7.7/10
23,603
270 user 22 critic

Gettysburg (1993)

PG | | Drama, History, War | 8 October 1993 (USA)
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0:31 | Trailer

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ON DISC
In 1863, the Northern and Southern forces fight at Gettysburg in the decisive battle of the American Civil War.

Director:

(as Ronald F. Maxwell)

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay) (as Ronald F. Maxwell)
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Popularity
3,101 ( 1,272)
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Lieut. Gen. James Longstreet
... Gen. Robert E. Lee
... Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett
... Brig. Gen. Lewis A. Armistead
... Brig. Gen. Richard B. Garnett
... Henry T. Harrison
... Maj. Gen. John Bell Hood
... Maj. Walter H. Taylor
... Lieut. Col. Arthur Fremantle
... Maj. Gen. Isaac R. Trimble / Narrator (as Morgan Sheppard)
... Maj. G. Moxley Sorrel
... Col. E. Porter Alexander (as Patrick Stuart)
Tim Ruddy ... Maj. Charles Marshall
... Brig. Gen. James L. Kemper
... Cap. Thomas J. Goree
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Storyline

The four and 1/4 hour depiction of the historical and personal events surrounding and including the decisive American civil war battle features thousands of civil war re-enactors marching over the exact ground that the federal army and the army of North Virginia fought on. The defense of the Little Round Top and Pickett's Charge are highlighted in the actual three day battle which is surrounded by the speeches of the commanding officers and the personal reflections of the fighting men. Based upon the novel 'The Killer Angels'. Written by Keith Loh <loh@sfu.ca>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Same Land. Same God. Different Dreams. See more »

Genres:

Drama | History | War

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for language and epic battle scenes | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

8 October 1993 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Killer Angels  »

Filming Locations:

 »

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Box Office

Budget:

$25,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$10,769,960
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(70 mm prints)| (35 mm prints)| (35 mm prints)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

George Lazenby insisted that he have a real beard instead of a fake one for his role as Brigadier General J. Johnston Pettigrew in the film. So his scene was not shot until he had grown a full beard. See more »

Goofs

During the up-close battle of Little Round Top, featuring Chamberlain and his Union 20th Maine and the Confederate Alabamians down the summit, a gray haired & bearded Confederate Sgt is seen felled by a bullet fired by Union Sgt. "Buster" Kilrain. Later in the battle, that same Confederate Sgt. is seen unhurt and charging up the hill just right before the main close quarters battle scene. See more »

Quotes

[actual quote, after Pickett's Charge fails]
General Robert E. Lee: General, you must look to your division.
Major General George E. Pickett: General Lee... I have no division.
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Soundtracks

Dixie
(uncredited)
Composed by Daniel Decatur Emmett (circa 1850s)
Played during Lee's march through Pennsylvania
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

An amazing battle picture
5 March 2002 | by See all my reviews

A film that runs longer than 'Lawrence of Arabia' and only covers three days of action sounds a long haul but it is not. As someone who is both British and interested rather than an expert on the Civil War I found 'Gettysburg' very satisfying. The prologue makes the objectives of the two armies clear and the 'updates' in the form of dialogue between the commanders mean the viewer doesn't lose sight of the course of events. The battle scenes capture the "terrible beauty" of combat, conveying terror, claustrophobia and violence without being too horrific.

More important, the film makes the most of the remarkably rich characters who took part. My only hope is that Col. Chamberlain was as intelligent, humane and courageous in life as Jeff Daniels's performance. This is just one example, and there are many men one would like to know more about as a result of seeing this.

The one question I was left with came from Martin Sheen's portrayal of Lee. I know Lee had been unwell before the battle but Martin Sheen seems strangely remote from events, with a glazed look in his eye and high-pitched 'other worldly' voice. Is this fair and accurate? At least Lee has the moral courage to say "It's all my fault" when he sees the result of Pickett's Charge. I don't remember Douglas Haig saying that after the first day on the Somme in 1916.


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