Wittgenstein (1993) - News Poster

(1993)

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Here’s Your First Look At Anthony Hopkins & Florence Pugh In ‘King Lear’

BBC Two, Amazon Prime Video, Golden Globe®, BAFTA®, and Rts® Award-winning drama producer Playground and Olivier® and Tony® Award-winning producer Sonia Friedman Productions have shared a first look image from BAFTA® and Olivier® Award-winning director Richard Eyre’s adaptation of King Lear. King Lear will premiere on BBC Two this Spring.

Set in the fictional present, King Lear sees Academy® Award winner Anthony Hopkins (The Dresser, Nixon, Silence of the Lambs) as the eponymous ruler, presiding over a totalitarian military dictatorship in England. Academy® Award and BAFTA® Award winner Emma Thompson (The Children Act, The Remains of the Day, Sense and Sensibility) stars as his oldest daughter Goneril. Academy® Award nominee and BAFTA® Award winner Emily Watson (The Theory of Everything, Genius) stars as his middle daughter Regan, and BAFTA® nominee Florence Pugh (Lady Macbeth, Marcella) as Cordelia, the youngest of Lear’s children.

Academy® Award and BAFTA® Award winner Jim Broadbent (Iris,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

First look at Anthony Hopkins and Florence Pugh in King Lear

BBC Two has released a first look image of Anthony Hopkins and Florence Pugh in the upcoming TV adaptation of William Shakespeare’s King Lear.

The modern reimagining of the tragedy takes place in the fictional present, and sees Hopkins as the eponymous ruler, presiding over a totalitarian military dictatorship in England. Emma Thompson (The Children Act, The Remains of the Day, Sense and Sensibility) stars as his oldest daughter Goneril, with Emily Watson (The Theory of Everything, Genius) as his middle daughter Regan, and Florence Pugh (Lady Macbeth, Marcella) as Cordelia, the youngest of Lear’s children.

Jim Broadbent (Iris, Game of Thrones) is the Earl of Gloucester, with Andrew Scott (Sherlock, The Hollow Crown) as his loyal son Edgar and John Macmillan (Hanna, Chewing Gum) as his illegitimate son Edmund. Jim Carter (Downton Abbey, Cranford) is the Earl of Kent, with Christopher Eccleston (The Leftovers, Thor: The Dark World) as Oswald,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson to lead all-star cast of BBC Two’s King Lear

BBC Two and production company Playground have announced that Anthony Hopkins (The Dresser, Nixon, Silence of the Lambs) and Emma Thompson (The Children Act, The Remains of the Day, Sense and Sensibility) are set to lead the cast of a star-studded adaptation of William Shakespeare’s King Lear from BAFTA-winning director Richard Eyre (The Dresser, Notes on a Scandal).

Set in the fictional present, King Lear sees Anthony Hopkins as the eponymous ruler, presiding over a totalitarian military dictatorship in England. Emma Thompson stars as his oldest daughter Goneril, with Emily Watson (Theory of Everything, Genius) as his middle daughter Regan and Florence Pugh (Lady Macbeth, Marcella) as Cordelia, the youngest of Lear’s children.

Jim Broadbent (Iris, Game of Thrones) takes the role of the Earl of Gloucester, Andrew Scott (Sherlock, The Hollow Crown) as his loyal son Edgar and John Macmillan (Hanna, Chewing Gum) as his illegitimate son Edmund.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Jodorowsky launches Kickstarter for Endless Poetry

  • ScreenDaily
Jodorowsky launches Kickstarter for Endless Poetry
Feature marks first co-production between Chile, Japan and France.

Chilean filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky is launching a Kickstarter campaign for his upcoming feature Endless Poetry (Poesia Sin Fin), which marks the first ever co-production between Chile, Japan and France.

Paris-based Satori Films is joining forces with Chile’s Le Soleil Films and Japan’s Uplink Co on the Spanish-language project, a continuation of Jodorowsky’s autobiographical The Dance Of Reality, which premiered in Cannes’ Directors Fortnight in 2013.

The Kickstarter campaign will be launched on February 15, with an announcement by Jodorowsky on YouTube Live (http://www.poesiasinfin.com).

While The Dance Of Reality focused on Jodorowsky’s unhappy childhood in Tocopilla, on the edge of the Atacama Desert, Endless Poetry revolves around his life as a poet in Santiago during the 1940s.

His sons, Adan and Brontis Jodorowsky, will star in the film, which Jodorowsky plans to shoot in Chile this summer. His partner
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Ben Gibson Goes to Australia

Ben Gibson, the departing Director of the London Film School, has been appointed to a new senior role at Aftrs, the Australian Film Television & Radio School, as Director, Degree Programs. He will start work in Sydney in September.

