Director Nanni Moretti takes a mordant look at Italian life through three antological vignettes presented as the chapters of an open diary.

Director:

Nanni Moretti

Writer:

Nanni Moretti
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13 wins & 20 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Nanni Moretti ... Nanni Moretti
Giovanna Bozzolo Giovanna Bozzolo ... Actor in Italian Film
Sebastiano Nardone Sebastiano Nardone ... Actor in Italian Film
Antonio Petrocelli Antonio Petrocelli ... Actor in Italian Film
Giulio Base ... Car Driver
Italo Spinelli Italo Spinelli ... On the Wall at Spinaceto
Carlo Mazzacurati ... Film Critic
Jennifer Beals ... Jennifer Beals
Alexandre Rockwell Alexandre Rockwell ... Alexandre Rockwell
Renato Carpentieri ... Gerardo
Raffaella Lebboroni Raffaella Lebboroni ... First Salina Couple
Marco Paolini Marco Paolini ... First Salina Couple
Claudia Della Seta Claudia Della Seta ... Second Salina Couple
Lorenzo Alessandri Lorenzo Alessandri ... Second Salina Couple
Antonio Neiwiller Antonio Neiwiller ... The Mayor of Stromboli
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Storyline

Nanni Moretti directs himself playing himself in this wry look at life. Presented in three chapters, Moretti uses the experiences of traveling on his motor-scooter, cruising with his friend around a set of remote islands in search of peace to finish his new film and consulting doctor after doctor to cure his annoying rash to cast a humorous look at his life and those around him. Written by James Hastie <jdh1000@cus.cam.ac.uk>

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Unrated | See all certifications »

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider. See more »

Goofs

Nanni and Gerardo are welcomed to Stromboli by the mayor of the island. Actually, Stromboli does not have any mayor, as it is part of the municipal authority of Lipari, which includes all Aeolian Islands except Salina. See more »

Quotes

Nanni Moretti: If it depends on me, I'm sure I won't make it.
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Connections

References Flashdance (1983) See more »

Soundtracks

Inevitabilmente
Written by Luigi Schiavone (as L. Schiavone) and Enrico Ruggeri (as E. Ruggeri)
Performed by Fiorella Mannoia
Ed. Musicali Merak - Il Ponte
Sony Music
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User Reviews

 
Relaxing comedy
12 March 2005 | by ataboraSee all my reviews

I had to purchase this film after seeing it once late at night on a cable channel many years ago. Although the director can come off as an effete intellectual, his focus is on the Italian culture as it has changed over the past 30 years. As a passive observer of Roman lifestyles, this film is better appreciated when you have some first hand experience living in Rome - since the director's point of view seems to come directly from this city. In a certain way, Caro Dario is the intellectual version or sequel to Fellini's Roma. Instead of satirizing low brow Roman lifestyles, Caro Dario spoofs the pretentious intellectuals (like his traveling comrade who finally breaks down and admits he is a soap opera addict) and the couples who have read various philosophical and historical works to their only son every night to help him go to sleep. As the parents are rattling off the list of philosophers and historians "... we have read Hegel, Wittgenstein, Herodotus, read and re-read Cicero", they hesitate for a moment not recalling one of the authors and the son chimes in "Tacitus!". It was funny just appreciating the stark contrast of the family's existence and lifestyle as compared to the principles and content of what they had been reading to their son.

I call it a relaxing comedy because it depends on vignettes for comedy and then intersperses great scenery and music in between. The comedic moments are just pointed enough to keep the film interesting, e.g., the very precise translation of "mezzo scemo" by Jennifer Beals; the island of misfit parents whose children reign; and the inside view of Roman medical care. Now all that's needed is a prequel to Roman culture. We have seen the Rome of the 1930s through the 1970s in Fellini's "Roma". Caro Dario takes us from the 1960s to the 1990s. Perhaps a good satire on the culture at the time Verdi through to World War I.


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Details

Country:

Italy | France

Language:

Italian | English | Mandarin

Release Date:

30 September 1994 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Dear Diary See more »

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Box Office

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$99,971
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby | Dolby SR

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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