The Age of Innocence (1993) - News Poster

News

NewportFILM Unveils Summer Slate

NewportFILM Unveils Summer Slate
NewportFILM will screen documentaries by Morgan Neville, Matt Tyrnauer, Nathanel Kahn, and Andrew Solomon as part of its annual summer series.

The festival has become something of an institution in the posh seaside community — Newport, Rhode Island is an old world resort, with Gilded Age mansions that are straight out of an Edith Wharton novel. Part of the attraction is that the sunset screenings are hosted in several different historic venues, including Rosecliff, a mansion featured in the 1974 version of “The Great Gatsby” with Robert Redford and Mia Farrow, the Eisenhower House, which was the “Summer White House” for President Dwight D. Eisenhower or his Mar a Lago, and the Newport International Polo Grounds.

The screenings kicked off Thursday with Neville’s “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?,” a look at the enduring legacy of Fred Rogers, and runs through September 6th. Past films that have played at newportFILM include Brett Morgan’s “Jane,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Back This! Special – Ethel: A Short Film

Alzheimer’s is a horrendous disease that is unfortunately very common amongst the elderly.. There is a chance that most the people reading this post know someone or have a family member close to them dealing with Alzheimer’s… It’s a disease that is often overlooked in the mainstream media and not best represented! Director Jonny Wright and the guys at Three Wise Monkeys hope to show you a movie about the effects with their beautiful, passionate and important short film Ethel.

Overview:

Ethel is a short film that aims to raise awareness for Alzheimer’s Disease and also engage a younger audience. The film is based on a real life event that happened to the writer/director Jonny Wright. An event so powerful it burnt into his consciousness and developed over time into a gritty and grounded drama, starring Miriam Margolyes as Ethel. We hope to help promote a charity,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Here’s Everything You Can Watch With Your Amazon Prime Membership in June

  • The Wrap
Before we get to your Amazon Prime June updates, the streaming service has a special surprise for its members: every season of “Dawson’s Creek” is available now, and you don’t even have to wait until next month.

Starting June 1, stream “All or Nothing” which follows the New Zealand rugby team the All Blacks throughout their 2017 season. On June 3, you can stream the Oscar-nominated “Lady Bird,” followed by Amazon Original series “Goliath” Season 2 on June 15.

See below for the complete list of titles hitting Amazon next month.

Also Read: Amazon Sets Awards Release for Luca Guadagnino's 'Suspiria'

Available June 1

1492: Conquest of Paradise (1992)

2 Days in the Valley (1996)

Allan Quatermain and the Lost City of Gold (1987)

As Good As Dead (2010)

August Rush (2007)

Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans (2009)

Beer for My Horses (2008)

Beowulf (2007)

Black Widow (Aka: Before It Had a Name) (2005)

Blitz (2011)

Blood and Glory (2016)

Blue Like Jazz
See full article at The Wrap »

'Where Is Kyra?' Review: Michelle Pfeiffer Gives the Performance of Her Career

'Where Is Kyra?' Review: Michelle Pfeiffer Gives the Performance of Her Career
Do you remember the first time Michelle Pfeiffer showed up on your radar? Was it courtesy of one of her gangster molls, available in both coke-snorting (Scarface) and gum-snapping (Married to the Mob) varieties? Or was it via her costume dramas, playing passive heartbreakers (The Age of Innocence) and the aggressively heartbroken (Dangerous Liaisons)? Taking zero amounts of shit in Dangerous Minds? Slinking across a piano in The Fabulous Baker Boys? Licking faces in Batman Returns, the movie that inspired a thousand Halloween costumes and prepubescent fetishists? Pfeiffer has played
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Age of Innocence

Martin Scorsese commands the screen without a single profane word or gunshot to the head. His adaptation of Edith Wharton’s 1920 novel is a marvel for its year, a highly entertaining, dramatically involving epic that takes us to a world lost to time, the high-toned society of New York in the 1870s. For adult viewers, Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer and Winona Ryder form a stunning romantic triangle.

The Age of Innocence

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 913

1993 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 138 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date March 13, 2018 / 39.95

Starring: Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer, Winona Ryder, Richard E. Grant, Alec McCowen, Geraldine Chaplin, Mary Beth Hurt, Stuart Wilson, Miriam Margolyes, Siàn Phillips, Carolyn Farina, Michael Gough, Alexis Smith, Norman Lloyd, Jonathan Pryce, Robert Sean Leonard, Joanne Woodward.

