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Three Colors: Blue (1993)

Trois couleurs: Bleu (original title)
Trailer
1:48 | Trailer
A woman struggles to find a way to live her life after the death of her husband and child.

Writers:

Krzysztof Kieslowski (scenario), Krzysztof Piesiewicz (scenario) | 3 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
4,049 ( 144)
Nominated for 3 Golden Globes. Another 21 wins & 15 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Juliette Binoche ... Julie Vignon (de Courcy)
Benoît Régent Benoît Régent ... Olivier (as Benoit Regent)
Florence Pernel ... Sandrine
Charlotte Véry ... Lucille (as Charlotte Very)
Hélène Vincent ... La journaliste (as Helene Vincent)
Philippe Volter Philippe Volter ... L'agent immobilier
Claude Duneton Claude Duneton ... Le médecin
Hugues Quester ... Patrice (Mari de Julie)
Emmanuelle Riva ... La mère
Florence Vignon Florence Vignon ... La copiste
Daniel Martin Daniel Martin ... Le voisin du dessous
Jacek Ostaszewski Jacek Ostaszewski ... Le flutiste
Catherine Therouenne Catherine Therouenne ... La voisine
Yann Trégouët Yann Trégouët ... Antoine (as Yann Tregouet)
Alain Ollivier Alain Ollivier ... L'avocat
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Storyline

The first part of Kieslowski's trilogy on France's national motto: Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity. 'Blue' is the story of Julie who loses her husband, an acclaimed composer and her young daughter in a car accident. The film's theme of liberty is manifested in Julie's attempt to start life anew, free of personal commitments, belongings, grief or love. She intends to numb herself by withdrawing from the world and living completely independently, anonymously and in solitude in the Parisian metropolis. Despite her intentions, people from her former and present life intrude with their own needs. However, the reality created by the people who need and care about her, a surprising discovery and the music around which the film revolves heal Julie and draws her back to the land of the living. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider. See more »

Goofs

When Julie spits the pills out of her mouth, she has white powder on her lips. In the next shot of her after the nurse see's her, her lips are clean, then the powder is visible again in the next shot. See more »

Quotes

Julie Vignon: Why are you crying?
La servante: Because you're not.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The final credit says in French, "We thank Alfa Romeo who allowed the scene of the accident to the Alfa 164 whose dynamics are of course purely imaginary." See more »

Connections

Followed by Three Colors: White (1994) See more »

User Reviews

 
Kieslowski: master of visual narrative.
21 November 2000 | by Nathan S. CaswellSee all my reviews

Krzysztof Kieslowski is, unquestionably, the master of the visual narrative.

More-so than even La Double Vie de Veronique (which is much more poetic than linear in it's structure), Trois Couleurs: Bleu is a marvel of visual exposition. Due to the nature of the film, exposition in this case is not necessarily related to plot, but rather to the understanding of a human being.

Kieslowski delves so deeply into the true nature of Julie (Juliette Binoche) and in such a remarkable way that by the end of the film we understand her utterly. Free from the clutter of dialogue and, for the most part, interaction with other characters we see Julie alone and in her most natural state. Kieslowski takes his documentary background and conveys his character in an almost voyeuristic manner. Showing Julie in anything but a state of solitude would be false; due to human nature Julie with Oliver would not be Julie, but rather a reflection of her true self which, although certainly interesting, pales in comparison to observing her silently struggle with the death of her husband and daughter alone.

Kieslowski played with applying the documentary techniques, which he perfected in his early work, to the narrative form in The Dekalog with tremendous, although at times visually mundane, results. The Dekalog looks like a documentary. Here, he turns over much visual control to his Director of Photographer, Slawomir Idziak, with tremendously cinematic results. Idziak's use of color and light, combined with his groundbreaking filter work, serve to further explore Julie's character. Blue feels like a documentary and looks like a dismal Rembrandt. While Kieslowski concentrates on showing the true nature of Julie through action, Idziak contributes by showing her through light and color.

Trois Couleurs: Blue is an almost unmatched achievement in the history of cinema. Never before has a character been conveyed so splendidly and in such a visually stunning manner.


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Details

Country:

France | Poland | Switzerland

Language:

French | Romanian | Polish

Release Date:

8 September 1993 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Three Colors: Blue See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,413, 5 December 1993

Gross USA:

$1,324,974

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,341,154
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby SR

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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