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Vanessa Redgrave To Receive Venice Film Festival Lifetime Achievement Award

  • Deadline
Vanessa Redgrave To Receive Venice Film Festival Lifetime Achievement Award
British actress Vanessa Redgrave will receive the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the 75th Venice International Film Festival (August 29 – September 8).

The decision was made by the Board of Directors of the Biennale di Venezia upon the recommendation of festival Director Alberto Barbera. Director David Cronenberg will receive the same award at the festival.

Born into a well-known thespian family, the acclaimed stage and screen actress is a six-time Oscar nominee, winning in 1977 for her performance in Julia. She won Venice’s Volpi Cup in 1994 for Little Odessa and can also count a Tony Award, Olivier Award, Emmy, BAFTA Award and Golden Globe among her many accolades.

Among her most recent works, in 2018 the prolific actress performed in The Aspern Papers by Julian Landais, with Jonathan Rhys Meyers and Joely Richardson; Mrs Lowry & Son by Adrian Noble, with Timothy Spall; and Georgetown by Christoph Waltz, with Annette Bening. In 2017, she
See full article at Deadline »

Venice: Vanessa Redgrave to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award

Venice: Vanessa Redgrave to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award
British actress Vanessa Redgrave will be honored by the Venice Film Festival with its Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement.

The decision was made by the festival’s parent organization, the Venice Biennale, chaired by Paolo Baratta, and upon the recommendation of festival artistic director Alberto Barbera.

Redgrave thanked the festival and noted that she was in Venice last year filming the upcoming adaptation of Henry James’ “The Aspern Papers.” She also recalled that many years ago she shot drama “La Vacanza,” directed by Tinto Brass, in the marshes of Veneto.

“My character spoke every word in the Venetian dialect,” Redgrave, 81, said in a statement. “I bet I am the only non-Italian actress to act an entire role in Venetian dialect!”

Barbera praised Redgrave for her “sensitive, infinitely faceted performances,” and noted that with her “natural elegance, innate seductive power, and extraordinary talent, she can nonchalantly pass from European art-house cinema to lavish Hollywood productions,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Venice: Vanessa Redgrave to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award

  • Variety
Venice: Vanessa Redgrave to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award
British actress Vanessa Redgrave will be honored by the Venice Film Festival with its Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement.

The decision was made by the festival’s parent organization, the Venice Biennale, chaired by Paolo Baratta, and upon the recommendation of festival artistic director Alberto Barbera.

Redgrave thanked the festival and noted that she was in Venice last year filming the upcoming adaptation of Henry James’ “The Aspern Papers.” She also recalled that many years ago she shot drama “La Vacanza,” directed by Tinto Brass, in the marshes of Veneto.

“My character spoke every word in the Venetian dialect,” Redgrave, 81, said in a statement. “I bet I am the only non-Italian actress to act an entire role in Venetian dialect!”

Barbera praised Redgrave for her “sensitive, infinitely faceted performances,” and noted that with her “natural elegance, innate seductive power, and extraordinary talent, she can nonchalantly pass from European art-house cinema to lavish Hollywood productions,
See full article at Variety »

Brad Pitt’s Sci-Fi Movie ‘Ad Astra’ to Hit Theaters in January 2019

Brad Pitt’s Sci-Fi Movie ‘Ad Astra’ to Hit Theaters in January 2019
Fox has dated Brad Pitt’s science-fiction movie “Ad Astra” for Jan. 11, 2019.

It’s the first movie to land on that date. James Gray directed “Ad Astra” from a script he co-wrote with Ethan Gross. Regency Enterprises and Fox produced in association with Bona Film Investment Company, which will distribute in China.

Tommy Lee Jones, Ruth Negga, Jamie Kennedy, and Donald Sutherland are also starring in “Ad Astra.” Pitt is playing a man who journeys across the solar system in search of his missing father, a dangerous renegade scientist. Jones has been cast as Pitt’s father.

Related

Film Review: Brad Pitt in ‘War Machine

Pitt is also producing with Plan B partners Dede Gardner and Jeremy Kleiner and Rt FeaturesRodrigo Teixeira, Keep Your Head Productions’ Anthony Katagas, and Gray. Executive producers are Mad River’s Marc Butan, Rt Features’ Lourenco Sant’Anna, Sophie Mas, Yu Dong, Jeffrey Chan, Anthony Mosawi,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tim Roth interview: Tin Star, Reservoir Dogs, Twin Peaks

Louisa Mellor Sep 8, 2017

Tim Roth leads an excellent cast in unpredictable new Sky Atlantic revenge drama Tin Star, out now…

“It’s the disposal,” says Tim Roth. “The killing isn’t the problem, it’s the disposal that’s the problem. You run out of space.” The storage issues faced by serial killers aren’t something to which many of us will have devoted much thought. Roth has. Reassuringly, he’s had reason to thanks to his recent sinister role as real-life murderer Reg Christie in BBC drama Rillington Place. “Charming fella” he jokes.

See related 26 new UK TV shows to look out for Life On Mars: revisiting a terrific UK crime drama Line Of Duty series 4: creator Jed Mercurio interview

Roth is back on UK television on the other side of the law in new Sky Atlantic drama Tin Star, which has already been renewed for a second series.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Brad Pitt and Tommy Lee Jones Team for Sci-Fi Drama Ad Astra

Brad Pitt and Tommy Lee Jones Team for Sci-Fi Drama Ad Astra
His long-gestating sequel World War Z finally back on the right track with David Fincher now confirmed to direct, Brad Pitt has also lined up another project that will shoot first. Brad Pitt has signed on to star alongside Tommy Lee Jones in a new sci-fi thriller called Ad Astra, which is Latin for "to the stars." Production is already slated to begin this coming September, with director James Grey at the helm. The filmmaker is comig off his recent film The Lost City of Z, which debuted in theaters this spring.

Deadline reports that Brad Pitt will portray Roy McBride, a "slightly autistic" space engineer, whose father disappeared 20 years ago after embarking on a one-way mission to Neptune, to find signs of intelligent life. Roy sets off on a mission of his own into outer space to find out why his father's mission failed. Tommmy Lee Jones will play the father,
See full article at MovieWeb »

The Lost City Of Z – Review

Excuse the twisting of a beloved comedian’s signature tune, but this new film’s theme could be “Hooray for Captain Fawcett, the Bolivian explorer!”. That’s Captain Percy Fawcett, to be specific. He’s the newest movie jungle adventurer, in the vein of Jungle Jim and Indiana Jones, except he was a real person. And he was the subject of a recent best-selling book. Now his exploits from nearly one hundred years ago have finally made it to the big screen. So is his quest to find The Lost City Of Z worthy of a far less treacherous trek to the local multiplex?

In 1906 Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam) was a respected member of the British Royal Artillery, especially after shooting a stag during a big hunting competition. He’s got a beautiful supportive wife Nina (Sienna Miller) and an adorable tot named Jack. Unfortunately his military career has stalled,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Why Brad Pitt Sent James Gray ‘The Lost City of Z’ And Pushed the Filmmaker In a New Direction — Podcast

Why Brad Pitt Sent James Gray ‘The Lost City of Z’ And Pushed the Filmmaker In a New Direction — Podcast
After James Gray finished reading David Grann’s book “The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon” – a nonfiction chronicle of British explorer Percy Fawcett’s obsessive quest to find a lost civilization buried deep in the Amazonian jungle – he was confused why Brad Pitt had sent it to him.

“I have absolutely no idea what they want me to do this,” said Gray when he was guest on IndieWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit podcast. “There had been nothing in my career as a director that had shown I could do anything like this.”

Paramount had bought the book for Pitt , whose production company Plan B (“Moonlight,” “12 Years a Slave”) ultimately produced the film. Pitt had always wanted to work with Gray, and while it didn’t happen this time, Pitt will star in Gray’s Sci Fi film “Ad Astra,” which is shooting this summer.
See full article at Indiewire »

'The Lost City of Z' Review: Charlie Hunnam Hunts for His Heart of Darkness

'The Lost City of Z' Review: Charlie Hunnam Hunts for His Heart of Darkness
James Gray makes films like an explorer, digging for the details that define character and art. The Lost City of Z doesn't look like Gray's other movies. Little Odessa, The Yards, We Own the Night, Two Lovers and The Immigrant mostly investigated the corners of his native New York. The Lost City of Z, set in Ireland, England and the Amazonian jungle at the start of the 20th Century, takes the Russian-Jewish Gray out of his comfort zone. His skilled screenplay, adapted from the 2009 book by David Gann, tells the story of Col.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Lost City Of Z review [Berlinale]: Dir. James Gray (2017)

The Lost City Of Z review: James Gray writes and directs this take of an epic true story of twentieth century explorer Percy Fawcett.

The Lost City Of Z review by Paul Heath at the 2017 Berlin Film Festival.

The Lost City Of Z review

James Gray follows up previous crime movies The Yards, We Own The Night and the previous Little Odessa, all of which were impressive in their own way, with this ambitious, yet involving period piece about the legendary British explorer Colonel Percy Fawcett who, in the early twentieth century, embarked on a series of journeys to find a mysterious lost city in the Amazon jungle.

Charlie Hunnam (Green Street, Sons Of Anarchy) leads the cast of this epic 140-minute motion picture that is reminiscent of movies made in an era a long ago. In The Lost City Of Z he plays the lead of Fawcett, an ambitious
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Welcome to the Jungle in New Trailer and Posters for James Gray’s ‘The Lost City of Z’

“Here was a person for whom the search meant everything,” James Gray tells National Geographic, speaking about British explorer Percy Fawcett, played by Charlie Hunnam in The Lost City of Z. “His dream of finding an ancient Amazonian civilization sustained him through unimaginable hardships, the skepticism of the scientific community, startling betrayals and years spent away from his family.” This is all captured in his latest feature, one of our early favorites of the year.

Also starring Robert Pattinson, Tom Holland, and Sienna Miller, ahead of an April release, Bleecker Street and Amazon Studios have now unveiled a new U.S. trailer for the film (which was recently cut down to a PG-13 rating, albeit in a minor fashion). For those who missed the 35mm premiere at last year’s New York Film Festival, thankfully Metrograph has unveiled they’ll be showing the film in the format this April, along with a full Gray retrospective.
See full article at The Film Stage »

’The Lost City of Z’ Trailer: Charlie Hunnam Chases Adventure in James Gray’s Latest

  • Indiewire
’The Lost City of Z’ Trailer: Charlie Hunnam Chases Adventure in James Gray’s Latest
In 2013, James Gray’s film “The Immigrant” premiered at the Cannes Film Festival and was then unceremoniously dumped in theaters by The Weinstein Company a year later, albeit to mostly positive reception. Now, Gray has returned with a new film “The Lost City of Z,” about British explorer Percy Fawcett (played by Charlie Hunnam) who, in 1925, disappeared with his son in the Amazon while looking for an ancient lost city. Based on David Grann’s 2009 book by the same name, Gray describes the film as David Lean, but with a “slightly more hallucinogenic feel. Because [the protagonist] went to the jungle and sorta went mad.” Watch a trailer for the film below.

Read More: ‘The Lost City Of Z’ Is A Beautifully Old-Fashioned Adventure — Nyff Review

The film premiered as the closing night film at the New York Film Festival in October. It co-stars Robert Pattinson (“Cosmopolis”), Sienna Miller (“Mississippi Grind”) and
See full article at Indiewire »

Austere ‘Chronic’ Provides A Showcase Role For Tim Roth [Review]

This is a reprint of our review from the 2015 Cannes Film Festival.

In the 1980s and 1990s, Tim Roth was one of the most exciting of a new generation of British actors. He worked with everyone from Robert Altman to Mike Leigh before playing Mr. Orange in Quentin Tarantino‘s breakout “Reservoir Dogs,” which brought him to the attention of an even wider audience, landing him parts in everything from major blockbusters to auteurist pictures like James Gray‘s “Little Odessa.

Continue reading Austere ‘Chronic’ Provides A Showcase Role For Tim Roth [Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘James White’ Director Josh Mond on Getting Personal, Finding the Ending, Joachim Trier, and More

In the five months found within James White, our title character is at the most difficult chapter of his life thus far. Grieving the loss of his father and attempting to assist his ailing mother, the drama authentically depicts the brutality of the process. After producing the gripping Sundance dramas Martha Marcy May Marlene and Simon Killer, Josh Mond diverts in some ways with his directorial debut. Providing yet another intimate character study of a fractured individual, James White also has a perhaps unexpected enveloping warmth.

I had the chance to speak with Mond upon the release of his debut, which arrives in limited theaters on November 13th. We discussed the personal connection everyone had on set, the intense camerawork, crafting one of the year’s most emotional scenes, finding the ending, being inspired by James Gray, Joachim Trier, Denis Villeneuve, and Wong Kar-wai, and more. Check out the full
See full article at The Film Stage »

Listen to James Gray Talk Fellini, 'The Immigrant' and His Favorite Movies

Listen to James Gray Talk Fellini, 'The Immigrant' and His Favorite Movies
James Gray has, since 1994 debut "Little Odessa," enjoyed a fruitful American indie film career despite studio pressures and tussles, including TWC's infamous dumping of "The Immigrant," his 2013 Cannes premiere that became a critics' cause celebre.  Gray, now foraying into television with a hardboiled animated series for adults, joins host Peter Labuza on the latest episode of The Cinephiliacs podcast to unpack his work, thoughts on indie filmmaking and Federico Fellini's "Nights of Cabiria" whose streetwalker with a heart of gold played by Giulietta Masina influenced Marion Cotillard's tragic heroine of "The Immigrant." Listen to the podcast here. Read More: From 'The Immigrant' to 'Two Days, One Night': Oscar Nominee Marion Cotillard's Amazing Year
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

