (director of “Nightwatch”—both the original and U.S. remake) lives up to his English …
See full article at Indiewire »

Review | Stolen Identity: Ole Bornedal's "Just Another Love Story"

by Jeff Reichert (January 8, 2009) [An indieWIRE review from Reverse Shot.]

If you're about to see a movie whose title is prefixed with the generic marker "Just Another," odds are it won't be "just another" anything except a strenuous exercise in subverting the tropes of said genre. This titular quirk may be just a function of rough translation, but Danish filmmaker Ole Bornedal (director of "Nightwatch" -- both the original and U.S. remake) lives up to his English title with "Just Another Love Story," a coolly modulated mistaken-identity amour fou bruised and bloodied all over by healthy run-ins with familiar noir and thriller additives.
See full article at Indiewire »

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