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‘Wallace and Gromit’ Pays Tribute to Peter Sallis, Voice of the Cheese-Loving Wallace — Watch

‘Wallace and Gromit’ Pays Tribute to Peter Sallis, Voice of the Cheese-Loving Wallace — Watch
Following the sad news that Peter Sallis has taken his last grand day out, the folks behind “Wallace and Gromit” have paid tribute to the departed actor. Sallis voiced the human half of the duo from its inception until 2010, including four short films (“A Grand Day Out,” “The Wrong Trousers,” “A Close Shave” and “A Matter of Loaf and Death”) and the feature film “Curse of the Were-Rabbit”; his gentle voice is one of the beloved stop-motion series’ most distinctive traits. Watch the video below.

Read More: Peter Sallis, Voice of Wallace in ‘Wallace and Gromit’ Series, Dead at 96

“At the time when I did it, I didn’t think this is going to make cinema history” he says as clips of the cheese-loving Wallace play. “But six years later in 1989, when the phone went and he said, ‘I finished it,’ I thought, ‘Oh, it’s only taken him six years.
See full article at Indiewire »

Peter Sallis, Voice of Wallace in Wallace and Gromit, Passes Away at 96

Peter Sallis, Voice of Wallace in Wallace and Gromit, Passes Away at 96
Peter Sallis, who is best known for voicing Wallace in the animated Wallace and Gromit movies, has passed away at the age of 96. He died on Friday at his home in the U.K. and reportedly died peacefully. Peter Sallis' acting career lasted more than 60 years, with his first role dating back to 1947. He continued acting until 2010 before retiring from the business.

With more than 150 credits to his name, Peter Sallis was very prolific during his long career, but there are two roles for which he will always be remembered. One being Wallace, a role which he first took on in 1989 in the Wallace and Gromit short A Grand Day Out. He also played Norman Clegg on Summer Wine, the longest-running British sitcom in history. Per Deadline, his agents Jonathan Altaras Associates released this statement.

"It is with sadness that we announce that our client Peter Sallis died peacefully,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Peter Sallis, Voice of Wallace in ‘Wallace & Gromit’ Films, Dies at 96

Peter Sallis, Voice of Wallace in ‘Wallace & Gromit’ Films, Dies at 96
English actor Peter Sallis, best known for voicing Wallace in the “Wallace & Gromit” films, died Friday in a London nursing home. He was 96.

“It is with sadness that we announce that our client Peter Sallis died peacefully, with his family by his side, at Denville Hall on Friday, June 2,” his agents, Jonathan Altaras Associates, said in a statement to the Guardian.

Prior to his retirement from acting in 2010, Sallis notably starred in Britain’s longest-running sitcom as Norman Clegg in “Last of the Summer Wine.” Sallis was the only actor to appear in all 295 episodes during the show’s 1973-2010 run.

He also provided the voice of Rat in the “Wind and the Willows” TV series and appeared on dozens of other TV shows including “Dr. Who.”

His vocal work in the Academy Award-winning claymation series helped him also become known outside of the United Kingdom. He portrayed the eccentric
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Peter Sallis, Voice of Wallace in ‘Wallace & Gromit’ Films, Dies at 96

Peter Sallis, Voice of Wallace in ‘Wallace & Gromit’ Films, Dies at 96
English actor Peter Sallis, best known for voicing Wallace in the “Wallace & Gromit” films, died Friday in a London nursing home. He was 96.

“It is with sadness that we announce that our client Peter Sallis died peacefully, with his family by his side, at Denville Hall on Friday, June 2,” his agents, Jonathan Altaras Associates, said in a statement to the Guardian.

Prior to his retirement from acting in 2010, Sallis notably starred in Britain’s longest-running sitcom as Norman Clegg in “Last of the Summer Wine.” Sallis was the only actor to appear in all 295 episodes during the show’s 1973-2010 run.

He also provided the voice of Rat in the “Wind and the Willows” TV series and appeared on dozens of other TV shows including “Dr. Who.”

His vocal work in the Academy Award-winning claymation series helped him also become known outside of the United Kingdom. He portrayed the eccentric cheese-loving inventor in a number of shorts
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Eddie Redmayne’s ‘Early Man’ to Be Released by Lionsgate in North America

Eddie Redmayne’s ‘Early Man’ to Be Released by Lionsgate in North America
Lionsgate has acquired U.S. rights to Aardman Studios’ upcoming prehistoric comedy adventure “Early Man,” starring Eddie Redmayne.

Directed by Nick Park from a script by Mark Burton and John O’Farrell, the stop-motion movie is co-financed by the U.K.’s Aardman and France’s Studiocanal. It’s a re-team of the companies following 2015’s “Shaun the Sheep.” Lionsgate also handled the domestic distribution for “Shaun the Sheep.”