James Gray Bites Into 'Hard Apple' With '70s-Set Animated Crime Series

Well, here's something both unexpected and a little bit surprising. While James Gray is well-versed in crime drama ("Little Odessa," "The Yards," "We Own The Night"), he's not the first name you think of when you hear the word "animation." Given his unsatisfactory experience making "The Red Road," you might think television and the small screen wouldn't be an enticing proposition. But here's the thing, this time he's going to have a lot more control, and the material sounds pretty great. Read More: James Gray Talks 'The Immigrant,' Working With Marion Cotillard, The Late Harris Savides, And Much More Variety reports that Gray will executive produce and look over all the creative decisions on "Hard Apple." The animated show is geared towards adults and based on Jerome Charyn’s books that track Isaac Sidel, a fictional a detective who walks through three decades of law enforcement starting in the 1970s.
See full article at The Playlist »

Interview: James Gray Talks 'The Immigrant,' Diving Into TV With 'Red Road,' And His Own Favorite Films

Director James Gray is something of a cinematic chameleon. While his films to date could be broadly categorized as crime dramas ("Little Odessa," "The Yards," "We Own The Night") or romances ("Two Lovers"), those descriptors are often merely the cloak that hides deeply layered and complex character studies between fathers and sons, men and women, those chasing ambition, or trying to outrun fate. And while the beautifully produced "The Immigrant," on Blu-ray this week, is on its face a period drama, it's also so much more. Starring Joaquin Phoenix, Marion Cotillard and Jeremy Renner, the film tells the story of Ewa, a Polish immigrant who crosses over to America in the early 1900s, only to discover her path to the American Dream thwarted by a charming, but deceptive, young man who forces her into prostitution. But hope lingers for Ewa, thanks to the attention of a magician who is eager to whisk her away.
See full article at The Playlist »

Ten Best: Nicolas Cage roles

Cult favourite Nicolas Cage has carved out an eclectic and brilliant career spanning the decades and across genres, with forays into action, drama and comic book adaptations to name but a few. To celebrate the release of his latest film, Dying of the Light, out on Blu-ray and DVD from the 2nd March 2015 courtesy of Signature Entertainment, we take a look back at some of his greatest roles.

Dying of the Light (2015)

This brilliant thriller, directed by Paul Schrader and executive produced by cinematic wunderkind Nicolas Winding Refn, stars Cage as Evan Lake, a desk-bound Langley CIA agent, forced into retirement by signs of early onset dementia. At the same time he discovers that his former nemesis, Jihadist Muhhamed Banir (Alexander KarimZero Dark Thirty, TV’s Tyrant), is not dead as has been assumed for the last two decades, but alive and receiving experimental medical treatment. Banir’s exact
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Team Fyc: "The Immigrant" for Original Score

Editor's Note: We're featuring individually chosen Fyc's for various longshots in the Oscar race. We'll never repeat a film or a category so we hope you enjoy the variety of picks. And if you're lucky enough to be an AMPAS, HFPA, or Critics Group voter, take note! Here's Jose on The Immmigrant.

Director James Gray has stated on many occasions that he owes his inspiration for The Immigrant to music, to be more specific: opera. How it was when he was watching Puccini’s Il Trittico at the La Opera, with tears streaming down his face, that he realized he needed to tell this story. Inspired by Puccini’s sinful sister Angelica, he created the character of Ewa (Marion Cotillard) a Polish immigrant forced into prostitution by the conniving pimp Bruno (Joaquin Phoenix) who in a way is perversely in love with her. Gray wanted to tell a grand story
See full article at FilmExperience »

6 Filmmaking Tips from James Gray

James Gray seems like an anachronism. Between visually noisy blockbusters and indies that display a greater interest in bending narrative conventions rather than mastering them, his adherence to a more classical form of storytelling feels out-of-touch with contemporary filmmaking practice. His evident influences and forerunners include Robert Bresson, Roberto Rossellini and Francis Ford Coppola, and his cinematic relationship to New York City feels indebted to Sidney Lumet yet remains unmistakably his own. Gray doesn’t use other filmmakers’ work as a Tarantino-esque palette for diversion, despite his shared affinity for crime drama, that signature ’90s indie genre staple (Gray’s first feature was a 1994 gangster film starring Tim Roth – that’d be Little Odessa, not Pulp Fiction). Gray’s narratives are classical and familiar, but they’re never derivative or postmodern. The filmmaker instead uses cinema’s history as a tool to master storytelling, character development, mood and setting as a form of practice, and
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »
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