Cinematography: Michael Ballhaus

Film Editor: Thelma Schoonmaker

Original Music: Elmer Bernstein

Written by Jay Cocks, Martin Scorsese

from the book by: Edith Wharton

Produced by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Martin Scorsese Unveils 38-Film Curriculum Surveying Democracy in American Cinema

Recently completing one of the longest shoots of his career with The Irishman, most other directors would consider that an accomplishment enough, but in between takes, Martin Scorsese somehow found time to construct a new curriculum as part of his “The Story of Movies” film course, produced with his company Film Foundation. This latest edition is “Portraits of America: Democracy on Film” and is free for students. However, if one would just like to follow along with their own personal screenings, the full list is available.

“We all need to make sense of what we’re seeing. For young people born into this world now, it’s absolutely crucial that they get guided,” Scorsese says (via IndieWire). “They have to learn how to sort the differences between art and pure commerce, between cinema and content, between the secrets of images that are individually crafted and the secrets of images that are mass-produced.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Martin Scorsese’s New Film Course: ‘Portraits of America’ Teaches Democracy Through Chaplin, Coppola, and More

Martin Scorsese’s New Film Course: ‘Portraits of America’ Teaches Democracy Through Chaplin, Coppola, and More
Martin Scorsese and his nonprofit organization The Film Foundation have announced their brand-new film curriculum, “Portraits of America: Democracy on Film.” The curriculum is the latest addition to the group’s ongoing film course “The Story of Movies,” which aims to teach students how to read the language of film and place motion pictures in the context of history, art, and society. Both “Democracy on Film” and the course are completely free for schools and universities.

“Portraits of America: Democracy on Film” is broken down into eight different sections, all of which include in-depth looks at some of the most important American films ever made, from Chaplin to Ford, Coppola, Spielberg, and ultimately Scorsese himself. The program is presented in partnership with Afscme. Scorsese announced the curriculum at a March 27 press conference in New York City.

“We all need to make sense of what we’re seeing,” Scorsese explained. “For
See full article at Indiewire »

The Furniture: The Age of Innocence and the Living Museum

"The Furniture" honors the Production Design of The Age of Innocence (1993) for its 25th anniversary year. The Martin Scorsese classic is newly available from the Criterion Collection. (Click on the images to see them in magnified detail.)

by Daniel Walber

The final act of Martin Scorsese’s The Age of Innocence leaps through time. The ever-roving camera comes to a temporary rest in the home of Newland Archer (Daniel Day-Lewis), married to May (Winona Ryder) and entering the longue durée of family life. But this relative physical stasis comes with the sudden acceleration of time. Scorsese and editor Thelma Schoonmaker fast-forward through years of business, leisure and child-raising. After nearly two hours of social whirlpools and lingering formalities, suddenly it’s a new century.

But despite the speed of this sequence, it’s important to pay close attention. On the wall of Newland’s family home rests one very famous painting.
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘The Age of Innocence’ Blu-ray Review (Criterion)

Stars: Daniel Day-Lewis, Winona Ryder, Michelle Pfeiffer, Richard E. Grant, Stuart Wilson | Written by Martin Scorsese, Jay Cocks | Directed by Martin Scorsese

After the sprawling brutality of Goodfellas and the operatic horror of Cape Fear, Martin Scorsese dove into this adaptation of Edith Wharton’s 1920s novel, which is set amongst the society darlings of 1870s New York. This time, the weapons are words and the gunfire sounds like whispers, but it has a violence all its own.

Newland Archer (Daniel Day-Lewis) is engaged to May (Winona Ryder) – happily, on the surface. Then May’s Polish cousin, Ellen (Michelle Pfeiffer) arrives in town. She has (relatively) unkempt hair and an unkempt manner, speaking truths to a buttoned-up social elite. The victim of an unkind marriage, she’s shamed as an outcast. Newland sympathises with Ellen. He also fancies the pants off her. But Newland has his family’s reputation to consider.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Blu-ray Review: The Age Of Innocence, Scorsese's Finest, a Transcendent Piece of Mannered Savagery

Timed to coincide with the end of the theatrical run of Daniel Day-Lewis' "final" performance in Phantom Thread (a retirement claim I will take to heart approximately 20 years from now), Martin Scorsese's 1993 period romance The Age of Innocence joins the Criterion Collection this week in a lavish 4K transfer. The film has remained my favourite of Scorsese's work since its debut a quarter-century ago, a transcendent piece of mannered savagery whose wars of unspoken words land as brutally as the bullets of Goodfellas and the fists of Raging Bull. Newland Archer (Day-Lewis) is a young American aristocrat and all-around dim bulb who is about to be married to May Welland (Winona Ryder), who makes Newland's wattage seem bright by comparison. They are vapid...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

New Blu-ray Releases: ‘Justice League’, ‘Call Me By Your Name’, ‘I, Tonya,’ ‘The Age of Innocence’ and More