Gibson will play a key leadership role in ensuring the successful delivery and development of a new three-year Aftrs Bachelor of Arts (Screen) degree and Aftrs Screen and Screen Business Masters degrees, which are being restructured and relaunched for 2015.

Ben is eminently qualified for this pivotal new role at Aftrs, and I’m thrilled that he could be persuaded to bring his considerable skills, experience and academic rigor to Australia. His 14 years as Director of the very successful London Film School are notable for his work in building up the school’s reputation in the UK and abroad and expanding and accrediting its prestigious postgraduate degrees. Ben has also been a very successful and original independent producer and production executive, and has previously worked in distribution and exhibition, so he comes with a deep knowledge of the international screen industry at all levels,” said Sandra Levy, CEO of the Aftrs.

Prior to joining the London Film School in 2001, Gibson worked as a film distributor and independent producer, and as Head of Production at the British Film Institute from 1988 to 1998. His production and executive production credits include Terence Davies' " The Long Day Closes," Derek Jarman's "Wittgenstein," John Maybury's "Love is the Devil," Carine Adler's "Under the Skin"and Jasmin Dizdar's "Beautiful People," as well as 20 other low budget features and many shorts by UK directors including Patrick Keiller, Gurinder Chadha, Lynne Ramsay, Richard Kwietniowski and Andrew Kotting. As a partner in distributors The Other Cinema/Metro Pictures he acquired and promoted films by Pedro Almodovar, Chris Marker, Chantal Akerman and Jean-Luc Godard as well as opening the West End’s Metro Cinema in 1986. He has also been a theater director, a repertory film programmer and a film critic and journalist. He leaves Lfs at the end of July.

Ben Gibson said: “I am thrilled to have the opportunity to contribute to Sandra Levy’s vision of Aftrs as a complete screen school -- and to get the chance to work in the Australian film industry, one I’ve hugely admired and followed -- so far from a great distance. Aftrs offers a special combination of good things: self-confidence, an extraordinary heritage, great creative ambition, exceptional resources, a wide educational scope and a central mission in a dynamic and productive screen industry. It’s rightly considered to be one of the great film schools of the world. I can’t wait to join the team and get started there.”

Gibson’s final year at Lfs has been attended by great creative success. The school won 35 festival prizes and mentions in 2013-14, including a BAFTA nomination. Ms Levy pointed out that this year’s Palme d'Or for Best Short Film at the Cannes Film Festival was won by Leidi, the Lfs graduation film of Simón Mesa Soto. Also at Cannes, amongst seven graduates featured in the 2014 selection, "The Salt of the Earth," co-directed by Lfs graduate Juliano Ribeiro Salgado with Wim Wenders, was awarded the Un Certain Regard’s Special Jury Prize.

Director Mike Leigh, Chair of Governors at the London Film School, in announcing Ben’s departure earlier this year, said: “Ben Gibson has led Lfs from strength to strength over his fourteen years of outstanding service, and we will be sad to see him go.”

Aftrs is Australia’s national screen arts and broadcasting school and has been named as one of the Top 20 film schools in the world by industry journal, The Hollywood Reporter. As an elite specialist institution, Aftrs provides excellence in education through its practice based model, and aspires to deliver a dynamic educational offering that prepares the most talented and creative students – novice, experienced, fully fledged professional specialists – to be platform agnostic, creative and resilient in an industry subject to constant changes in knowledge and technology. The new BA Screen is a 3-year program offering a strong base in the understanding of story and screen history alongside a comprehensive introduction to the skills of screen production.
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Lfs's Ben Gibson to join Aftrs

  • ScreenDaily
Outgoing director of the London Film School to join Australian Film School.

Ben Gibson, the departing director of the London Film School, has been appointed to a new senior role at Aftrs, the Australian Film Television & Radio School, as director, degree programs. He will start work in Sydney in September.

Gibson will play a key leadership role in ensuring the successful delivery and development of a new three-year Aftrs Bachelor of Arts (Screen) degree and Aftrs Screen and Screen Business Masters degrees, which are being restructured and relaunched for 2015.

Prior to joining the Lfs in 2001, Gibson worked as a film distributor and independent producer, and as head of production at the British Film Institute (BFI) from 1988 to 1998.

His production and executive production credits include Terence DaviesThe Long Day Closes, Derek Jarman’s Wittgenstein, John Maybury’s Love is the Devil, Carine Adler’s Under the Skin and Jasmin Dizdar’s Beautiful People, as well as
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Celebrating Derek Jarman 20 years after his death

To kick off year-long celebrations of the life and work of film director Derek Jarman on the 20th anniversary of his death, Neil Bartlett explains why he will be holding an all-night party-vigil in King's College London's chapel

Anniversaries are strange things. They are meant to fix time in its proper place, but sometimes they seem to do just the opposite, bending and distorting it instead. Although I know for a fact that it is now a full 20 years since Derek Jarman died, I'm still finding this particular anniversary hard to credit. Is it really possible that somebody so productive and disruptive, so loquaciously and outrageously alive, can now be that distant?

Jarman's films – and later, his activism – were crucial points of reference in my generation's struggles to endure and enjoy life. Even before I had the good fortune to meet him in person, I intuited that here was a true ally,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Gibson stands down from Lfs

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: Mike Leigh praises London Film School director Ben Gibson for “outstanding” service.

London Film School director Ben Gibson has stepped down from the post he held for 14 years.

The Lfs board is now looking to appoint a new director who will likely assume the role from next autumn.

Gibson will remain active at the school until the transition to the new director.

Gibson has been instrumental in raising the profile of the Lfs in the UK and abroad and has also overseen the school’s long-gestating transition from Covent Garden to the Barbican.

In December 2013, the school announced its first major funding towards the transfer, with a move planned for 2016, the same year the school celebrates its 60th birthday.

Gibson told ScreenDaily: “It has been an engrossing pleasure to lead this dynamic and important institution since 2000. Lfs is a wonderful place to work and learn, and the privilege of teaching and supporting talented, collaborative and clear-eyed
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Without Theatres: ‘Hannah Arendt’ presents a harrowing portrait of the power of thought

Hannah Arendt

Written by Margarethe von Trotta and Pam Katz

Directed by Margarethe von Trotta

Germany, Luxembourg, and France, 2012

Crafting a film around a large body of work surrounding a philosopher is no easy matter. It is easy to enter the realm of condescension when trying to communicate the ideas that ruled their lives, as with the depiction of Hypatia in Agora, making even the fundamentals of mathematics so mind-numbingly dull and obvious that we may start to root for the derelict students. A blunt presentation of the lessons of the Tractatus lends to our suspicion that Derek Jarman’s Wittgenstein is a floating wisp of cerebral indulgence, although the strengths of that film lie in Jarman’s masterful formalistic, abstract qualities rather than the communication of the ideas of early analytic philosophy. With Hannah Arendt, Margarethe von Trotta, previously known for her emergence in New German Cinema alongside Fassbinder
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Fall 1993

Columns Festival Roundup Scott Macaulay visits October Films Festival Roundup The Locarno Film Festival, Montreal World Film Festival of New Cinema, and Telluride Film Festival covered by Jonathan Rosenbaum, Jerry White, and Paula S. Bernstein Production Update by Mary Glucksman Legal Affairs Shelley S. Surpin defines the role of production counsel Technology An excerpt from Erik Holsinger’s MacWeek Guide to Desktop Video Imho Mikki Halpin’s true-life stories of filmmakers online Short Ends Fall 1993 Table Of Contents Features In The Company Of Saints Peter Bowen rings up Wittgenstein‘s Derek Jarman Public Access D.A. Pennebaker and Chris HegedusThe War Room
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Filmmaker Flashback: Fall, 1993

Leading up to our 18th birthday, I’ll be revisiting on the blog one issue of Filmmaker a day. Today’s is Fall, 1993. Peter Bowen interviewed Derek Jarman about his Wittgenstein for our Fall, 1993 cover. Holly Willis interviewed D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus about their doc on the Clinton Presidential campaign, The War Room. And there is still some useful advice in this article by Daniel Einfeld, a producer of the indie hit My LIfe’s in Turnaround, on bartering and production placement. (In the Filmmaker office, this article is kind of infamous for having what is perhaps our worst article design ever, with floating clip-art dollar signs all over the page.) I interviewed Victor Nunez about his Ruby in Paradise, which...
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Derek Jarman, "Heavy Metal in Baghdad"

  • IFC
By Michael Atkinson

To each fiery cinema individualist his own honorial DVD box set: here we have a reacquaintance . or initiation, for the babies of the Reagan/Thatcher era . with the unique howl of Derek Jarman, dead in 1994 from AIDS at the age of 52, a career attenuated by the very same fate that ended up giving it such amperage. You'd never know it, but there was a time when British filmmakers, emboldened by punk culture, fueled by hatred for Thatcherite conservatism, and funded by the BFI and the new Channel Four, made outrageous, experimental, high culture vs. low culture collision movies, doped on structuralism and gender-bending and period-picture mockery. Jarman was the moment's jester prince; he never made a film you'd mistake for the work of another, or a film that doesn't manifest on the screen as an unpredictably impish riff on serious matters, Art-making and Sex and Death. Not to mention,
See full article at IFC »

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