City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold (1994) - News Poster

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Saturday Night Live Finale Review: Fred Armisen Hosts

  • Hitfix
Saturday Night Live Finale Review: Fred Armisen Hosts
This has been a fun, and weird, and uneven, and sometimes upsetting (Remember when He Who Shall Not Be Named hosted?) season, and it has been a pure joy to write about it, in both good times and bad. But as the great Nelly Furtado once sang, all good things come to an end, and so tonight we witness Season 41’s swan song-- guided by Fred Armisen, famous for his own run on SNL, his musical skill on Late Night with Seth Meyers, his IFC shows Portlandia and Documentary Now, and that time we let him play Obama because he was the most ethnic cast member SNL had. Cold Open: Hillary Clinton celebrates her inevitable victory while drinking at a bar with a slightly bitter Bernie Sanders. The two set aside their differences for a dance together. When people talk about how much better SNL was when it was first starting out,
See full article at Hitfix »

13 Comedy Movie Sequels That Don't Suck

  • Moviefone
The only movie harder to get right than the original is the sequel. Especially if that sequel is to a comedy.

A truly good sequel to a funny movie -- whether live-action or animated -- is a rare, if not endangered, species in Hollywood. For every "22 Jump Street" or "Toy Story 3," there's a "City Slickers II" (cringe) or "The Hangover: Part III" (double cringe).

"Zoolander No. 2" is the latest film that will either live or die on the altar of new installments. In honor of all the Blue Steel impressions your friends will be making this weekend, here are 13 sequels that managed to pull off the tricky feat of not sucking.
See full article at Moviefone »

Pitt Former TV Co-Star Kallsen Dead at 48, Emmy Nominee Meadows dead at 95, Oscar nominee Mankiewicz dead at 93

Brad Pitt 'Glory Days' costar Nicholas Kallsen Brad Pitt 'Glory Days' costar Nicholas Kallsen dead at 48 Nicholas Kallsen, who was featured opposite Brad Pitt in the short-lived television series Glory Days, has died at age 48 in Thailand according to online reports. Their source is one of Rupert Murdoch's rags, citing a Facebook posting by one of the actor's friends. The cause of death was purportedly – no specific source was provided – a drug overdose.* Aired on Fox in July 1990, Glory Days told the story of four high-school friends whose paths take different directions after graduation. Besides Nicholas Kallsen and Brad Pitt, the show also featured Spike Alexander and Evan Mirand. Glory Days lasted a mere six episodes – two of which directed by former Happy Days actor Anson Williams – before its cancellation. Roommates Nicholas Kallsen and Brad Pitt vying for same 'Thelma & Louise' role? The Murdoch tabloid also
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Ranked: Every Summer Movie Season Since 1980 - Part 2

  • Cinelinx
We’ve reviewed every summer movie season since 1980 to find out which are the best, and which are the worst. Last week we posted our picks for the worst, and here we post our picks for the best.

2015 and 2016 may just be the most overthetop summer movie seasons yet. It seems like nearly every movie slated for a summer 2015 or 2016 release is heavily anticipated. Because of these impending summers of movie awesomeness, we’ve decided to take a look back at summer movie seasons of years past. The idea of the summer movie season is currently in full swing, but it didn’t catch on immediately. Hollywood had to do its fair share of experimenting to determine what types of films would be most successful. As a result, some summer movie seasons have been better than others. We’ve reviewed them all for you and ranked them from worst to best.
See full article at Cinelinx »

'Speed' 20th anniversary: Screenwriter Graham Yost looks back on 'the bus movie' that became a classic

'Speed' 20th anniversary: Screenwriter Graham Yost looks back on 'the bus movie' that became a classic
Screenwriter Graham Yost, now the showrunner of FX’s Justified, admits that the plot of Speed sounds ridiculous: A bomb on a bus will detonate if the bus travels below 50 mph. But when the movie was released June 10, 1994, a funny thing happened: It became a hit with moviegoers and critics alike. To quote EW’s grade-a review: “The film takes off from formula elements – it’s yet another variation on Die Hard – but it manipulates those elements so skillfully, with such a canny mixture of delirium and restraint, that I walked out of the picture with the rare sensation that
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

A Million Ways to Die in the West review: Seth MacFarlane misfires

A Million Ways to Die in the West review: Seth MacFarlane misfires
Director: Seth MacFarlane; Screenwriters: Seth MacFarlane, Alec Sulkin, Wellesley Wild; Starring: Seth MacFarlane, Charlize Theron, Liam Neeson, Amanda Seyfried, Neil Patrick Harris; Running time: 116 mins; Certificate: 15

Imagine a bad episode of Family Guy set in the Old West and stretched out over an excruciatingly long 2-hour running time and you've pretty much landed in Seth MacFarlane's latest comedy A Million Ways to Die in the West. Blazing Saddles this is not... it's not even City Slickers II.