New Blu-ray Releases: ‘Justice League’, ‘Call Me By Your Name’, ‘I, Tonya,’ ‘The Age of Innocence’ and More
(Welcome to Not Dead Yet, a feature dedicated to new Blu-ray releases and what special features you should be excited about. Because yes, some of us still like to own physical copies of our movies.) Welcome back to another Blu-ray round-up. There’s something for everyone here! The comic-book bombast of Justice League; the romanticism of Call Me By […]

The post New Blu-ray Releases: ‘Justice League’, ‘Call Me By Your Name’, ‘I, Tonya,’ ‘The Age of Innocence’ and More appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Review: Martin Scorsese's "The Age Of Innocence" (1993); Criterion Blu-ray Edition

  • CinemaRetro
Normal 0 false false false En-us X-none X-none

“What You Don’T Say”

By Raymond Benson

It wasn’t what audiences expected from a “Martin Scorsese Picture.” A period “costume drama” with no violence, bloodshed, or curse words? And yet Scorsese himself described it as one of his most violent films.

This is true, perhaps, when one considers the emotional violence that occurs between the characters in this beautifully-rendered, but curiously lifeless adaptation of Edith Wharton’s 1920 novel about New York high society and manners in the 1870s.

In many ways, The Age of Innocence is one side of a Scorsese coin that includes Gangs of New York on the other. They both take place in Manhattan in roughly the same time frame (Gangs is in the 1860s) and focus on two extremes of the social ladder—the upper crust in Age, and the lower class in Gangs.

The story is
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Oscars flashback: Daniel Day-Lewis bows before queen Helen Mirren for 2nd Best Actor win [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Daniel Day-Lewis bows before queen Helen Mirren for 2nd Best Actor win [Watch]
Exactly 10 years ago at the 80th Academy Awards, Daniel Day-Lewis won his second Oscar as Best Actor. As he arrived on stage, he bowed before “queen” Helen Mirren as she used the statuette to knight him for his victory in “There Will Be Blood” (watch the video above).

After his surprise Oscar win for “My Left Foot” at the 1990 ceremony almost two decades earlier, Day-Lewis had become an official A-List star. He followed with memorable performances throughout the early 1990s, including “The Last of the Mohicans” and Martin Scorsese’s “The Age of Innocence.” He then received an additional Oscar nomination for “In the Name of the Father,” playing the wrongfully convicted Gerry Conlin but lost the award to Tom Hanks for “Philadelphia.”

See Daniel Day-Lewis movies: Top 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best

Then came a rather slow period in Day-Lewis’ career, making no movies between 1997 and 2002. He
See full article at Gold Derby »

Close-Up on Martin Scorsese's "The Age of Innocence"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Martin Scorsese's The Age of Innocence (1993) is showing December 17, 2017 - January 16, 2018 on Mubi in the United Kingdom. Unrequited love is tragic, like an empty party; unconsummated love is worse—it's senseless like a sinkhole or a flat soufflé. That two people should love each other equally and still not be happy or together is the problem Martin Scorsese worries over in his 1993 adaptation of Edith Wharton's The Age of Innocence.The film opens in an opera—a nod to Luchino Visconti’s The Leopard (1963), a swoony film that also takes a bleak look at high society. But while that film has flourishes and cultivates dizziness, The Age of Innocence is about a love that cannot be expressed, and the pained, stately movements of non-lovers that must navigate a life apart. Daniel Day-Lewis stars as Newland Archer, a
See full article at MUBI »

Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Age of Innocence’ and More Join Criterion Collection in March 2018

Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Age of Innocence’ and More Join Criterion Collection in March 2018
Martin Scorsese is no stranger to The Criterion Collection, but that doesn’t make the announcement that his period drama “The Age of Innocence” will be officially joining the club in March 2018 any less exciting. Scorsese’s 1993 adaptation of Edith Wharton’s seminal novel will join other Scorsese films like “The Last Temptation of Christ” in the Collection.

Read More:‘Silence of the Lambs,’ ‘Night of the Living Dead,’ and More Join Criterion Collection in February 2018

“Innocence” is one of six new movies coming to Criterion in March 2018. Other new additions include Carl Theodor Dreyer’s silent masterpiece “The Passion of Joan of Arc” and Volker Schlöndorff’s largely-unseen “Baal.” You can head over to The Criterion Collection website to pre-order the titles now. Check out all the new additions below. Synopses provided by Criterion.

Elevator to the Gallows

For his feature debut, twenty-four-year-old Louis Malle brought together a mesmerizing performance by Jeanne Moreau,
See full article at Indiewire »

Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Age Of Innocence’ & More Coming To Criterion

With Daniel Day-Lewis saying farewell to the acting game after “Phantom Thread,” you might be feeling an absence in your cinematic life. Well, this spring, The Criterion Collection will help you fill the void.

