Against a plain, unchanging blue screen, a densely interwoven soundtrack of voices, sound effects and music attempt to convey a portrait of Derek Jarman's experiences with AIDS, both ... See full summary »

Director:

Derek Jarman

Writer:

Derek Jarman
Reviews
2 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
John Quentin John Quentin ... Narrator (voice)
Nigel Terry ... Narrator (voice)
Derek Jarman ... Self / Narrator (voice)
Tilda Swinton ... Narrator (voice)
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Storyline

Against a plain, unchanging blue screen, a densely interwoven soundtrack of voices, sound effects and music attempt to convey a portrait of Derek Jarman's experiences with AIDS, both literally and allegorically, together with an exploration of the meanings associated with the colour blue. Written by Michael Brooke <michael@everyman.demon.co.uk>

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Genres:

Biography | Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The lines "Our name will be forgotten in time, no-one will remember our work [etcetera]", and "our lives will run like sparks through the stubble" are adapted from the book in the Biblical Apocrypha "The Wisdom of Solomon", Chapters two and three respectively. See more »

Quotes

Narrator: The Council replied they were not concerned
[about HIV awareness]
Narrator: since "there are no queers in the district. Although you might try District X, they have a theatre".
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Connections

Spoofed in The Adam and Joe Show: Episode #2.2 (1997) See more »

Soundtracks

'Scheherazade' from 'The Masques'
Composed by Karol Szymanowski
Performed by Jan Latham-Koenig
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User Reviews

 
Nothing
4 March 2004 | by bennybenbenjSee all my reviews

There is nothing I can write here that hasn't been written before about this film. A masterpiece. A seemingly 'dull' film. A brave and courageous final farewell from a great man.

Art for Arts Sake? Ars Gratia Artis? No. Absolutely not. This is a film made by a dying man while practically on his deathbed. His sight robbed of him, what more could an experimental film-maker do?

A powerful script telling of his life ('I'm sitting in a cafe....'), the things around him (the cyclist who nearly knocks him over to then hurl abuse at him), his lifestyle (I am a cock sucking straight acting lesbian man, I am a not-gay).

Jarman's Voice Over is the most provocative text about one's own death I know of. Of course, he knew he was dying. His doctors told him he was dying. He goes into graphic details of his medications, his symptoms, his pains. Never again can a film maker describe their own death in such a way, Jarman has done it and done it brilliantly.

The Blueness also plays a part. After a few minutes I felt angry, annoyed at having to stare at a screen of blue. I tried looking at the floor, closing my eyes, anything to avoid the blue. But I kept looking back.

A Masterpiece. Simple as that.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK | Japan

Language:

English

Release Date:

3 December 1993 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Blue See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

GBP90,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby SR

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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