From the opening title credits, as the camera swoops in and around Monument Valley, it's made clear in no uncertain terms that this is A Seth MacFarlane Picture - his name looms large over the vast rock formations (as star, writer, director, producer), and that's where the problems begin for this misfiring follow-up to Ted.

MacFarlane's Albert Stark, a poor sheep farmer reeling from a breakup with girlfriend Louise (Amanda Seyfried), is
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Trailer For Age of Uprising: The Legend of Michael Kohlhaas Has Mads Mikkelsen Angry About Horse Theft

Not since City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly’s Gold has a movie title made legends seem as unattractive as the one in Age of Uprising: The Legend of Michael Kohlhaas. Yeah, Age of Uprising by itself is a pretty bad title. There have been a lot of uprisings. You can’t really pin them on any particular age. Adding on that The Legend of Michael Kohlhaas subtitle sure doesn’t make things any better, though.

But hey, whereas the legendary City Slickers sequel had the rugged-as-hell Jack Palance, Age of Uprising: The Legend of Michael Kohlhaas has the even-ruggeder looking Mads Mikkelsen. Also: I could not be more surprised that spell check did not put a red squiggly underline under the word “ruggeder,” but the English language is magical like that.

You might recognize Mikkelsen from his role as Hannibal in the TV show of the same name.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

'Deliverance' Mountain Man Bill McKinney Passes Away at Age 80

It's been a sad week of losing great talent from the likes of filmmaker Ken Russell, to comedian Patrice O'Neal, leaving us all too soon, and unfortunately we end the week losing another fantastic actor. THR reports Bill McKinney, the actor who scared the hell out of some adventurous campers and telling one in the terrified party to "squeal like a pig" in the 1972 thriller Deliverance, has passed away at 80-years old after losing a battle with cancer of the esophagus. McKinney was acting right up until his death with recent roles in How Do You Know and Pride and Glory and a Doritos commercial shot just two weeks ago. McKinney's film credits include a slew of Western themed films including The Outlaw Josey Wales and Bronco Billy with Clint Eastwood (with whom he collaborated five more times) and bit parts in City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Michael Mann Will Invest in ‘Gold’

Invest his time that is. There’s a famous quote from the cinema classic City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly’s Gold that I’ve taken into my heart and try to live by. Jack Palance, playing Curly’s twin brother Duke, remarks to Billy Crystal’s character Mitch, “Curly was wrong, there’s two things. Whatever the hell this is… and gold.” What does this have to do with anything? Almost nothing. But Michael Mann is about to push a film called Gold up to the tippy top of his films-to-be-directed list. Gold is being described by The Hollywood Reporter as a modern take on a The Treasure of the Sierra Madre type story about competing gold prospectors chasing down the precious metal. I could always go for a good sweeping adventure story, and the mentioning of The Treasure of the Sierra Madre really gets my motor revving, but
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

How Many 'Great' Comedy Sequels Can You Name? One? Two? More?

Today Universal released Get Him to the Greek, a sort-of sequel to 2008's Forgetting Sarah Marshall as it uses Aldous Snow who had a small role in the original. Beyond that, there is only a brief reference to Sarah Marshall, which has me thinking it's not really a sequel as much as it is a spin-off. The same could be said for a movie like Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back (2001)... Same characters, but not really a sequel to Clerks, which ended up having its own sequel in 2006.

In a debate with a group of fellow Seattle critics trying to decide if Get Him to the Greek was a sequel to Forgetting Sarah Marshall or not, the topic turned to comedy sequels in general and I was asked to name a great comedy sequel. Should be easy... right?

