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Schindler's List (1993)

Trailer
2:38 | Trailer
In German-occupied Poland during World War II, industrialist Oskar Schindler gradually becomes concerned for his Jewish workforce after witnessing their persecution by the Nazis.

Director:

Steven Spielberg

Writers:

Thomas Keneally (book), Steven Zaillian (screenplay)
Popularity
276 ( 16)
Top Rated Movies #6 | Won 7 Oscars. Another 83 wins & 50 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Liam Neeson ... Oskar Schindler
Ben Kingsley ... Itzhak Stern
Ralph Fiennes ... Amon Goeth
Caroline Goodall ... Emilie Schindler
Jonathan Sagall ... Poldek Pfefferberg (as Jonathan Sagalle)
Embeth Davidtz ... Helen Hirsch
Malgorzata Gebel ... Wiktoria Klonowska (as Malgoscha Gebel)
Shmuel Levy ... Wilek Chilowicz (as Shmulik Levy)
Mark Ivanir ... Marcel Goldberg
Béatrice Macola ... Ingrid (as Beatrice Macola)
Andrzej Seweryn ... Julian Scherner
Friedrich von Thun ... Rolf Czurda (as Friedrich Von Thun)
Krzysztof Luft ... Herman Toffel
Harry Nehring Harry Nehring ... Leo John
Norbert Weisser ... Albert Hujar
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Storyline

Oskar Schindler is a vain and greedy German businessman who becomes an unlikely humanitarian amid the barbaric German Nazi reign when he feels compelled to turn his factory into a refuge for Jews. Based on the true story of Oskar Schindler who managed to save about 1100 Jews from being gassed at the Auschwitz concentration camp, it is a testament to the good in all of us. Written by Harald Mayr <marvin@bike.augusta.de>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The List Is Life. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, some sexuality and actuality violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film's tagline "Whoever saves one life saves the world entire" is a quotation from the Talmud. See more »

Goofs

Yerushalayim shel Zahav was not written until twenty years after WWII (see trivia). See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[a Hebrew prayer is chanted, followed by a flashback to 1940s Poland]
Krakow registrar: Name?
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Crazy Credits

Polish fonts were used in the credits sequence See more »

Alternate Versions

In an unprecedented move, when this film was broadcast on US television by NBC in 1997, it was, at Steven Spielberg's insistence, shown nearly uncensored (a sex scene was slightly edited) with all violence and nudity intact. It was the first program to air with the then new "TV-M" (now "TV-MA") rating. See also: Saving Private Ryan. See more »

Connections

Spoofed in Swindler's List (1994) See more »

Soundtracks

Por Una Cabeza
(uncredited)
Music by Carlos Gardel
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User Reviews

Emotional Release
31 March 1999 | by DocterrySee all my reviews

I don't know why but a couple of days ago I pulled out my copy of Schindler's List. At first I thought, well, maybe I'll watch a few minutes of it- it's so depressing but I feel like watching a good movie for a change. I hadn't seen this picture in several years since it was released. The first time I saw the film, in the theater, I went with my parents and was somewhat in denial. I tried to block out the pain that was before me and retain my composure. After realizing its brilliance, I tried to forget the film. It certainly wasn't something to dwell on.

This time when I watched the film I really surprised myself. I sat and cried like I haven't in years- but that's a good thing. I've been so divorced from my feelings and so wrapped up in my own selfish hell that I forgot what life is capable of becoming.

Now, Spielberg himself has admitted that he tends to over-sentimentalize things. Take the scene when Stern has just been rescued from the train by Schindler and as the two men walk away the camera pans to a large room where the suitcases of countless other souls less fortunate are being trifled through; a pile of personal photographs of family lay strewn amidst wasted boots and eye glasses. That scene destroyed me with emotion yet it was something that actually happened.

I will admit that towards the end, when Schindler was going on about how he could have sold his car to save more lives or sold his pin- even on second inspection, that scene seems rather forced- even enough for Jerry Seinfeld to mock. I was kind of mad at Spielberg. I mean, doesn't he know when to back off. It seems with an absolute masterpiece like this film, he would have been more careful and edited out this truly "sentimental" passage with violins going haywire.

Regardless, I'm in awe of this picture and with his latest- Saving Private Ryan, I do think that Spielberg is truly one of, if not, the greatest directors of film ever.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Hebrew | German | Polish | Latin

Release Date:

4 February 1994 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Schindler's List See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$22,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$656,636, 19 December 1993

Gross USA:

$96,898,818

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$322,161,245
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TV)

Sound Mix:

DTS | DTS-Stereo | Dolby Atmos (25th Anniversary Version)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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