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‘Trust’: Danny Boyle Has a Three-Season Plan For FX’s New Drama, and Donald Sutherland Will Kill to Be A Part Of It

  • Indiewire
‘Trust’: Danny Boyle Has a Three-Season Plan For FX’s New Drama, and Donald Sutherland Will Kill to Be A Part Of It
Fair warning to Christopher Plummer, or any future actor who might try to take on the role of J. Paul Getty on FX’s “Trust” — you’ll have to go through Donald Sutherland first, dead or alive.

The FX series, executive produced by Danny Boyle and Simon Beaufoy, has a three-season plan in place for tracking the story of the Getty family, one that will trip back and forth in time to document different eras. And the 82-year-old Sutherland told IndieWire that given his age, he had “warned” FX’s John Landgraf that if they wanted to ensure that he’d appear in future seasons, they should go ahead and shoot scenes with him now.

Because here’s how he feels about being recast, should the worst happen and he not be able to return: “If I’m dead and there’s a possibility to come back from Heaven — or
See full article at Indiewire »

'Harry Potter' actor Robert Hardy dies aged 91

'Harry Potter' actor Robert Hardy dies aged 91
He also starred in All Creatures Great And Small and Sense And Sensibility.

Actor Robert Hardy, best known for his roles in All Creatures Great And Small and Harry Potter, has died aged 91.

His family said Hardy had a “tremendous life” and “a giant career in theatre, television and film spanning more than 70 years”, according to the BBC.

Hardy played senior vet Siegfried Farnon in hit BBC series All Creatures Great And Small from 1978-1990.

He also found a new generation of fans when he was cast as Minister of Magic Cornelius Fudge in the Harry Potter franchise.

Hardy had roles in Little Dorrit (2008), Middlemarch (1994), Sense And Sensibility (1995) and The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965).

He played Winston Churchill several times, most famously in Winston Churchill: The Wilderness Years (1981), for which he won a Bafta, but also in Bomber Harris (1989) and War And Remembrance (1988) and an episode of Agatha Christie’s Marple (2006).
See full article at ScreenDaily »

“Middlemarch” Web Series Modernizes the Classic Novel

Middlemarch: The Series

Of all the classic novels you could imagine being turned into a web series for the 21st century, George Eliot’s “Middlemarch” might not be the first to spring to mind. Then again, where better to reinvent Eliot’s sprawling portrait of provincial life in early 19th century England — originally published in serial form across eight volumes — than on what has become the new home of installment entertainment, YouTube?

Yale Film Studies major Rebecca Shoptaw’s “Middlemarch: The Series” is an ingenious updating of Eliot’s novel which re-imagines it as a campus drama for the YouTube generation. “To me, [the novel] is something of a celebration of imperfect people living ordinary lives,” Shoptaw said when interviewed by Fandomania — and what better way to describe the appeal of the kind of to-camera vlogging style which her series riffs on? In “Middlemarch: The Series,” the provincial town of Eliot’s original work becomes the University town of Middlemarch, Connecticut — home to Lowick College, and a cast of characters at once familiar and made fresh by Shoptaw’s casting.

This is not the first web series to give a classic novel a modern update, of course, and it’s another which follows in the footsteps of the likes of Canadian series “Carmilla” in representing a broad spectrum of characters of different sexual orientations and genders. Shoptaw herself has said that the potential for reinvention she saw in the novel rested largely on her fascination with its gender dynamics. “The novel’s healthier relationships are almost entirely free of the gendered power dynamics that too often shape the relationships in classic novels,” the creator has commented. “Because of this, I was able to flip around several genders and sexualities without drastically changing the feel of the relationships.”

Middlemarch” will ultimately run for 70 episodes. You can watch episodes 1–36 on the series’s YouTube channel now. The second half of the series will be released there in August, according to the New Yorker. Watch the first episode below.

https://medium.com/media/e8f30665f5409d3a3d29a8969ce54a87/href

Middlemarch” Web Series Modernizes the Classic Novel was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Andrew Davies: my Les Misérables will be nothing like 'shoddy farrago' musical

Speaking at Hay festival, veteran writer, who adapted War & Peace for the BBC, said Victor Hugo’s novel needs a champion

Andrew Davies’s next historical novel adaptation for the BBC will be Victor Hugo’s Les Misérables – but nothing like the “shoddy farrago” of the musical.

The adapter of Pride and Prejudice, Middlemarch and most recently War & Peace gave his frank opinion of the stage and film musical to an audience at the second day of the Hay Festival.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

War and Peace … and then what?