I started mining my memory banks, and started thinking of movies with
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Dead Alive: Bringing Popular Characters Back to Life in Sequels

  • IFC
Fans of the gleefully excessive Jason Statham action film "Crank" know that it concluded with an impressively ballsy ending: Statham's Chev Chelios gets his revenge but -- Spoiler Alert! -- falls out of a helicopter in the process. In "Crank"'s final shot, he falls into a car, bounces on to the pavement, twitches and... dies.

It was certainly a surprise -- a pleasant surprise, but a surprise nonetheless -- when the IFC.com staff first got word of a sequel, this week's "Crank: High Voltage." Statham was pretty clearly not alive at the end of that first movie, but, as the sequel's poster puts it: "He Was Dead... But He Got Better."

Chelios is not the first. Hollywood has a long history of bringing back popular dead characters in sequels. Here's a look at five commonly used techniques:

"He's My Twin!"

Jack Palance in "City Slickers II: The Legend
See full article at IFC »

Director Weiland Lands Odd Drama Centre Honour

  • WENN
Director Weiland Lands Odd Drama Centre Honour
A new drama centre at a Westbury, England school has been named after City Slickers II: The Legend Of Curly's Gold director Paul Weiland, even though he never attended.

Weiland insists he only received the odd honour because a former assistant's father is the headmaster of the school.

He tells WENN, "I got a house in Bath that we go to for holidays and weekends and the father of a girl who works for me there is headmaster at this Matravers School.

"He asked me if I would open a drama centre, so I went there and there was a plaque for the drama centre that had Paul Weiland on it.

"It was amazing because no one at my own old school would ever say, `Here's a pupil that's done well, maybe we should bring him back to inspire the other kids,' and these people don't know me from Adam. All the kids wanted my autograph."

Crystal Slammed By City Slickers Sequel Director

  • WENN
Crystal Slammed By City Slickers Sequel Director
Funnyman Billy Crystal's nice-guy image has taken a hammering from his City Slickers sequel director, who reveals the actor was challenging on the set.

British moviemaker Paul Weiland expected the film, City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold, to be packed with good times and laughs - but, instead, it was a terrible shoot.

And he blames his allergies and Crystal for ruining the experience.

Weiland says, "I'm always slightly anxious at first with movie stars because they can either make your life a dream or a living hell.

"Sometimes you get an actor who is majorly neurotic or powerful and controlling and it's horrible. Billy Crystal really wanted to be directing the movie.

"If you're hired as a director and someone says, 'You're not really gonna be the director; you're there to hold Billy's hand and really he's gonna direct it,' then that's fine. But, to not be told that and then to go in, it's an all-out war - and it's not pleasant."

And when he wasn't dealing with Crystal, Weiland was trying to cope with his allergies.

He adds, "I'm allergic to things like horses and cats. When I made City Slickers II, it was really dangerous because there were horses everywhere.

"I had to be drugged up to the eyeballs for that. I couldn't breathe if I got near a horse; it was horrible."

Made Of Honor

In 1986, John Hughes wrote Pretty In Pink, a high-school romantic comedy featuring a love triangle between a girl from the wrong side of the tracks, her long-smitten best friend, and a handsome rich kid. It worked so well that he essentially wrote it again with the genders reversed, and called it Some Kind Of Wonderful. Cheap? Maybe. You could simply call it consistency. But what do you call it when someone pulls a gender reversal on someone else's movie? If that movie is My Best Friend's Wedding, you call it Made Of Honor. Originality is often overrated anyway, but director Paul Weiland (City Slickers II: The Legend Of Curly's Gold, Leonard Part 6), working from a script by newcomer Adam Sztykiel and the generally reliable team of Deborah Kaplan and Harry Elfont, doesn't offer much compensation for his lack thereof. Everyone hits the notes to a tune they,...
See full article at The AV Club »

Weiland best man for Col's 'Honor'

Columbia Pictures has tapped Paul Weiland to helm the romantic comedy Made of Honor, starring Patrick Dempsey.

Penned by Deborah Kaplan and Harry Elfont from an original script by Adam Sztykiel, the story centers on a man (Dempsey) who is in love with a woman, but she's engaged to someone else. When the woman asks Dempsey's character to be her maid of honor, he agrees with the intention of winning her heart. The studio, which bought Sztykiel's spec script in April 2003, is searching for a female lead.

Neal Moritz is producing through his Sony-based Original Film shingle. Aaron Kaplan and Sean Perrone are executive producing alongside Original's Tania Landau.

