4.6/10
176
5 user 7 critic

Dragstrip Girl (1994)

Johnny is a bad guy whom is trying to go straight whom becomes smitten with Laura, a wealthy good girl whom is rebelling against her parents by pretending to go steady with him, all set among the backdrop of 1950s Los Angeles.

Director:

Mary Lambert

Writer:

Jerome Gary
Reviews

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Mark Dacascos ... Johnny Ramirez
Natasha Gregson Wagner ... Laura Bickford
María Celedonio ... Pearl
Christopher Crabb Christopher Crabb ... Alex
Raymond Cruz ... Doogie
Frederick Coffin ... Mr. Bickford
Traci Lords ... Blanche
Richard Portnow ... Det. Dryden
Tracy Wells ... Megan
Augusto Sandino Augusto Sandino ... Anthony (as Augusto Cesar Sandino)
Adam Gifford ... Evan (as G. Adam Gifford)
Carolyn Mignini ... Mrs. Bickford
Gary Werntz Gary Werntz ... McCarthy
Luis Contreras ... Raoul
Bill A. Jones ... Mr. Jones
Edit

Storyline

Johnny is a bad guy whom is trying to go straight whom becomes smitten with Laura, a wealthy good girl whom is rebelling against her parents by pretending to go steady with him, all set among the backdrop of 1950s Los Angeles.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Fast Cars. Faster Women.

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and sexuality
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Stephen King makes a mention to this movie in his book 11/22/63. He says "I found myself watchong an old movie called Dragstrip Girl. I was watching old cars and angst-ridden teens so intently that it was giving me a headache, and I turned it off"(King 49) See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Butch Factor (2009) See more »

User Reviews

 
All 3 instances of "whom" in synopsis are incorrect.
16 February 2015 | by Darr24-7See all my reviews

Try this instead: Johnny is a bad guy trying to go straight. He's smitten with Laura, a wealthy good girl rebelling against her parents by pretending to go steady with Johnny... all set among the backdrop of 1950's Los Angeles.

i.e. neither "who" nor "whom" is needed at all.

When they are, use "who" when referring to the subject, and "whom" about the object... if you don't know which is which, ask yourself a question about the person using the verb. If the answer is "he," "she" or "they" it's a subject; use "who." If the answer is "him," "her" or "them" it's an object; use "whom."

("he" is trying to go straight, so it would be "who" if it was needed at all; "he" is smitten with Laura, so it would be "who" if it was needed at all; finally, "she" is rebelling... again, "who.")

High school English, kids... pay attention. :)

(now get off my lawn!) ;)

The film itself is none-too-memorable, even for a TV movie. :-|


2 of 2 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 5 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

2 September 1994 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Marcados Pelo Destino See more »

Filming Locations:

Los Angeles, California, USA

Company Credits

Production Co:

Showtime Networks See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed