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Paul Auster Novel ‘In The Country Of Last Things’ Gets Movie Adapt With Director Alejandro Chomski, Shoot Underway

  • Deadline
Paul Auster Novel ‘In The Country Of Last Things’ Gets Movie Adapt With Director Alejandro Chomski, Shoot Underway
Exclusive: Paul Auster novel In The Country Of Last Things is getting a Spanish-language movie adaptation from Argentine filmmaker Alejandro Chomski (Asleep In The Sun).

Shoot is underway at Pinewood Dominican Republic Studios on the feature starring Argentine newcomer Jazmín Diz, Mexican actor-singer Christopher Von Uckermann and Maria De Medeiros (Pulp Fiction). Funding comes from Caribbean outfit Lantica. Above is a first look at Diz in the film.

Set in a devastated city that was once a thriving metropolis, the dystopian story follows Anna (Diz) who is searching for her brother, a journalist who is missing. In her quest to find him, she meets and falls in love with Sam (Von Uckermann), another journalist. Chomski adapted Auster’s novel, which has been translated into more than forty languages.

Producers on the long-gestating project, which was originally developed as an English-language film, are Alexandra Stone of UK-based Streetcar Productions, Capa Pictures
See full article at Deadline »

The Dig review – a hole lot of buried rage

An Irish bog consumes two men seeking revenge and redemption, in Ryan and Andy Tohill’s tense thriller

Twins Ryan and Andy Tohill’s distinctive homecoming parable, further proof of Irish cinema’s resurgent boldness and versatility, finds a striking visual metaphor for the emotional labours required to find peace of mind nowadays. In the prologue’s teachable example of show-don’t-tell film-making, rough-hewn, edgy Ronan (Moe Dunford) returns to the boarded-up farmhouse he once called home with an apparent eye to starting afresh. An obstacle to the quiet life soon emerges, in the form of a crumpled older man, Sean (Lorcan Cranitch), observed digging up the adjoining peat bog. Why his quest agitates the prodigal farmhand is but gradually revealed; yet with admirable economy the Tohills and screenwriter Stuart Drennan establish a stand-off between men in small, dark holes who have sublimated all feeling into obsessive, possibly futile activity.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Charles Durning obituary

Prolific American actor who was Oscar nominated for roles in The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas and To Be Or Not to Be

The American actor Charles Durning, who has died aged 89, first grabbed audience attention as the crooked Lieutenant Snyder in The Sting (1973). He makes an explosive appearance, tearing down an alley after the slick grifter played by Robert Redford, and repeatedly lurches out of the shadows throughout the rest of the film. Durning had only a handful of scenes, and over the next 40 years would seldom be granted more screen time in 200-odd film and TV roles. Nevertheless, his jowly face, with its boxer's nose and sly eyes, grew increasingly familiar, and his name in the opening titles usually promised good things ahead. His heavyset frame meant he was often cast as tough guys, but he later assumed more jovial roles, portraying Father Christmas several times.

His first
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Terry Gilliam developing adaptation of Mr. Vertigo

Terry Gilliam revelaed that he is developing a new feature film during a Q&A at Era New Horizons Film Festival. “I got a book. It’s called ‘Mr. Vertigo’ by Paul Auster. And I’m actually working on a script of it at the moment. Doesn’t mean it will be a film; but I’m working on a script,” said Gilliam.

The book is set in the 1920s and tells the story of "an orphan who is trained to levitate by a mysterious person known only as Master Yehudi, and they travel across the United States as part of circus sideshow, showing off the wondrous feat. The orphan encounters the Americana of the era, dipping into everything from the Lindbergh’s flight, the development of the automobile, the Mob and more."

Here’s the synopsis from Amazon:

It will come as no surprise to the gifted Auster’s
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Terry Gilliam Crafting a Script Based on Paul Auster Novel ‘Mr. Vertigo’

Terry Gilliam Crafting a Script Based on Paul Auster Novel ‘Mr. Vertigo’
Novelist Paul Auster has seen his work on screen through a variety of processes: The Music of Chance adapts his novel of the same name (not very well); Smoke and Blue in the Face are the product of a collaborative writing/directing process with Wayne Wang, and Mr. Wang also filmed The Center of the World, on which Mr. Auster was a story collaborator. So: several films, but few direct novel adaptations. That could be in part due to the fact that his books aren't quite straight fiction, but rather a blend of genre tropes, existential curiosity and magical realism. Not the easiest adaptations. Those elements also make up a good part of the ingredient list for Terry Gilliam's scripts, however, and so it makes sense that he is now writing a script based on Mr. Auster's novel Mr. Vertigo. Terry Gilliam recently said at Q&A session, I got a book.
See full article at Slash Film »

And There Is Violence in My Heart: Full International and UK Trailers for The Skin I Live In

  • Pajiba
Some like their romantic comedies and others love period dramas or science fiction; I've got a long thing going with twisted tales--not quite horror--but seriously dark drama. Dead Ringers, The Comfort of Strangers, Blue Velvet, The Music of Chance are a few old favorites and I'm always in search of a new fix. This year's Venice Film Festival will premiere two entries that sound promising: Steve McQueen's Shame and Roman Polanski's Carnage, while Cannes has already seen the debut of Pedro Almodóvar's The Skin I Live In. As with most controversial films the reviews have been mixed, but more importantly, Skin had people talking ("disturbing," "operatic," "perverse,"). The muddled premise descriptions have had me curious from the outset and the short teaser left me wanting more. So no matter that we don't entirely understand the storyline (Antonio Banderas = surgeon/madman(?) seeking revenge against men who raped his
See full article at Pajiba »

Strange Highs and Strange Lows: A Layperson's (Slanted) Guide to Spader's Film Charms

  • Pajiba
James Spader clearly has a way with women. Ricky Gervais is onto that and has cleverly calculated he may be able to wrangle some new "Office" viewers by adding Spader to the mix. I've certainly never had any interest in the U.S. version of the show until now, but if my dear boy is going to be a regular, you'll find me over by the water cooler (not-so-discretely panting). What is it about this strange man, who at times seems alternately aloof and uncomfortable in his own skin? He plays seedy or slimy, quiet and shy--a complete asshole, even--and yet he can still easily grab us by the panties. Whether a rich boy, scoffing at a girl's insecurities, a bespectacled hit man or a quiet and sensitive boss, Spader has been luring us in for 30 years now. And even if he's gotten a little puffy and his hair isn't
See full article at Pajiba »

Underground Film Links: October 3, 2010

Alessandro Cima wrote a new article inspired by my old “What’s an Underground Film, Anyway?” post. In it, Cima argues that the definition of “underground film” should include “a requirement of hostility.” I like what Cima is saying and I get where he’s coming from, but I haven’t decided if I totally agree with him yet. While I certainly like a little hostility in my underground films, the problem is that sustained hostility can a) get tiring; and b) leads to burnout. But, good stuff to contemplate in the article. (P.S. Driving or walking by a row of StarWagons never gets not-exciting to me.) Donna k. muses on why more filmmakers don’t tour with their films like Brent Green does. For what it’s worth, here’s my short answer: Most filmmakers don’t create the ancillary product that would make touring profitable. Green has it all: Music,
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

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