The boutique label has announced their March 2018 titles, and leading the pack is Martin Scorsese‘s “The Age Of Innocence.” The director’s underrated adaptation of Edith Wharton‘s novel, which also stars Winona Ryder and Michelle Pfeiffer, will come with a fresh 4K restoration, and new interviews with Scorsese, co-screenwriter Jay Cocks, production designer Dante Ferretti, and costume designer Gabriella Pescucci.

Continue reading Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Age Of Innocence’ & More Coming To Criterion at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Call Me by Your Name’ Could Land (at Least) Seven Oscar Nominations: Here’s Why

‘Call Me by Your Name’ Could Land (at Least) Seven Oscar Nominations: Here’s Why
Call Me by Your Name” opened Thanksgiving weekend with stellar reviews and the best limited release numbers of 2017. Sony Pictures Classics acquired the elegiac romantic drama in 2016, and with a finished movie by summer’s end, screened it for Sundance programmers who immediately wanted the film in its lineup.

Now, “Call Me by Your Name” has become a consensus favorite among critics and audiences. It’s simple yet sophisticated, an escapist summer fantasy that feels authentic, and a lovely romance between 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) and his professor father’s 24-year-old grad student Oliver (Armie Hammer). And it’s that rare four-quadrant specialty hit: embraced by straights and gays, women and men, young and old.

As classics scholars, Professor Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg) and Oliver explore the eroticism of Greek statues and fine art; Perlman admires the Grecian ideal of love between two men; he wishes he had experienced what Elio and Oliver share that summer.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Call Me by Your Name’ Could Land (at Least) Seven Oscar Nominations: Here’s Why

  • Indiewire
‘Call Me by Your Name’ Could Land (at Least) Seven Oscar Nominations: Here’s Why
Call Me by Your Name” opened Thanksgiving weekend with stellar reviews and the best limited release numbers of 2017. Sony Pictures Classics acquired the elegiac romantic drama in 2016, and with a finished movie by summer’s end, screened it for Sundance programmers who immediately wanted the film in its lineup.

Now, “Call Me by Your Name” has become a consensus favorite among critics and audiences. It’s simple yet sophisticated, an escapist summer fantasy that feels authentic, and a lovely romance between 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) and his professor father’s 24-year-old grad student Oliver (Armie Hammer). And it’s that rare four-quadrant specialty hit: embraced by straights and gays, women and men, young and old.

As classics scholars, Professor Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg) and Oliver explore the eroticism of Greek statues and fine art; Perlman admires the Grecian ideal of love between two men; he wishes he had experienced what Elio and Oliver share that summer.
See full article at Indiewire »

A Stranger Comeback: How Winona Ryder Embraced Acting Her Age After Scandal, Heartbreak and a Break From Hollywood

A Stranger Comeback: How Winona Ryder Embraced Acting Her Age After Scandal, Heartbreak and a Break From Hollywood
If there was an '80s It Girl who made the leap into the '90s and came out still cool on the other side, it was Winona Ryder.  She nailed the complex, layered teen roles in cult-classic movies like LucasHeathersBeetlejuiceEdward Scissorhands and Mermaids, all of which she had under her belt by the time she was 19. She became the poster girl for Generation X angst in the poster movie for Generation X, the Ben Stiller-helmed Reality Bites, as well as a leading lady for any era in the likes of Bram Stoker's DraculaThe Age of Innocence and Little WomenFrancis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese and Tim Burton lined up...
See full article at E! Online »

Classics Film Fest Unspools in Colombia (Exclusive)

Classics Film Fest Unspools in Colombia (Exclusive)
With Sean Baker, Trey Edwards, Chris Newman, Ed Lachman, Peter Webber and Mike Hausman among its board members, a new film festival of classic films will unspool from Nov. 10 -13 in Bogota, Colombia.

Dubbed The Classics – Festival of the Films That Will Live Forever, the new film fest is founded by producer Ivonne Torres and Juan Carvajal, co-founder and artistic director of the three-year old Bogota Independent Film Festival, IndieBo.

Buoyed by sell-out crowds at IndieBo last July when the festival screened restored classics via a new pact with Martin Scorsese’s Film Foundation, Carvajal said: “I saw how these movie gems – rescued and restored with the support of the Film Foundation – deserved nothing better than to be enjoyed where they belong: the big screen.”

For many moviegoers in Bogota, it was the first time to see such classics as Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s “All About Eve,” Elia Kazan’s “On the Waterfront,” and [link=nm
See full article at Variety - Film News »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites