In German-occupied Poland during World War II, industrialist Oskar Schindler gradually becomes concerned for his Jewish workforce after witnessing their persecution by the Nazis.

Director:

Steven Spielberg

Writers:

Thomas Keneally (book), Steven Zaillian (screenplay)
Popularity
175 ( 1)
Top Rated Movies #6 | Won 7 Oscars. Another 85 wins & 49 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Liam Neeson ... Oskar Schindler
Ben Kingsley ... Itzhak Stern
Ralph Fiennes ... Amon Goeth
Caroline Goodall ... Emilie Schindler
Jonathan Sagall ... Poldek Pfefferberg (as Jonathan Sagalle)
Embeth Davidtz ... Helen Hirsch
Malgorzata Gebel ... Wiktoria Klonowska (as Malgoscha Gebel)
Shmuel Levy ... Wilek Chilowicz (as Shmulik Levy)
Mark Ivanir ... Marcel Goldberg
Béatrice Macola ... Ingrid (as Beatrice Macola)
Andrzej Seweryn ... Julian Scherner
Friedrich von Thun ... Rolf Czurda (as Friedrich Von Thun)
Krzysztof Luft ... Herman Toffel
Harry Nehring Harry Nehring ... Leo John
Norbert Weisser ... Albert Hujar
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Storyline

Oskar Schindler is a vain and greedy German businessman who becomes an unlikely humanitarian amid the barbaric German Nazi reign when he feels compelled to turn his factory into a refuge for Jews. Based on the true story of Oskar Schindler who managed to save about 1100 Jews from being gassed at the Auschwitz concentration camp, it is a testament to the good in all of us. Written by Harald Mayr <marvin@bike.augusta.de>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Whoever saves one life, saves the world entire. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, some sexuality and actuality violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Ranked #3 on the American Film Institute's 100 Most Inspiring Movies of All Time (2006). See more »

Goofs

During the clearing of the Krakow ghetto, a SS soldier berates another soldier for shooting the boy he was dragging back to the assembly area. This soldier repeatedly mispronounces the verb "schiessen" (to shoot) with an "i" sound instead of the correct "e", making it sound like he is using the verb "scheissen" (to defecate). See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[a Hebrew prayer is chanted, followed by a flashback to 1940s Poland]
Krakow registrar: Name?
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Crazy Credits

The theatrical version juxtaposed images from the film of the actors portraying certain identified "Schindler Jews" as each actual person placed a stone on Schindler's grave. The VHS version does not use this device, showing only the actual persons, credited by name. See more »

Alternate Versions

At the end of the sequence in which the family is kicked out of their apartment and forced into the ghetto, while Oskar Schindler moves in to their former home, a stream of fellow Jews pour through the family's new apartment. In the theatrical version, they each greeted the displaced family by saying "Shalom." However, before the film came to video, it was realized that Polish Jews would not have said this Hebrew word, so the line from each Jew was re-dubbed to the Polish "Dzien Dobry." See more »

Connections

Referenced in Jeopardy!: Episode #26.9 (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

Szomorú Vasárnap
(uncredited)
Written by Rezsö Seress
Performed by Rezsö Seress
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User Reviews

 
Awesome
17 October 2005 | by ebiros2See all my reviews

The movie started out pretty innocently, and for the first 20 minutes, I was wondering where the movie was going. Then it started to happen. The horrible cruelty of concentration camps. Oskar Schindler is an example of a man that no matter what the situation, there are people who won't go along with the cruelty of society. I'm sure it took courage to do what he did, because one wrong move and you'll be dead.

Movie brought to life this great man who really shouldn't be forgotten, and thanks to Steven Spielberg, I think he'll be remembered for generations to come. Movie like this should be made once in a while. Not that movie should be used for evangelistic purposes but some story should be told well, and movie is still the best vehicle to do so.

I still think that Oskar Shindler's last words in this movie was one of the best dialog in movie history - "Why did I keep this badge ? I could have saved a person. Why did I keep this car ?, I could have saved five more people."


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Hebrew | German | Polish | Latin

Release Date:

4 February 1994 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Schindler's List See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$22,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$656,636, 19 December 1993

Gross USA:

$96,898,818

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$322,161,245
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TV)

Sound Mix:

DTS | DTS-Stereo | Dolby Atmos (25th Anniversary Version)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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