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Star Wars 9 Brings in Richard E. Grant and Naomi Ackie

The cast of Star Wars 9 has officially been announced by Disney and Lucasfilm as filming is set to kick off next week. In addition to plenty of familiar faces, both from the original trilogy and the last couple of adventures in a galaxy far, far away, some new cast members have officially boarded what is being billed as the final chapter in the Skywalker saga by the studio. Those new additions include Richard E. Grant and Naomi Ackie.

Of the two new additions, Naomi Ackie is certainly the lesser-known, but she's not a total newbie. She starred in 2016's Lady Macbeth and was part of the cast for the TV miniseries The Five. She also starred on an episode of Doctor Who. That's something she and Richard E. Grant have in common, as he's also appeared on the long-running sci-fi series. Grant is a veteran actor with years of experience under his belt,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Star Wars 9 Brings in Richard E. Grant and Naomi Ackie

The cast of Star Wars 9 has officially been announced by Disney and Lucasfilm as filming is set to kick off next week. In addition to plenty of familiar faces, both from the original trilogy and the last couple of adventures in a galaxy far, far away, some new cast members have officially boarded what is being billed as the final chapter in the Skywalker saga by the studio. Those new additions include Richard E. Grant and Naomi Ackie.

Of the two new additions, Naomi Ackie is certainly the lesser-known, but she's not a total newbie. She starred in 2016's Lady Macbeth and was part of the cast for the TV miniseries The Five. She also starred on an episode of Doctor Who. That's something she and Richard E. Grant have in common, as he's also appeared on the long-running sci-fi series. Grant is a veteran actor with years of experience under his belt,

The Furniture: Theatrical Magic in "Fanny and Alexander"

"The Furniture," by Daniel Walber, our weekly series on Production Design returns for Season 3! Kicking off with an episode of our Ingmar Bergman Centennial Mini-Series.

There is so much to say about Fanny and Alexander. It has the visual density of The Age of Innocence, the spiritual ascent of Berlin Alexanderplatz, and Ingmar Bergman’s remarkable way with character. These elements gather together to form a benevolent and mystical dome, one which will define the young Alexander’s relationship to his family and his world. The film is built with a free sense of reality, leaping across time but lingering in resonant moments. Bergman casts the Ekdahl family as practitioners of a magical humanism, which which whisks the audience through these many hours as if in a dream.

Much of this atmosphere depends upon the film’s Oscar-winning production design.

Its furniture magic takes center stage in the first act,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Don't Recognize Ant-Man's Original Wasp? Talk to the Hand

Image Source: Getty / Valerie Macon / Afp

While it can already feel like all of your favorite actors have found their way into the McU in one way or another, Marvel continues to find ways to add new A-list talent to their ever expanding universe. The latest to join their ranks is Michelle Pfeiffer in Ant-Man and the Wasp as the original Wasp who has been lost to the Quantum Realm.

Pfeiffer first appeared in various television shows in the early 1980s, such as Delta House, B.A.D. Cats, and Fantasy Island. She had a breakout role in 1982's cult hit Grease 2, but it was really her part in 1983's Scarface (below) that put her on Hollywood's A-list.

Image Source: Everett Collection

She would go on to be nominated for Academy Awards for 1988's Dangerous Liaisons, 1989's The Fabulous Baker Boys, and 1992's Love Field. That same year, she
See full article at Popsugar »

Don't Recognize Ant-Man's Original Wasp? Talk to the Hand

Image Source: Getty / Valerie Macon / Afp

While it can already feel like all of your favorite actors have found their way into the McU in one way or another, Marvel continues to find ways to add new A-list talent to their ever expanding universe. The latest to join their ranks is Michelle Pfeiffer in Ant-Man and the Wasp as the original Wasp who has been lost to the Quantum Realm.

Pfeiffer first appeared in various television shows in the early 1980s, such as Delta House, B.A.D. Cats, and Fantasy Island. She had a breakout role in 1982's cult hit Grease 2, but it was really her part in 1983's Scarface (below) that put her on Hollywood's A-list.

Image Source: Everett Collection

She would go on to be nominated for Academy Awards for 1988's Dangerous Liaisons, 1989's The Fabulous Baker Boys, and 1992's Love Field. That same year, she
See full article at BuzzSugar »

NewportFILM Unveils Summer Slate

NewportFILM Unveils Summer Slate
NewportFILM will screen documentaries by Morgan Neville, Matt Tyrnauer, Nathanel Kahn, and Andrew Solomon as part of its annual summer series.

The festival has become something of an institution in the posh seaside community — Newport, Rhode Island is an old world resort, with Gilded Age mansions that are straight out of an Edith Wharton novel. Part of the attraction is that the sunset screenings are hosted in several different historic venues, including Rosecliff, a mansion featured in the 1974 version of “The Great Gatsby” with Robert Redford and Mia Farrow, the Eisenhower House, which was the “Summer White House” for President Dwight D. Eisenhower or his Mar a Lago, and the Newport International Polo Grounds.

The screenings kicked off Thursday with Neville’s “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?,” a look at the enduring legacy of Fred Rogers, and runs through September 6th. Past films that have played at newportFILM include Brett Morgan’s “Jane,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

NewportFILM Unveils Summer Slate

  • Variety
NewportFILM Unveils Summer Slate
NewportFILM will screen documentaries by Morgan Neville, Matt Tyrnauer, Nathanel Kahn, and Andrew Solomon as part of its annual summer series.

The festival has become something of an institution in the posh seaside community — Newport, Rhode Island is an old world resort, with Gilded Age mansions that are straight out of an Edith Wharton novel. Part of the attraction is that the sunset screenings are hosted in several different historic venues, including Rosecliff, a mansion featured in the 1974 version of “The Great Gatsby” with Robert Redford and Mia Farrow, the Eisenhower House, which was the “Summer White House” for President Dwight D. Eisenhower or his Mar a Lago, and the Newport International Polo Grounds.

The screenings kicked off Thursday with Neville’s “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?,” a look at the enduring legacy of Fred Rogers, and runs through September 6th. Past films that have played at newportFILM include Brett Morgan’s “Jane,
See full article at Variety »

Back This! Special – Ethel: A Short Film

Alzheimer’s is a horrendous disease that is unfortunately very common amongst the elderly.. There is a chance that most the people reading this post know someone or have a family member close to them dealing with Alzheimer’s… It’s a disease that is often overlooked in the mainstream media and not best represented! Director Jonny Wright and the guys at Three Wise Monkeys hope to show you a movie about the effects with their beautiful, passionate and important short film Ethel.

Overview:

Ethel is a short film that aims to raise awareness for Alzheimer’s Disease and also engage a younger audience. The film is based on a real life event that happened to the writer/director Jonny Wright. An event so powerful it burnt into his consciousness and developed over time into a gritty and grounded drama, starring Miriam Margolyes as Ethel. We hope to help promote a charity,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Here’s Everything You Can Watch With Your Amazon Prime Membership in June

  • The Wrap
Before we get to your Amazon Prime June updates, the streaming service has a special surprise for its members: every season of “Dawson’s Creek” is available now, and you don’t even have to wait until next month.

Starting June 1, stream “All or Nothing” which follows the New Zealand rugby team the All Blacks throughout their 2017 season. On June 3, you can stream the Oscar-nominated “Lady Bird,” followed by Amazon Original series “Goliath” Season 2 on June 15.

See below for the complete list of titles hitting Amazon next month.

Also Read: Amazon Sets Awards Release for Luca Guadagnino's 'Suspiria'

Available June 1

1492: Conquest of Paradise (1992)

2 Days in the Valley (1996)

Allan Quatermain and the Lost City of Gold (1987)

As Good As Dead (2010)

August Rush (2007)

Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans (2009)

Beer for My Horses (2008)

Beowulf (2007)

Black Widow (Aka: Before It Had a Name) (2005)

Blitz (2011)

Blood and Glory (2016)

Blue Like Jazz
See full article at The Wrap »

'Where Is Kyra?' Review: Michelle Pfeiffer Gives the Performance of Her Career

'Where Is Kyra?' Review: Michelle Pfeiffer Gives the Performance of Her Career
Do you remember the first time Michelle Pfeiffer showed up on your radar? Was it courtesy of one of her gangster molls, available in both coke-snorting (Scarface) and gum-snapping (Married to the Mob) varieties? Or was it via her costume dramas, playing passive heartbreakers (The Age of Innocence) and the aggressively heartbroken (Dangerous Liaisons)? Taking zero amounts of shit in Dangerous Minds? Slinking across a piano in The Fabulous Baker Boys? Licking faces in Batman Returns, the movie that inspired a thousand Halloween costumes and prepubescent fetishists? Pfeiffer has played
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Age of Innocence

Martin Scorsese commands the screen without a single profane word or gunshot to the head. His adaptation of Edith Wharton’s 1920 novel is a marvel for its year, a highly entertaining, dramatically involving epic that takes us to a world lost to time, the high-toned society of New York in the 1870s. For adult viewers, Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer and Winona Ryder form a stunning romantic triangle.

