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Clean, Shaven (1993)

Not Rated | | Crime, Drama, Thriller | 21 April 1995 (USA)
After a man suffering from schizophrenia is released from a mental institution, he attempts to get his daughter back from her adoptive family.

Director:

Lodge Kerrigan (as Lodge H. Kerrigan)

Writer:

Lodge Kerrigan (as Lodge H. Kerrigan)
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5 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Peter Greene ... Peter Winter
Alice Levitt Alice Levitt ... Girl with Ball
Megan Owen Megan Owen ... Mrs. Winter
Jennifer MacDonald Jennifer MacDonald ... Nicole
Molly Castelloe Molly Castelloe ... Melinda Frayne
Jill Chamberlain ... Teenager at Motel
Agathe Leclerc Agathe Leclerc ... Murdered Girl
Robert Albert Robert Albert ... Jack McNally
Roget Joly Roget Joly ... Police Photographer
René Beaudin René Beaudin ... Boy on Bicycle
J. Dixon Byrne ... Dr. Michaels
Eliot Rockett Eliot Rockett ... Man on Ladder / Man in Jeep
Angela Vibert Angela Vibert ... Girl in Rain
Karen MacDonald ... Girl in Rain
Lee Kayman Lee Kayman ... Bartender
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Storyline

Clean shaven a tough film for some to take, but it contains by far the most honest and moving portrait of schizophrenia every put on the screen. Peter Greene portrays a young man who'd been instatutionalised. Now outside, he's desperately trying to find a way to both function in the world, and to search for his young daughter, who he had before being hospitalised, and had only seen as an infant. It's a hard film for some to watch, but it's also highly rewarding -especially in Mr Green's riveting performance. Written by Tad Dibbern <DIBBERN_D@a1.mscf.upenn.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Thriller

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

21 April 1995 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Glatt rasiert See more »

Filming Locations:

Long Island, New York, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$68,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$26,351

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$26,351
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

DSM III, Warner Bros. See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film is part of the Criterion Collection, spine #354. See more »

Goofs

The policeman picks up a cigarette butt from the end table using a pair of tweezers. In closeup the burnt end is pointing up; the wider shot immediately after, when he brings it to his nose, shows the burnt end pointing down. See more »

Quotes

Peter Winter: I was in a, in a hospital bed, and I had been operated on. And they had put a, a small receiver in the back of my head and a transmitter in my finger. You know what they are?
Nicole Winter: A radio?
Peter Winter: Yeah, a radio. Anyway, to get at the transmitter, I had to take my fingernail off.
See more »

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User Reviews

 
The Sound and the Fury
11 January 2007 | by adrian-193See all my reviews

This is a small indie by Lodge Kerrigan made in 94. Kerrigan's recent film Keane was astonishing (as was Damian Lewis). Like Keane, this film features a genuinely real and captivating performance by an actor playing a schizophrenic. The film's movement is fragmentary, roped together by a soundtrack that reveals the voices we might suppose are echoing within our character's unbound mind. His actions are confusing to him, and make us increasingly reluctant to watch, as watching makes us complicit with what he does, which is bad.

The use of sound in this film practically makes it worth watching in its own right, pun intended. In the critic's video essay that accompanies the Criterion release of this film, which is pitched to grad level film students (and that's not a complaint), Michael Atkinson remarks that the director uses "objective" sound, not "subjective" sound. It's true that the sounds that fill the film's soundtrack are given us from the external world, often through the protagonist's car radio and sometimes simply through the ether. But I'd disagree with Atkinson. I don't think this is just use of objective sound to a parallel the film's fragmented and "subject-less" subject and narrative. Yes, it's a different use of sound, but it's a complication of subjective sound, not a departure from it. After all we hear the soundtrack, and therefore we can't but believe that the subject hears them.

The use of sound here is interesting, I think, because the protagonist is not hearing them but producing them. We're given the sounds as he hears them, but they echo and resound within his schizophrenic mind, as they are the schizophrenic's world. Voices unattributed, perhaps real, perhaps recollected, but certainly not sounds that anchor the schizophrenic to reality. Rather, sounds that divorce him from the world, catching him as abruptly as an unexpected blow to the head. Short, sharp, shocks that knock about and bring into consciousness commands, put-downs, and other forms of verbal punishment that trouble us for their detachment. We don't know who's saying them. Which means we don't know why they are being said, which means (as Atkinson notes), we don't know what to think of them.

Where Atkinson hangs these sounds on a reel of film though, my sense is that they should be hung on memory, which is not a reel of film, is certainly subjective, if not multiply subjective, and is not objective in the slightest for the simple reason that memories can't be. Our schizophrenic protagonist's relation to sound is that he's caught in a compulsive listening, but cannot hear. The coup in Kerrigan's sonic genius, I think, is that in memory is the protagonist's pain, and it's a pain he suffers, often, without making the slightest of sound. But for the one that we hear.


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