Sony's Amy Baer and Adam Milano are shepherding the project for the studio.

Weiland, whose helming credits include Fine Line Features' Roseanna's Grave and City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold, most recently directed Working Title's Sixty Six, starring Helena Bonham Carter. The U.K. native also worked on several incarnations of the Mr. Bean TV series.

Oscar-Winning Actor Jack Palance Dies at 87

Oscar-Winning Actor Jack Palance Dies at 87
Jack Palance, the legendary character actor who received Oscar nominations for his villainous roles in Sudden Fear and Shane, and won an Oscar for his comedy role in City Slickers, died Friday of natural causes in California; he was 87. Notorious for playing heavies throughout his career, Palance did a 180-degree career turn at the age of 72 by playing (for laughs) the crusty, menacing trail boss Curly in the Billy Crystal comedy City Slickers. The role won him an Oscar and a place in Hollywood history books when, after accepting his Best Supporting Actor award, he dropped to the stage for a series of one-armed push-ups; the stunt became a running gag for show host Crystal that year. Born Volodymyr Palanyuk in Pennsylvania, Palance was the son of a coal miner, and embarked on a boxing career in the 1930s under the name Jack Brazzo. Enlisting in World War II, Palance suffered extensive facial damage when he was pulled from the burning wreckage of a B-24, and the resulting surgery left him with his distinctive facial features, chiseled and gaunt and, as would prove throughout his career, sometimes extremely menacing. After being discharged, Palance embarked on his acting career, starting on Broadway (where he studied Method acting and was understudy to Marlon Brando in A Streetcar Named Desire) and moving to films in 1950, making his screen debut as Walter Jack Palance in Panic in the Streets. Just two years later, he received his first Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor for Sudden Fear, in which he starred alongside Joan Crawford (as her diabolical husband) and Gloria Grahame (as his girlfriend and co-conspirator). The next year, he played the evil gunfighter Jack Wilson opposite Alan Ladd in the classic Western Shane; another Oscar nomination followed. Innumerable film and television roles followed, most often in Westerns, but he turned in yet another indelible performance in the Playhouse 90 production of Requiem for a Heavyweight (1957), which won him an Emmy Award. Palance worked non-stop through the '60s and '70s in a variety of films and TV shows (he co-hosted the show Ripley's Believe It Or Not with his daughter, Holly Palance), and began to enjoy a career renaissance of sorts in the late '80s with parts in Young Guns and Batman. After his success in City Slickers and City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold (in which he played Curly's twin brother), Palance made sporadic film and TV appearances, most recently in 2004's Back When We Were Grownups; he also painted extensively, mostly landscapes, each with a poem inscribed on the back. Palance was married to actress Virginia Baker from 1949-1966, with whom he had three children: daughters Holly and Brooke Palance, and son Cody Palance; he is also survived by his second wife, Elaine Rogers, whom he married in 1987. --Mark Englehart, IMDb staff

Oscar-Winning Actor Jack Palance Dies at 87

Oscar-Winning Actor Jack Palance Dies at 87
Jack Palance, the legendary character actor who received Oscar nominations for his villainous roles in Sudden Fear and Shane, and won an Oscar for his comedy role in City Slickers, died Friday of natural causes in California; he was 87. Notorious for playing heavies throughout his career, Palance did a 180-degree career turn at the age of 72 by playing (for laughs) the crusty, menacing trail boss Curly in the Billy Crystal comedy City Slickers. The role won him an Oscar and a place in Hollywood history books when, after accepting his Best Supporting Actor award, he dropped to the stage for a series of one-armed push-ups; the stunt became a running gag for show host Crystal that year. Born Volodymyr Palanyuk in Pennsylvania, Palance was the son of a coal miner, and embarked on a boxing career in the 1930s under the name Jack Brazzo. Enlisting in World War II, Palance suffered extensive facial damage when he was pulled from the burning wreckage of a B-24, and the resulting surgery left him with his distinctive facial features, chiseled and gaunt and, as would prove throughout his career, sometimes extremely menacing. After being discharged, Palance embarked on his acting career, starting on Broadway (where he studied Method acting and was understudy to Marlon Brando in A Streetcar Named Desire) and moving to films in 1950, making his screen debut as Walter Jack Palance in Panic in the Streets. Just two years later, he received his first Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor for Sudden Fear, in which he starred alongside Joan Crawford (as her diabolical husband) and Gloria Grahame (as his girlfriend and co-conspirator). The next year, he played the evil gunfighter Jack Wilson opposite Alan Ladd in the classic Western Shane; another Oscar nomination followed. Innumerable film and television roles followed, most often in Westerns, but he turned in yet another indelible performance in the Playhouse 90 production of Requiem for a Heavyweight (1957), which won him an Emmy Award. Palance worked non-stop through the '60s and '70s in a variety of films and TV shows (he co-hosted the show Ripley's Believe It Or Not with his daughter, Holly Palance), and began to enjoy a career renaissance of sorts in the late '80s with parts in Young Guns and Batman. After his success in City Slickers and City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold (in which he played Curly's twin brother), Palance made sporadic film and TV appearances, most recently in 2004's Back When We Were Grownups; he also painted extensively, mostly landscapes, each with a poem inscribed on the back. Palance was married to actress Virginia Baker from 1949-1966, with whom he had three children: daughters Holly and Brooke Palance, and son Cody Palance; he is also survived by his second wife, Elaine Rogers, whom he married in 1987. --Mark Englehart, IMDb staff

Oscar-Winning Actor Jack Palance Dies at 87

Oscar-Winning Actor Jack Palance Dies at 87
Jack Palance, the legendary character actor who received Oscar nominations for his villainous roles in Sudden Fear and Shane, and won an Oscar for his comedy role in City Slickers, died Friday of natural causes in California; he was 87. Notorious for playing heavies throughout his career, Palance did a 180-degree career turn at the age of 72 by playing (for laughs) the crusty, menacing trail boss Curly in the Billy Crystal comedy City Slickers. The role won him an Oscar and a place in Hollywood history books when, after accepting his Best Supporting Actor award, he dropped to the stage for a series of one-armed push-ups; the stunt became a running gag for show host Crystal that year. Born Volodymyr Palanyuk in Pennsylvania, Palance was the son of a coal miner, and embarked on a boxing career in the 1930s under the name Jack Brazzo. Enlisting in World War II, Palance suffered extensive facial damage when he was pulled from the burning wreckage of a B-24, and the resulting surgery left him with his distinctive facial features, chiseled and gaunt and, as would prove throughout his career, sometimes extremely menacing. After being discharged, Palance embarked on his acting career, starting on Broadway (where he studied Method acting and was understudy to Marlon Brando in A Streetcar Named Desire) and moving to films in 1950, making his screen debut as Walter Jack Palance in Panic in the Streets. Just two years later, he received his first Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor for Sudden Fear, in which he starred alongside Joan Crawford (as her diabolical husband) and Gloria Grahame (as his girlfriend and co-conspirator). The next year, he played the evil gunfighter Jack Wilson opposite Alan Ladd in the classic Western Shane; another Oscar nomination followed. Innumerable film and television roles followed, most often in Westerns, but he turned in yet another indelible performance in the Playhouse 90 production of Requiem for a Heavyweight (1957), which won him an Emmy Award. Palance worked non-stop through the '60s and '70s in a variety of films and TV shows (he co-hosted the show Ripley's Believe It Or Not with his daughter, Holly Palance), and began to enjoy a career renaissance of sorts in the late '80s with parts in Young Guns and Batman. After his success in City Slickers and City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold (in which he played Curly's twin brother), Palance made sporadic film and TV appearances, most recently in 2004's Back When We Were Grownups; he also painted extensively, mostly landscapes, each with a poem inscribed on the back. Palance was married to actress Virginia Baker from 1949-1966, with whom he had three children: daughters Holly and Brooke Palance, and son Cody Palance; he is also survived by his second wife, Elaine Rogers, whom he married in 1987. --Mark Englehart, IMDb staff

U.K. exec duo team to form Priority Pics

Two of the United Kingdom's most established film and television industry names -- Colin Leventhal and Marion Pilowsky -- have teamed to form Priority Pictures, the duo said Tuesday. The pair aims to develop, finance and produce projects in the $7 million-$20 million range. The company's first production, Three Bad Men, will be helmed by Paul Weiland (City Slickers 2) from a script by Paul Straughan. Billed as a black comedy, the movie details the story of three hit men on the run who decide to change their lives. Scheduled to begin shooting in the fall, the budget is set at about $25 million, Leventhal said.

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