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A Love Letter to Noah Taylor

[Editor's Note: Melanie Lynskey Guest Blogging Continues!]

So, the movie Lawless came out last night. I don't know a whole lot about westerns, but I do know this movie is filled with great actors. Including, one of my absolute, all-time, favourite actors, Noah Taylor.

I remember so clearly the first time I saw Noah Taylor in a movie. I was 16, and I saw the movie Flirting, and that was it. I was in love. I loved his face, I loved the way he walked. I loved his voice and the little lisp in it. I loved the way he looked at Thandie Newton so shyly but so directly at the same time. There was such a lovely, innocent quality to him, but underneath it was something really powerful. He was sexy in a very unexpected way. There's a little edge to him and he's so funny in that movie. I went on a Noah Taylor rampage. I
See full article at FilmExperience »

Bob Ellis Pens Murdoch Telemovie

Screen Australia has provided funding development for "The News of the World", a telemovie and potential 14-part miniseries follow-up which would explore the early career and rise of media mogul Rupert Murdoch.

Political commentator, speech writer, journalist and filmmaker Bob Ellis is co-writing the script with Stephen Ramsay. The famously left-wing Ellis has worked a lot on film and television, penning such features as "Newsfront," "The Nostradamus Kid," "Goodbye Paradise" and "Fatty Finn". He also hit controversy last year for heavily criticising current Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard while simultaneously gushing praise over conservative Opposition leader Tony Abbott.

Ellis tells Mumbrella: "What we have done starts at 1960 with his early career when he bought the Daily Telegraph off Packer and then to when he bought News of the World and how he burst on the world of America and became a friend of Nixon and got a license as a foreigner media owner.
See full article at Dark Horizons »

High summit of cinema?

More than a decade after the controversial film’s release, Bob Ellis considers whether Geoffrey Wright’s Romper Stomper, starring Russell Crowe, has stood the test of time.

It was nine years before Tampa, four years before Hanson, but there it was, ugly, prophetic, violent, Romper Stomper. ‘This is not your country’. A frankly Hitlerist gang of tattooed thugs going after Asians with baseball bats, bricks and knives in Footscray alleys, defending Australia’s racial and cultural purity. ‘Won’t let what happened to the Abos happen to us,’ says Hando, the headshaven pack leader, urging his eager swarm of war-painted dysfunctionals on, despising pasta as ‘wog food’ and smashing up Japanese cars, pushing back the yellow hordes with Howardite gravitas, we will decide who comes here, and tribal pride. He may lose this war against the unceasing invader, but he will give it his best shot. Russell Crowe in
See full article at Encore Magazine »

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