Life with Louie (1995) - News Poster

(1995–1998)

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Supporting Actor Emmy Nominations Offer Breakthroughs for New and Longtime Roles

Supporting Actor Emmy Nominations Offer Breakthroughs for New and Longtime Roles
Every year there’s talk about the need for new blood. But this was the year Emmy voters did something about it, and there were several notable breakthroughs in the supporting race. Riding the “Game of Thrones” wave, Maisie Williams and Kit Harington scored their first noms after six seasons. Meanwhile Matt Walsh was recognized in season five, and Maura Tierney and Judith Light landed noms in their sophomore seasons. Louie Anderson and Constance Zimmer were nominated for the first time for new roles, in shows that — compared to “Game of Thrones” — had pretty low profiles.

After winning a Golden Globe in January for “The Affair,” in which she plays a woman divorcing her cheating husband, Tierney was a welcome Emmy breakthrough this year. She was last Emmy-nominated back in 2001 for “ER.” She says she’s “just thrilled to still be around,” and notes that this time, the nod feels different. “ ‘ER
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Legends and Groundbreakers Honoree Louie Anderson Reflects on His Long Comedy Career

Legends and Groundbreakers Honoree Louie Anderson Reflects on His Long Comedy Career
Louie Anderson got his start in comedy on a dare.

As a young man in Minnesota in the late 1970s, Anderson went to a comedy club with some friends. He wasn’t impressed.

“It was my fault because I said the comedians who were up there weren’t very funny,” he recalls. “That backfired on me. People said, ‘Why don’t you go up there?’ I said, ‘Ok, I will.’”

Within a week Anderson was performing on open mic night.

“I remember I wrote these jokes all week and I’d ask people if they thought they were funny,” Anderson says. “They were mostly about being a fat kid growing up. I was terrible with the mic technique, I was way too close.”

But almost instantly, Anderson, who is being honored by Variety as part of their “Legends and Groundbreakers” series at the Just for Laughs fest, started getting attention. A
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Sid Caesar, Master of TV Comedy, Dies at 91

Sid Caesar, Master of TV Comedy, Dies at 91
Sid Caesar, one of the first stars created by television via his weekly live comedy program “Your Show of Shows,” has died at 91. TV host Larry King announced the news on Twitter.

Caesar, partnered with Imogene Coca, is credited with breaking ripe comedic ground with the 90-minute live program: It didn’t rely on vaudeville or standup-inspired material but rather on long skits and sketches written by an impressive roster of comedy writers including Mel Brooks, Woody Allen, Neil Simon, Larry Gelbart, Lucille Kallen and Mel Tolkin.

Your Show of Shows” was “different from other programs of its time because its humor was aimed at truth,” Simon once observed. “Other television shows would present situations with farcical characters; we would put real-life people into identifiable situations.”

Following Caesar’s Camelot-days in the ’50s, however, he made a precipitous decline into alcoholism and barbiturates, a self-described “20 year blackout” from which Caesar
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Ask the Flying Monkey: Is Louie Anderson Gay?

Today: Is the comedian Louie Anderson gay? Plus, what do we know about Michael Stipe’s photographer-partner, Thomas Dozol – and why do the gays hate Ke$ha?

Have a question about gay male entertainment? Contact me here (and be sure and include your city and state and/or country!

Louie Anderson

Q: I was watching Louie Anderson on the Late Late Show and am curious to know if he is gay. I just read about him being blackmailed, which had me wondering. There is some conflicting information on the internet. -- Ijk

A: Back in the late 1990s, Louie Anderson was blackmailed by a man, Richard Gordon, who threatened to say that the comedian had propositioned him for sex. Anderson, who was appearing on the family-friendly shows Life With Louie and Family Feud at the time, paid the man $100,000. When Gordon subsequently came back for more money, Anderson went to the authorities,
See full article at The Backlot »

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