8.1/10
5,552
54 user 3 critic

Due South 

Trailer
2:10 | Trailer

On Disc

at Amazon

The cases of a cynical American police detective and a upright Royal Canadian Mounted Police constable in the city of Chicago.

Creator:

Paul Haggis
Reviews
Popularity
2,062 ( 21)

Episodes

Seasons


Years



4   3   2   1  
1999   1998   1997   1996   1995   1994  
19 wins & 46 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
Paul Gross ...  Constable Benton Fraser / ... 67 episodes, 1994-1999
Beau Starr ...  Lt. Harding Welsh 66 episodes, 1994-1999
Tony Craig ...  Jack Huey / ... 66 episodes, 1994-1999
David Marciano ...  Ray Vecchio 44 episodes, 1994-1999
Catherine Bruhier ...  Elaine Besbriss 43 episodes, 1994-1997
Gordon Pinsent ...  Fraser Sr. / ... 40 episodes, 1994-1999
Camilla Scott Camilla Scott ...  Margaret Thatcher / ... 38 episodes, 1995-1999
Ramona Milano ...  Francesca Vecchio / ... 35 episodes, 1994-1999
Daniel Kash ...  Louis Gardino 31 episodes, 1994-1996
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Storyline

The third and fourth seasons of "Due South" pick up shortly after the first two left off. Fraser returns to Chicago, to find a blond has assumed Ray Vecchio's identity, and everyone just seems to accept it but him. Fraser and his new partner (real name Stanley Raymond Kowalski) soon find level ground to agree on, and work together to solve crimes on the mean streets of Chicago. Written by Kaolin

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Canada | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 April 1994 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Tandem de choc See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The license plate RCW139 appears on cars in a lot of the episodes from the seasons. See more »

Goofs

Fraser's left hand is stepped on in "Easy Money" yet Quinn tends to the right hand. See more »

Quotes

Fraser: I'll just be a minute.
Ray Vecchio: All right, I'm counting down. 1... 2... 3... 4...
Fraser: Technically, that's counting up.
Ray Vecchio: Get the hell outta here! 9... 10...
See more »

Connections

Referenced in EZ Streets: A Terrible Beauty (1997) See more »

Soundtracks

Robert Mackensie
by Paul Gross
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

Watch it to believe the good in humankind
12 January 2000 | by gueserSee all my reviews

I have long since packed away the Due South videotapes I own and stashed them in an unobtrusive corner, but that didn't stop me from checking out the IMDb entry and the fans' comments while surfing through here. I want to put in my two cents worth because I loved that show and I hope that one or two other persons who read this will seek it out and come to enjoy it too. Other fans have written great things about the overall quality and the subtle humor of the series - two of the best reasons to watch, so I shall stick to how I feel about the show.

Due South is a courageous show. Week after week, the writers put the comically unflappable Mountie Fraser in center court, fighting crime in his bright red ceremonial uniform. This raised eyebrows and started snickers. It was ridiculed for its ostentatiously feel-good storylines and ignored as "another one of those cop buddy series". But those who overcame their initial cynicism and stayed to watch a full hour of the show discovered a gem. The message of the show was - don't be afraid to show what's in your heart and mind. Due South the series, by being on air and gaining a loyal following, led by example.

Due South promotes old fashioned virtues. Mountie Fraser opens doors and helps old ladies cross streets. He always goes the extra mile for everyone he knows. Detractors claimed that the character was cartoonish. But again, they missed the point. I am reminded of a forwarded e-mail that encouraged the reader to wear bright colored clothes to improve the mood, spike the energy level and increase productivity in general. Another e-mail said to smile frequently so that one will feel better about oneself and be attractive to others at the same time. Due South embodies the spirit of those quaint but universally sound advice. You bring out the best in others by exhibiting the best in yourself. In our modern world of depressing grays and browns, Fraser's scarlet served as a flashing reminder that passion, over any issue, causes us to care about others and may yet redeem us from the selfish, individualistic blackhole that society is sleepwalking towards.

And my favorite reason, Due South is about friendship. Fraser and Ray took bullets for each other. I can recall a few other cop and soldier shows that had the lead characters do the same but more often than not, it's done to grandstand the machismo of the protagonists. Due South says what's really important is to be a hero for your loved ones, the people who actually need that from you. In real life, those who were passionate about the show became good friends, making full use of the (then) infant Internet to clamor for the revival of the show after its first season. I made friends with fantastic people who shared my love for Due South, people who understood and placed a high value on the kind of "through thick and thin" relationship that the show emphasized.

Due South resounds with the hope that we will remember to have love in our hearts and empathy in our actions. It doesn't try to shock or sensationalize. Instead, it requires the viewer to reflect a little after the television set is switched off. It appeals to the brain as much as it does to the heart and the funny bone. It will always be one of the best shows I know.


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