Lionsgate CEO Jon Feltheimer made the announcement during Thursday’s earnings call with Wall Street analysts. “Early Man” opens in the U.K. on Jan. 26 and in the U.S. on Feb. 16.

The film will be released by the Lionsgate’s Summit Entertainment label. Lionsgate will also represent licensing and merchandising for the film in the U.S.

Redmayne was the first cast member who boarded the toon, set at the dawn of time when prehistoric creatures and woolly mammoths roamed the earth.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

5 Secrets Behind Aardman’s Stop-Motion Animation, from ‘Wallace & Gromit’ to ‘Early Man’

5 Secrets Behind Aardman’s Stop-Motion Animation, from ‘Wallace & Gromit’ to ‘Early Man’
Aardman co-founder Peter Lord grabbed a ball of clay before his conversation last week at the Fmx International Conference on Animation, Effects, Vr, Games and Transmedia in Stuttgart, Germany, and slowly molded a puppet of Morph, Aardman’s first creation, while discussing 40 years of stop-motion glory at its animation studio in Bristol, England.

From “Wallace & Gromit” to “Creature Comforts” to “Shaun the Sheep,” Aardman will be firmly dedicated to the hand-crafted technique of stop-motion as long as audiences continue to embrace it. For Lord, who co-founded Aardman with school chum David Sproxton before adding animator-director Nick Park to the creative team, it’s all about the comedy of manners and empathy.

Here are Lord’s five rules for stop-motion animation:

1. Never forget the importance of Ray Harryhausen.

When Lord was ten years old, he saw “Jason and the Argonauts” and was so amazed at the brilliance of stop-motion animator Ray Harryhausen
See full article at Indiewire »

Aardman's Peter Lord "Absolutely Assumes" There Will Be More 'Wallace & Gromit'

Aardman's Peter Lord
Aardman Animations co-founder Peter Lord said he “absolutely assumes” the famed U.K. stop-motion animation studio will make more projects with its famous Wallace and Gromit characters.

The characters — the subjects of Aardman stories including the Oscar-winning shorts A Close Shave and The Wrong Trousers, as well as the Oscar-winning animated feature The Curse of the Were-Rabbit — were created by the studio’s Nick Park, who is currently directing Aardman’s upcoming cavemen feature Early Man.

“When Nick’s not drawing cavemen, he’s drawing Wallace & Gromit,” Lord said during a session Thursday at VFX and animation confab Fmx in Stuttgart, Germany. “I absolutely assume...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

30 Days Until Oscar

30 is...

...the running time of Wallace & Gromit's Oscar winning shorts A Close Shave (1995) and The Wrong Trousers (1993)

...the number of features directed by Steven Spielberg from Sugarland Express (1974) to The Bfg (2016)

...the age of Bette Davis and Hilary Swank when they won their second Best Actress Oscars for Jezebel (1938) and Million Dollar Baby (2004) respectively

...the year of Best Picture winner All Quiet on the Western Front

... and the age at which you get all dressed up to be "terminated" in Logan's Run (1976). For the good of society!
See full article at FilmExperience »

Etrigan the Demon unleashed in new Justice League Dark clip

IGN has unveiled a new clip from Warner Bros.’ latest animated DC movie Justice League Dark, which sees John Constantine and Jason Blood unleashing Etrigan the Demon; check it out here…

See Also: A close shave for Bruce Wayne in latest Justice League Dark clip

When innocent civilians begin committing unthinkable crimes across Metropolis, Gotham City and beyond, Batman must call upon mystical counterparts to eradicate this demonic threat to the planet. Enter Justice League Dark, reluctantly led by the Hellblazer himself, John Constantine. Like Batman, Constantine is a cunning, often cynical loner who is the best at his chosen profession – but quickly realizes the sinister forces plaguing the planet will require help from other supernatural alliances. Forming a new “league” with sorceress Zatanna, otherworldly Deadman, and Jason Blood and his powerful alter ego Etrigan the Demon, this team of Dark Arts specialists must unravel the mystery of Earth’s
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Shaun the Sheep Movie’ Sequel in Development at Aardman Animations

‘Shaun the Sheep Movie’ Sequel in Development at Aardman Animations
Shaun the Sheep became a breakout star in Nick Park’s 1995 short film “Wallace & Gromit: A Close Shave.” The stop-motion character was then featured in “Wallace and Gromit’s Cracking Contraptions” and had his own TV series “Shaun the Sheep.”

Shaun’s big hit came in 2015 when he starred in his own feature film “Shaun the Sheep Movie.” Now, after box office success and an Oscar nomination for Best Animated Film, Aardman Animations and StudioCanal announced that a sequel is in the works.

Read More: ‘This Modern World by Tom Tomorrow’ To Be Adapted as An Animated Series

Pre-production for “Shaun the Sheep Movie 2” will begin in January 2017, with Richard Starzak back on board as director (he co-directed the first with Mark Burton) and Paul Kewley producing.

“Shaun’s move to the big screen proved such a success with audiences around the world that he and the flock are very
See full article at Indiewire »

Aardman Rounds Up The Flock For Shaun The Sheep Sequel

Bristol-based animation studio Aardman is primed to round up the flock for a sequel to last year’s sleeper hit, Shaun the Sheep.

Reteaming with Studiocanal, pre-production on the stop-motion feature will get going early next year, when Richard Starzak will return at the helm. He’ll be directing on his lonesome this time around, however, after it was confirmed that Mark Burton, who co-directed the first film, will not return. Paul Kewley is on board to produce.

Pitched as “another epic and hilarious journey, in what will be their biggest and most exciting adventure yet,” Shaun the Sheep 2 will herald the return of the title character first introduced in Nick Park’s Oscar-winning short, A Close Shave. Little is known about the sequel’s story at this time, though David Sproxton, co-founder and executive chairman of Aardman (Wallace and Gromit), stated, “the flock are very excited to be embarking
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Aardman, Studiocanal Reunite Flock For ‘Shaun The Sheep Movie 2’ – Afm

Aardman, Studiocanal Reunite Flock For ‘Shaun The Sheep Movie 2’ – Afm
Aardman and Studiocanal are reteaming for another woolly adventure with Shaun The Sheep Movie 2. The sequel to 2015’s animated comedy will be directed by Richard Starzak who collaborated on the first film, and will be produced by that movie’s Paul Kewley. Pre-production is due to begin in January. The Shaun character was first introduced via short film A Close Shave which debuted in 1995. Shaun then got his own stop-motion animated TV series that first aired on the BBC's…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

The 27 greatest stop motion movies of all time

Sean Wilson Sep 16, 2016

With Kubo & The Two Strings now playing, we salute some of our favourite stop motion animated movies...

With Laika's visually sumptuous and breathtaking stop motion masterpiece Kubo And The Two Strings dazzling audiences throughout the country, what better time to celebrate this singular and remarkable art form?

The effect is created when an on-screen character or object is carefully manipulated one frame at a time, leading to an illusion of movement during playback - and such fiendishly intricate work, which takes years of dedication, deserves to be honoured. Here are the greatest examples of stop motion movie mastery.

The Humpty Dumpty Circus (1898)

What defines the elusive appeal of stop motion? Surely a great deal of it is down to the blend of the recognisable and the uncanny: an simulation of recognisably human movement that still has a touch of the fantastical about it. These contradictions were put
See full article at Den of Geek »

At 40, Aardman Animations Stays Stubbornly Eccentric

At 40, Aardman Animations Stays Stubbornly Eccentric
In 1995, at pretty much the midpoint of Aardman Animations’ 40-year history, the Bristol-based cartoon studio’s co-founders, Peter Lord and David Sproxton, hatched the crazy idea of making a feature-length stop-motion film. It would be a send-up of the classic prison-break movie “The Great Escape.”

But starring chickens.

“It was really kind of a freak idea,” recalls Lord, who directed what became “Chicken Run,” the first of Aardman’s six features.

This was shortly before Pixar launched the CG revolution with “Toy Story,” and though Aardman was about to win its third Oscar for the Wallace and Gromit short “A Close Shave” [incidentally, the project in which it introduced hit character Shaun the Sheep], hardly anyone was making big-screen cartoon. In fact, apart from the work Henry Selick was doing for producer Tim Burton in the United States [most notably “A Nightmare Before Christmas”], the idea of an entire movie in stop-motion seemed outlandish.

“Audiences love that sense of tangibility, the sense that it isn’t perfect.” David Sproxton

But then,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

At 40, Aardman Animations Stays Stubbornly Eccentric

At 40, Aardman Animations Stays Stubbornly Eccentric
In 1995, at pretty much the midpoint of Aardman Animations’ 40-year history, the Bristol-based cartoon studio’s co-founders, Peter Lord and David Sproxton, hatched the crazy idea of making a feature-length stop-motion film. It would be a send-up of the classic prison-break movie “The Great Escape.”

But starring chickens.

“It was really kind of a freak idea,” recalls Lord, who directed what became “Chicken Run,” the first of Aardman’s six features.

This was shortly before Pixar launched the CG revolution with “Toy Story,” and though Aardman was about to win its third Oscar for the Wallace and Gromit short “A Close Shave” [incidentally, the project in which it introduced hit character Shaun the Sheep], hardly anyone was making big-screen cartoon. In fact, apart from the work Henry Selick was doing for producer Tim Burton in the United States [most notably “A Nightmare Before Christmas”], the idea of an entire movie in stop-motion seemed outlandish.

“Audiences love that sense of tangibility, the sense that it isn’t perfect.” David Sproxton

But then,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Eddie to be Heard, Not Seen

Perhaps sensing that everyone will be sick of looking at him by the tail end of 2017 (what with the multiple Oscar nominated transformations, the actual Oscar, and that new Fantastic Beasts franchise), Eddie Redmayne will give his ginger mug a wee break from gigantification on the big screen. Instead he'll be leading the voice cast of Aardman's Early Man which just went into production for release in 2018. The best part of the news is that Nick Park will be directing and he's been absent from that particular chair for too long. (His last feature was 11 long years ago, the Oscar winning Curse of the Were Rabbit.)

You can pencil it in for a Best Animated Feature nomination right now (albeit two years from now) because Aardman has quite a track record of delights (sorry Flushed Away!). They've got a heavy shelf of awards to prove it including Oscar nominations for
See full article at FilmExperience »

Shaun the Sheep: The Farmer's Llamas - get a first look ahead of the BBC special

The first picture from BBC One's Shaun the Sheep Christmas special The Farmer's Llamas has been revealed.

The image sees the loveable character meet a pack of mischievous llamas for the first time.

When the llamas, Hector, Fernando and Raul, start causing mayhem at Mossy Bottom Farm, Shaun quickly regrets tricking the farmer into buying them and decides he must take action.

The Farmer's Llamas has been created by Richard Starzak and will be directed by Jay Grace.

Shaun made his debut back in 1995 as a major character in the Wallace and Gromit short film A Close Shave.

This new Christmas special marks Shaun's first solo TV special following a Cbbc series and a big screen adventure.

Watch a trailer for Shaun the Sheep Movie, which was released earlier in 2015, below:
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Shaun the Sheep and A Walk in the Woods – Geek Girl Navigating the World

Fish out of water stories are as common as they are compelling. People relate to stories of not fitting in, but still trying to get on with their lives anyway.

At first glance, “Shaun the Sheep Movie” and “A Walk in the Woods” seem like movies that have nothing in common. One’s the latest stop-motion animated offering from Aardman, the other is a comedy starring Robert Redford and Nick Nolte. It’s an easy to make assumption that’s mostly correct.

Shaun the Sheep Movie” stars, of course, the titular character, the clever little sheep who starred in his own show for several seasons. Shaun made his film debut in the short “A Close Shave”, and has evolved into a much more intelligent character from his beginnings.

The movie starts with innocent enough intent. Shaun wants a day where he doesn’t have to deal with the same old monotonous routine,
See full article at Boomtron »

In ‘Everest,’ Dario Marianelli buries everything under the mountain

Everest

Dario Marianelli

Varèse Sarabande

Cinema has a love affair with mental illness. A shut-in with mommy issues. An insurance assessor with dissociative identity disorder. A Nobel-winning mathematician suffering from paranoid schizophrenia. And then there are those who decide to climb Mt. Everest. Certainly more daunting a lifelong pursuit than selling soap or managing a hotel, the prospect of summiting 9,000 meters above Earth’s surface attracts a rare breed of thrill-seeker, mountaineers willing to put their life or “merely” their lungs and limbs on the line against suffocating elevation and Nepalese snowstorms. In terms of mental disorders, scaling the tallest point on the planet can be filed under “psychosis.”

Baltasar Kormákur’s Everest depicts two such climbing expeditions, albeit without recognizing the crazier elements of the venture. That’s likely because many perished in the 1996 climb up Everest, including New Zealand good guy Rob Hall (Jason Clarke) and Scott Fischer
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Fear the Walking Dead Recap: There Goes the Neighborhood

Fear the Walking Dead Recap: There Goes the Neighborhood
In this week’s episode of Fear the Walking Dead, the old saying “Good fences make good neighbors” took on a whole new meaning for Maddie. But it turned out there was something scarier than even the walker next door that could drop by. What was it? Read on and find out!

RelatedFear The Walking Dead: Full-On Zombie Outbreak ‘Delayed’ Until Season 2

A Close Shave | As “The Dog” began, Travis was reassuring Ofelia that the looters wouldn’t bother breaking into her father’s barber shop. “What are they gonna steal?” he scoffed. “Combs?” Still, the group was
See full article at TVLine.com »
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