The Age of Innocence

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 913

1993 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 138 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date March 13, 2018 / 39.95

Starring: Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer, Winona Ryder, Richard E. Grant, Alec McCowen, Geraldine Chaplin, Mary Beth Hurt, Stuart Wilson, Miriam Margolyes, Siàn Phillips, Carolyn Farina, Michael Gough, Alexis Smith, Norman Lloyd, Jonathan Pryce, Robert Sean Leonard, Joanne Woodward.

Cinematography: Michael Ballhaus

Film Editor: Thelma Schoonmaker

Original Music: Elmer Bernstein

Written by Jay Cocks, Martin Scorsese

from the book by: Edith Wharton

Produced by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Martin Scorsese Unveils 38-Film Curriculum Surveying Democracy in American Cinema

Recently completing one of the longest shoots of his career with The Irishman, most other directors would consider that an accomplishment enough, but in between takes, Martin Scorsese somehow found time to construct a new curriculum as part of his “The Story of Movies” film course, produced with his company Film Foundation. This latest edition is “Portraits of America: Democracy on Film” and is free for students. However, if one would just like to follow along with their own personal screenings, the full list is available.

“We all need to make sense of what we’re seeing. For young people born into this world now, it’s absolutely crucial that they get guided,” Scorsese says (via IndieWire). “They have to learn how to sort the differences between art and pure commerce, between cinema and content, between the secrets of images that are individually crafted and the secrets of images that are mass-produced.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Martin Scorsese’s New Film Course: ‘Portraits of America’ Teaches Democracy Through Chaplin, Coppola, and More

Martin Scorsese’s New Film Course: ‘Portraits of America’ Teaches Democracy Through Chaplin, Coppola, and More
Martin Scorsese and his nonprofit organization The Film Foundation have announced their brand-new film curriculum, “Portraits of America: Democracy on Film.” The curriculum is the latest addition to the group’s ongoing film course “The Story of Movies,” which aims to teach students how to read the language of film and place motion pictures in the context of history, art, and society. Both “Democracy on Film” and the course are completely free for schools and universities.

“Portraits of America: Democracy on Film” is broken down into eight different sections, all of which include in-depth looks at some of the most important American films ever made, from Chaplin to Ford, Coppola, Spielberg, and ultimately Scorsese himself. The program is presented in partnership with Afscme. Scorsese announced the curriculum at a March 27 press conference in New York City.

“We all need to make sense of what we’re seeing,” Scorsese explained. “For
See full article at Indiewire »

The Furniture: The Age of Innocence and the Living Museum

"The Furniture" honors the Production Design of The Age of Innocence (1993) for its 25th anniversary year. The Martin Scorsese classic is newly available from the Criterion Collection. (Click on the images to see them in magnified detail.)

by Daniel Walber

The final act of Martin Scorsese’s The Age of Innocence leaps through time. The ever-roving camera comes to a temporary rest in the home of Newland Archer (Daniel Day-Lewis), married to May (Winona Ryder) and entering the longue durée of family life. But this relative physical stasis comes with the sudden acceleration of time. Scorsese and editor Thelma Schoonmaker fast-forward through years of business, leisure and child-raising. After nearly two hours of social whirlpools and lingering formalities, suddenly it’s a new century.

But despite the speed of this sequence, it’s important to pay close attention. On the wall of Newland’s family home rests one very famous painting.
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘The Age of Innocence’ Blu-ray Review (Criterion)

Stars: Daniel Day-Lewis, Winona Ryder, Michelle Pfeiffer, Richard E. Grant, Stuart Wilson | Written by Martin Scorsese, Jay Cocks | Directed by Martin Scorsese

After the sprawling brutality of Goodfellas and the operatic horror of Cape Fear, Martin Scorsese dove into this adaptation of Edith Wharton’s 1920s novel, which is set amongst the society darlings of 1870s New York. This time, the weapons are words and the gunfire sounds like whispers, but it has a violence all its own.

Newland Archer (Daniel Day-Lewis) is engaged to May (Winona Ryder) – happily, on the surface. Then May’s Polish cousin, Ellen (Michelle Pfeiffer) arrives in town. She has (relatively) unkempt hair and an unkempt manner, speaking truths to a buttoned-up social elite. The victim of an unkind marriage, she’s shamed as an outcast. Newland sympathises with Ellen. He also fancies the pants off her. But Newland has his family’s reputation to consider.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Blu-ray Review: The Age Of Innocence, Scorsese's Finest, a Transcendent Piece of Mannered Savagery

Timed to coincide with the end of the theatrical run of Daniel Day-Lewis' "final" performance in Phantom Thread (a retirement claim I will take to heart approximately 20 years from now), Martin Scorsese's 1993 period romance The Age of Innocence joins the Criterion Collection this week in a lavish 4K transfer. The film has remained my favourite of Scorsese's work since its debut a quarter-century ago, a transcendent piece of mannered savagery whose wars of unspoken words land as brutally as the bullets of Goodfellas and the fists of Raging Bull. Newland Archer (Day-Lewis) is a young American aristocrat and all-around dim bulb who is about to be married to May Welland (Winona Ryder), who makes Newland's wattage seem bright by comparison. They are vapid...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

New Blu-ray Releases: ‘Justice League’, ‘Call Me By Your Name’, ‘I, Tonya,’ ‘The Age of Innocence’ and More

New Blu-ray Releases: ‘Justice League’, ‘Call Me By Your Name’, ‘I, Tonya,’ ‘The Age of Innocence’ and More
(Welcome to Not Dead Yet, a feature dedicated to new Blu-ray releases and what special features you should be excited about. Because yes, some of us still like to own physical copies of our movies.) Welcome back to another Blu-ray round-up. There’s something for everyone here! The comic-book bombast of Justice League; the romanticism of Call Me By […]

The post New Blu-ray Releases: ‘Justice League’, ‘Call Me By Your Name’, ‘I, Tonya,’ ‘The Age of Innocence’ and More appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Review: Martin Scorsese's "The Age Of Innocence" (1993); Criterion Blu-ray Edition

  • CinemaRetro
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“What You Don’T Say”

By Raymond Benson

It wasn’t what audiences expected from a “Martin Scorsese Picture.” A period “costume drama” with no violence, bloodshed, or curse words? And yet Scorsese himself described it as one of his most violent films.

This is true, perhaps, when one considers the emotional violence that occurs between the characters in this beautifully-rendered, but curiously lifeless adaptation of Edith Wharton’s 1920 novel about New York high society and manners in the 1870s.

In many ways, The Age of Innocence is one side of a Scorsese coin that includes Gangs of New York on the other. They both take place in Manhattan in roughly the same time frame (Gangs is in the 1860s) and focus on two extremes of the social ladder—the upper crust in Age, and the lower class in Gangs.

The story is
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Oscars flashback: Daniel Day-Lewis bows before queen Helen Mirren for 2nd Best Actor win [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Daniel Day-Lewis bows before queen Helen Mirren for 2nd Best Actor win [Watch]
Exactly 10 years ago at the 80th Academy Awards, Daniel Day-Lewis won his second Oscar as Best Actor. As he arrived on stage, he bowed before “queen” Helen Mirren as she used the statuette to knight him for his victory in “There Will Be Blood” (watch the video above).

After his surprise Oscar win for “My Left Foot” at the 1990 ceremony almost two decades earlier, Day-Lewis had become an official A-List star. He followed with memorable performances throughout the early 1990s, including “The Last of the Mohicans” and Martin Scorsese’s “The Age of Innocence.” He then received an additional Oscar nomination for “In the Name of the Father,” playing the wrongfully convicted Gerry Conlin but lost the award to Tom Hanks for “Philadelphia.”

See Daniel Day-Lewis movies: Top 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best

Then came a rather slow period in Day-Lewis’ career, making no movies between 1997 and 2002. He
See full article at Gold Derby »

Close-Up on Martin Scorsese's "The Age of Innocence"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Martin Scorsese's The Age of Innocence (1993) is showing December 17, 2017 - January 16, 2018 on Mubi in the United Kingdom. Unrequited love is tragic, like an empty party; unconsummated love is worse—it's senseless like a sinkhole or a flat soufflé. That two people should love each other equally and still not be happy or together is the problem Martin Scorsese worries over in his 1993 adaptation of Edith Wharton's The Age of Innocence.The film opens in an opera—a nod to Luchino Visconti’s The Leopard (1963), a swoony film that also takes a bleak look at high society. But while that film has flourishes and cultivates dizziness, The Age of Innocence is about a love that cannot be expressed, and the pained, stately movements of non-lovers that must navigate a life apart. Daniel Day-Lewis stars as Newland Archer, a
See full article at MUBI »
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