8.0/10
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55 user 3 critic

Due South 

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2:10 | Trailer
The adventures of an impossibly upright Royal Canadian Mounted Police constable and his American colleagues in the city of Chicago.

Creator:

Paul Haggis
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Popularity
1,878

Episodes

Seasons


Years



4   3   2   1  
1999   1998   1997   1996   1995   1994  
19 wins & 46 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
Paul Gross ...  Constable Benton Fraser / ... 67 episodes, 1994-1999
Beau Starr ...  Lt. Harding Welsh 66 episodes, 1994-1999
Tony Craig ...  Jack Huey / ... 66 episodes, 1994-1999
David Marciano ...  Ray Vecchio 44 episodes, 1994-1999
Catherine Bruhier ...  Elaine Besbriss 43 episodes, 1994-1997
Gordon Pinsent ...  Fraser Sr. / ... 40 episodes, 1994-1999
Camilla Scott Camilla Scott ...  Margaret Thatcher / ... 38 episodes, 1995-1999
Ramona Milano ...  Francesca Vecchio / ... 35 episodes, 1994-1999
Daniel Kash ...  Louis Gardino 31 episodes, 1994-1996
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Storyline

The third and fourth seasons of "Due South" pick up shortly after the first two left off. Fraser returns to Chicago, to find a blond has assumed Ray Vecchio's identity, and everyone just seems to accept it but him. Fraser and his new partner (real name Stanley Raymond Kowalski) soon find level ground to agree on, and work together to solve crimes on the mean streets of Chicago. Written by Kaolin

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The red uniform Constable Brendon Fraser is best known for wearing is called the Red Serge. It is the formal ceremonial dress uniform of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and in real life is only for special occasions or publicity. However, Fraser is established as a staunch traditionalist and insists on wearing it on duty, in addition to a brown jacketed version for less public duties. It has been playfully noted by fans that when Fraser is in civilian dress, he is simply a good Samaritan private citizen, when in he's in his brown uniform, he is an exceptional police officer. However, when Fraser wears in his full Red Serge uniform, fans notice that he becomes a near-invincible superhero capable of the nigh-impossible in the service of upholding the good. See more »

Goofs

Most of the city scenes are set in Chicago, IL, USA. However, if you watch the street signs you will see 'One Way' and 'Do Not Enter' signs without words on them, which are typical for Canadian cities (due to bilingualism laws worded signs would have to be in English and French). Also, speed limit signs can be seen posted in kilometers/hour instead of miles. See more »

Quotes

Ray Vecchio: Well, I'll be.
Fraser: Be what, Ray?
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Connections

Featured in WatchMojo: Top 10 Fictional Canadians (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Robert Mackensie
by Paul Gross
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User Reviews

My favorite TV series from the 90's
14 October 2000 | by shrine-2See all my reviews

The spirit of the pristine countryside out of which Paul Haggis' contemporary vision of the stalwart Mountie emerges was summoned to an unlikely place--downtown Chicago--and from it, "Due South" was born. My cynical side gave in to the sense of snow and suggestion of rarefied air, and the crisp figure of Paul Gross against them, as the character he plays--Constable Benton Fraser--greets the squalor and disorder of the big city with uncommon graciousness. Haggis must have intuited this gallantry would soon trigger the gag reflex of people like me, and mercifully introduced a comic turn, so his conception wouldn't turn insufferably "noble." Enter David Marciano as Chicago detective Ray Vecchio, and this vehicle burns rubber. You don't mind Haggis turning your disbelief on its head with Ray around. He's the lever that balances our doubts against the heroics that ensue. That is to say, if Ray doesn't mind being the butt of Haggis' jokes, why should we? And the laughs make the unwelcome moral at the end of each episode stick in a way it wouldn't with a graver approach.

I'm a sucker for themes where fathers try to redeem themselves in the eyes of their children, but if it's mawkish, I head for the remote control. There are at least two episodes like these that I can remember, both handled well. The one with the ex-con (and his partners-in-crime) soaked in gasoline contemplating suicide with a lit match in his hand, so his son can be set for life with the booty he's collected made my heart stop. The way Fraser talks him out of it had me swallowing hard. It was spellbinding.

I regret this series leaving the air. Gross and Marciano make for smashing buddy-buddy interplay--and I usually hate this kind of stuff. But Haggis turned me around, and had me feeling that good things were at stake, that with every day lay an opportunity to save it, that there was something to this zeal for justice and pursuit of love and self-respect, that when Haggis headed south, he was really aiming for Heaven. "Due South" was my favorite TV series from the 90's.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Canada | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 April 1994 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Due South See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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