Andrew Davies’s triumphant TV series has caused sales of Tolstoy’s epic to soar. Here are five more big reads to fill the gap – from Finnegans Wake to Gravity’s Rainbow. And every one is ripe for the small screen

Let the bells ring. War and Peace concludes in triumph. 5.7m viewers can’t be wrong. The critics agree: the man did it. He crammed Tolstoy’s massive quarts into half a dozen pint pots. Genius in a box set. Andrew Davies, reportedly, is signing up for Les Misérables. No warbling. No subtitles. If it has to be Victor Hugo I rather wish he’d gone for Toilers of the Sea, just to see how TV handled the giant squid (beats Moby-Dick any day of the week).

Davies’s breakthrough was Middlemarch, long ago in 1994. It was a book which Victorians like Trollope thought far too difficult for the
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

What Tess of the D'Urbervilles could learn from Strictly Come Dancing

I can't help thinking a bit of popular TV might have cheered up the lives of many a classic book character

How's the January self-improvement going – were you going to watch TV less, get out more? Televison's so lowbrow, we say, we hardly watch anything these days, and those reality shows are dreadful … wasn't life so much better when there was no TV and people entertained themselves?

Up to a point. Sometimes, when reading the great classics, the books that teach us about relationships and the world and love, the lives lived and the situations dealt with – well, I can't help feeling that some of them could have benefited hugely from TV. And those wonderful characters – mightn't they have improved their lot as participants in those shows we dislike so much? Or at least had more fun …

In Charlotte Brontë's Shirley there's a scene where three of the main
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

10 Pop-Culture Questions Answered by Vulture This Week

  • Vulture
10 Pop-Culture Questions Answered by Vulture This Week
Every week, Vulture faces the big, important questions in entertainment and comes to some creative conclusions. This week we parsed the Oscar nominations, collected the best moments from the Golden Globes, and revisited George Eliot's Middlemarch. You may have read some of these stories below, but you certainly didn’t read them all. We forgive you.Q: What's the big news from the Oscars?A: While there weren't any Ben Affleck–size shockers this season, there were still a number of pleasant surprises, such as Sally Hawkins's Best Supporting Actress nod for her work in Blue Jasmine. For movie critic David Edelstein, the nominations confirmed that this was "one of the most remarkable years ever for lead male performances." To get yourself up to speed, you can listen to the nominees for Best Original Song and stream the nominees for Best Documentary Feature. The full list of Oscar nominees is here.
See full article at Vulture »

Hadley Freeman's 10 awesome women: from Katharine Hepburn to Miss Piggy

They're funny and passionate. One of them can even rock a pastel pantsuit. Hadley Freeman hails her female heroes whose accomplishments deserve some serious respect

Betty White

These days, White is mainly known for two things: 1. Being old, and 2. Being funny about it. But there is so much more to her than geriatric self-mockery. Aside from her brilliant performances on The Golden Girls and The Mary Tyler Moore Show, White was one of the first women to take control of her own acting career by co-founding a TV production company in the 1950s. She was also nominated for the first best-actress Emmy in 1950, and her book about this period of her life, Here We Go Again: My Life in Television, is as funny as it is inspirational. Still sharp as a tack in her 10th decade, she is not only a hilarious actor but a hysterical off-the-cuff guest on American talk shows,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Rufus Sewell: almost famous

Rufus Sewell was a pin-up in the 1990s, then his career stalled. He tells us about moving to La, giving up drinking and why he can't wait to lose his looks

There was a moment in the mid-1990s when Rufus Sewell's international stardom was assured. Before his 30th birthday, he had starred in two hugely successful TV adaptations, of Middlemarch and Cold Comfort Farm, and taken a lead role in the original production of Tom Stoppard's Arcadia, alongside Felicity Kendal and Bill Nighy. He would clearly become stupidly famous. But then he… didn't.

"People talk about opportunity knocking," he says, "but the gate was always swinging in the breeze before I got to the door. I was the lead in Interview With The Vampire, until Tom Cruise decided he was interested. I was in The Wings Of The Dove with Uma Thurman, until that got cancelled. I
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Rufus Sewell: almost famous

Rufus Sewell was a pin-up in the 1990s, then his career stalled. He tells us about moving to La, giving up drinking and why he can't wait to lose his looks

There was a moment in the mid-1990s when Rufus Sewell's international stardom was assured. Before his 30th birthday, he had starred in two hugely successful TV adaptations, of Middlemarch and Cold Comfort Farm, and taken a lead role in the original production of Tom Stoppard's Arcadia, alongside Felicity Kendal and Bill Nighy. He would clearly become stupidly famous. But then he… didn't.

"People talk about opportunity knocking," he says, "but the gate was always swinging in the breeze before I got to the door. I was the lead in Interview With The Vampire, until Tom Cruise decided he was interested. I was in The Wings Of The Dove with Uma Thurman, until that got cancelled. I
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

BBC returns to Tolstoy's War and Peace

Unlike broadcaster's epic 1972 dramatisation, new adaptation by Pride and Prejudice screenwriter will be in six parts

More than 40 years after its epic 20-part dramatisation starring Anthony Hopkins, the BBC is to return to Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace in a new adaptation by Pride and Prejudice screenwriter Andrew Davies.

One of the most widely admired – and longest – works of world literature, the new version will be six parts long, rather shorter than its 1972 forerunner.

Davies, whose other TV adaptations include Middlemarch and Sense and Sensibility, as well as the big screen versions of the Bridget Jones books, said the novel's Natasha Rostova pipped Pride and Prejudice's Elizabeth Bennett as literature's most loveable heroine.

"Not just a great novel, it's a wonderful read and it'll make a wonderful serial. A thrilling, funny and heartbreaking story of love, war and family life," said Davies.

"The characters are so natural and
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

"House of Cards" Scribe Pens "War & Peace"

Legendary British TV scribe Andrew Davies has been hired to pen a six episode TV mini-series adaptation of Leo Tolstoy's classic "War and Peace" for The BBC. The project is scheduled to air on BBC One in 2015.

The story will remain based in war-torn 19th century Russia. Many of the philosophical elements are expected to be left out, with the series focusing on the human interactions, romance and family conflicts.

Davies penned the adaptation of the original UK "House of Cards" mini-series and its two sequels, along with film adaptations such as "Bridget Jones' Diary," "The Tailor of Panama," and "Brideshead Revisited".

He has worked on numerous mini-series including 1994's "Middlemarch," 1995's "Pride and Prejudice," 1998's "Vanity Fair," 1999's "Wives and Daughters," 2002's "Tipping the Velvet," 2005's "Bleak House," 2007's "Fanny Hill," 2008's "Little Dorrit," 2008's "Sense and Sensibility" and 2011's "South Riding."

Source: The Radio Times
See full article at Dark Horizons »

What's on Stephenie Meyer's ideal bookshelf? The works that made the artists

What made film-maker Judd Apatow want to be be funny? Or inspired novelist Stephenie Meyer to create a world of vampires? In My Ideal Bookshelf, more than 100 writers and other cultural figures were asked to share the literary journeys that helped them realise their ambitions and find success. Here are four

• What would your 'ideal bookshelf' be, and why?

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, novelist: 'All my characters drank ginger beer'

I grew up in a university town in Nigeria. I was an early reader and, what I read as a young child, were mostly British and American books. I was also an early writer. And when I began to write, at about the age of seven – stories in pencil with crayon illustrations, which my poor mother was obligated to read – I wrote exactly the kinds of stories I was reading.

All my characters were white and drank ginger beer, because the
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

David Nicholls: Adapting Great Expectations for the screen

David Nicholls, author of the hit novel One Day, has always loved Dickens's novel. As the film version is about to be released, he reveals how he set about his adaptation

Read a book at the right age and it will stay with you for life. For some people it's Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights, but for me it is Great Expectations. I first read it at 14 or so and, apart from some infatuations with Orwell, Fitzgerald, Salinger and Hardy, it has remained my favourite novel ever since. By some miracle, a story written in the mid-1850s had captured much of how I felt in a small provincial town at the end of the 1970s.

Yet if I saw myself in the book, it wasn't a particularly flattering portrait. It's clear why a young reader might aspire to be Elizabeth Bennet, but who would want to be Pip Pirrip?
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Bankers on screen don't make great role models | Stuart Jeffries

From Captain Mainwaring to Patrick Bateman, positive representations of the banking profession are hardly abundant

Why are there so few positive images of bankers? One reason surely is that the banker exists as a figure on to which we project things we cannot stand about ourselves – how we are mired in acquisitiveness and inflamed by the desire to put our Gucci-loafered foot on the throat of our fellow man or indeed woman. Or maybe it's just me.

Bankers have an even worse reputation than journalists in novels and films. At least us grubby hacks sometimes bring down presidents or topple venal corporations in Hollywood cinema

Bankers are rarely allowed such narrative development. Instead they are often irreversible reptiles, tempting us innocent Adam and Eves into their sick, debauched world where we will max out our credit cards. Think Michael Douglas's Gordon Gekko in Wall Street and his dreary eulogy to avarice: "Greed,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Russell Joins "Thrones," Mitchell In "Revolution"

6'5" British TV and film acting veteran Clive Russell has joined the cast of HBO's "Game of Thrones" for its soon to shoot third season says WinterIsComing.Net. Russell has scored the role of Brynden 'The Blackfish' Tully, Catelyn Stark's uncle and a skilled warrior who becomes a key player in Robb Stark's war effort.

Russell has had a long and distinguished career on the small screen with roles in the likes of "Middlemarch," "Cracker," "Roughnecks," "Neverwhere," "Spaced," "Happiness," "Waking the Dead," "Coronation St," "Merlin," "The Bill," "Jam and Jerusalem" and "Casualty". On the big screen he's appeared in "Sherlock Holmes," "The Wolfman," "The Wicker Tree," "King Arthur," "The 13th Warrior" and "The Power of One"

In other small screen casting news, "Lost" actress Elizabeth Mitchell is returning to the J.J. Abrams fold as she's joined the cast of NBC's "Revolution" reports The Live Feed.

Abrams and "Supernatural" creator Eric Kripke
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Everything We Know About 'Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter'

Abraham Lincoln: He was our sixteenth president, the Great Emancipator and, of course, he was also a peerless vampire hunter. Oh, sure, that last part might have been glossed over in your high school history book, but that's fine, because the truth will finally be revealed when "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter" hits theaters this week.

You don't need to wait four score and seven years to get answers, though, because we have everything there is to know about "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter" right now.

Release Date: June 22

Star Power: While "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter" doesn't quite have any of today's A-listers, it does have at least two of tomorrow's: Dominic Cooper, who wowed fans in "Captain America: The First Avenger" and critics in "The Devil's Double," and Mary Elizabeth Winstead, whose career arc has been meteoric since "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World." Bonus: The film also boasts droopy-eyed cult fave
See full article at NextMovie »

Rufus Sewell

Rufus Sewell vowed to give up playing bad guys and cads, then found himself out of work for months. So now he's back – in Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter – as a 5,000-year-old bloodsucker

Three years ago, Rufus Sewell gave up bad guys for good. After an early career steaming up teatimes in Middlemarch and Cold Comfort Farm, he slipped, in his 30s, into a rut of rotters – cruel toffs on horseback in films such as A Knight's Tale, The Legend of Zorro and Tristan and Isolde. At 40, he renounced them for better men. Men with names like Tom Builder (from HBO's The Pillars of the Earth) and Dr Jacob Hood (police procedural Eleventh Hour), and Zen, the cool Italian detective from the Michael Dibdin books adapted for the BBC.

Next week Sewell, now 44, can be seen as "Adam, lead vampire" in Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, a 3D film from Timur Bekmambetov,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Notes and queries: How can people tell when I'm looking at them?

Plus: More favourite last lines from novels; who could join Worzel Gummidge in the movies?

Why is it that when I am looking at someone across the street they often turn their heads to look at me?

Have you ever seen The Truman Show?

daveskin

All animals, including birds and even insects are extremely sensitive to being watched. Stare at your pet cat and it averts its gaze; to the cat this is a potential threat and you are too big for it to consider taking on. Stare at a big dog and you might just provoke it into attacking you.

We can, and often do, communicate by eye contact alone: if you look at the bone you have thrown for your dog, it can find it by following where you are looking. The subconscious part of our brain is working all the time. We see, but don't have to
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Kevin Spacey Is Richard III

Kevin Spacey Is Richard III
Kevin Spacey begins his run as the deranged titular king in "Richard III" tonight at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in New York. Directed by Sam Mendes, the play reunites the actor and director, who previously worked together on "American Beauty," a film that earned them both Academy Awards.

"Richard III" is the final production in The Bridge Project, a collaboration between Bam, The Old Vic and Neal Street theaters that launched in 2009 with Mendes' staging of "The Winter's Tale" and "The Cherry Orchard," and continued in 2010 with "As You Like It" and "The Tempest," also by Mendes.

"Richard III" completed its run at The Old Vic in 2011 and embarked on an international tour later that year, including stops in Hong Kong, Istanbul, Beijing, Sydney, Doha and San Francisco.

The play has received solid reviews abroad -- Michael Billington at the Guardian called it "a beautifully clear, coherent modern-dress production,
See full article at Huffington Post »
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