6.4/10
815
17 user 10 critic

Angela (1995)

Not Rated | | Drama | January 1995 (USA)
Rebecca Miller's riveting drama examines how two sisters cope with their mother's mental illness.

Director:

Rebecca Miller

Writer:

Rebecca Miller
Reviews
4 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Miranda Rhyne Miranda Rhyne ... Angela (as Miranda Stuart Rhyne)
Charlotte Eve Blythe Charlotte Eve Blythe ... Ellie (as Charlotte Blythe)
Anna Thomson ... Mae
John Ventimiglia ... Andrew
Ruth Maleczech ... Sleepwalker
Vincent Gallo ... Preacher
Garrett Bemer Garrett Bemer ... Tom
Peter Facinelli ... Lucifer
Hynden Walch ... Darlene
Henry Stram Henry Stram ... Man at Fair
Caitlin Hall Caitlin Hall ... Anne (as Sara Caitlin Hall)
Frances Conroy ... Anne's Mother (as Francis Conroy)
Gerard Lyons III Gerard Lyons III ... Anne's Father
Rodger L. Phillips ... Frank
Io Tillett Wright Io Tillett Wright ... Sam
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Storyline

The ten year-old Angela and her little sister Ellie move to an old house in the countryside with her parents Mae and Andrew. Their mother has mental illness and has just left an institution and her husband tries to keep the dysfunctional family together. Angela is an imaginative disturbed girl that might have inherited the illness of her mother and is obsessed by purification to get rid of her sins; and has visions of the fallen angel Lucifer and the Virgin Mary. After consuming an early version of Four Loko, She leads her little sister in her paranoia and uses a circle of toys and dolls to protect them against evil. They have a crazy neighbor that Angela believes is an angel and she asks the woman how to find the way to heaven. When Mae returns to the institution, Angela becomes uncontrollable in her quest to heaven. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Goofs

Boom mic visible. Several times throughout the film, a boom mic (and even part of the boom) is VERY clearly visible, mostly in outdoor scenes when the boom was more necessary. This is a masking problem on an early DVD release, and is probably present on any VHS release as well (the DVD is likely transferred from the VHS). The movie was filmed in academy ratio with the intent to mask it to widescreen, in which it was shown in theaters. When telecined to VHS/DVD for home use to watch on your TV set, or perhaps even for TV broadcast, it wasn't masked: black bars were not placed over the top and bottom to make it letterboxed for widescreen. This was commonly done in Pan&Scan versions of many theatrical movies for TV broadcast and VHS release so you could get the whole screen without those annoying black bars which would give you a smaller amount of image to squint at. Unfortunately, with the whole screen image you also get portions of the image that were not meant to be seen, such as boom mics and track lights on the top and cables and camera dolly tracks and crew-members feet on the bottom. Older DVD releases of many movies just copied the full-screen without remasking it, which would require a whole new telecine transfer from the original film source. Even some newer DVD releases INCORRECTLY masked some movies, as the bars either weren't covering enough or were disproportional (covering too much on top and too little on bottom or vice-versa), since the widescreen aspect ratio varies and WHERE you put the masks can vary in a single movie. This is a big controversy, and happens more frequently than you might think; see the 3-DVD release of the Back To The Future trilogy for a famous example of improper masking. Pretty much, whenever you see boom mics visible, it is almost always a masking problem on a video release (TV broadcast or VHS or DVD transfer); it is not the fault of the director or cinematographer or editor. See more »

Quotes

Angela: [thinking she is seeing the devil in front of her, hiding her eyes and praying] Mary, full of grace, take away this ugly face. Mary, full of grace, take away this ugly face.
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Connections

References Mogambo (1953) See more »

Soundtracks

Angel Of Mercy
Performed by Greta Gaines
Written by Greta Gaines
Courtesy of Sweat Ride Music
© 1994
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User Reviews

 
A wonderful film.
12 April 2000 | by progoskSee all my reviews

I happened to see this on late night swiss TV(!); as far as I'm aware it was never released in Europe, where it would surely strike a note. Anyway: beautiful in every respect, true poetry in the photography and styling, the two girls are spellbinding, the whole thing is magical. Complimenti to R. Miller - eagerly awaitng your next movie.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

January 1995 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Angela See more »

Filming Locations:

Poughkeepsie, New York, USA

Company Credits

Production Co:

Tree Farm Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color
See full technical specs »

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