6.9/10
20,612
92 user 57 critic

Clockers (1995)

Trailer
2:18 | Trailer
Young drug pushers in the projects of Brooklyn live hard dangerous lives, trapped between their drug bosses and the detectives out to stop them.

Director:

Spike Lee

Writers:

Richard Price (book), Richard Price (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
6 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Harvey Keitel ... Rocco Klein
John Turturro ... Larry Mazilli
Delroy Lindo ... Rodney
Mekhi Phifer ... Strike
Isaiah Washington ... Victor
Keith David ... Andre the Giant
Peewee Love Peewee Love ... Tyrone (as Pee Wee Love)
Regina Taylor ... Iris Jeeter
Thomas Jefferson Byrd ... Errol Barnes (as Tom Byrd)
Sticky Fingaz ... Scientific
Fredro Starr ... Go (as Fredro)
Elvis Nolasco ... Horace (as E.O. Nolasco)
Lawrence B. Adisa ... Stan
Hassan Johnson ... Skills
Frances Foster Frances Foster ... Gloria
Edit

Storyline

Strike is a young city drug pusher under the tutelage of drug-lord Rodney Little, who, when not playing with model trains or drinking Moo for his ulcer, just likes to chill with his brothers near the benches outside the project houses. When a night man at a fast-food restaurant is found with four bullets in his body, Strike's older brother turns himself in as the killer. Det. Rocco Klein doesn't buy the story, however, and sets out to find the truth, and it seems that all the fingers point toward Strike & Rodney. Written by Michael Silva <silvamd@cleo.bc.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

When there's murder on the streets, everyone is a suspect.

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong graphic violence, strong language and drug content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The film's poster, designed by Art Sims, is an homage to the poster for Anatomy of a Murder (1959) which was designed by Saul Bass. Bass was not pleased with the poster and stated in an interview "when anyone steals something, they call it an 'homage'". See more »

Goofs

After speaking with Det. Rocco Klein outside the police station, the shadows of the buildings change size, and the position of Rodney's car is different in each of the three shots showing Ronald approaching the car and getting on. See more »

Quotes

Andre The Giant: [to Strike] You even glance in the direction of that little kid Tyrone, and I'm a fuck you up so bad you're gonna wish I had killed you.
See more »


Soundtracks

Crazy
Written by Seal
Performed by Seal
See more »

User Reviews

Lee's most mature work
27 May 1999 | by Eric-84See all my reviews

In 1995 I considered Spike Lee's gritty CLOCKERS one of the year's best films; recently I spotted its video in a clearance bin and picked it up. Upon re-viewing, I am struck again by its complexity. It is the first urban drama to depict inner-city race relations with the intricacy such a pervasive cultural issue demands. On the surface it resembles a whodunit, but its main concern is how drugs and violence contaminate entire communities, dramatized in the collapse of one African-American youth's life. (He chokes up blood the way some of us sweat.) This process is observed by a predominantly white police force that makes hollow attempts to keep order, and refuses to intervene with the community's gradual decline.

Instead of characters with overt prejudices and plain racial allegiances-characters that are sterile symbols of bigotry rather than credible humans guilty of it-Lee gives us characters of casual racism. Most representative of this is Harvey Keitel's Rocco Klein, a white detective who cannot understand the culture surrounding him, which is a culture of narcotics, violence, and black-on-black crime. On his beat, drugs are less a problem than a lifestyle, murder resolves the tiniest of disagreements, and young mothers valiantly but vainly battle the influence young dealers have on their sons. Klein views the inner-city with contempt, but deep down he knows all the whores and dealers are human beings, too.

Klein is introduced at the scene of a homicide, where the police handle the gruesome death with a clinical sense of detachment, cracking bad jokes and asking the bloodied corpse questions. Is it just a job, or is it racism? For Klein, it's both: he needs the gallows humor to psychologically deal with this culture of depravity. What's fascinating about CLOCKERS is Lee's willingness-and guts-to present Klein, despite his prejudice, as the film's hero. Lee understands that casual racism is simply endemic and inescapable in American culture. What he appreciates is Klein's ability to transcend his own prejudice and finally do the right thing.


19 of 20 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 92 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 September 1995 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Clockers See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$25,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$4,463,560, 17 September 1995

Gross USA:

$13,071,518

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$13,071,518
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | DTS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed