8.0/10
51,215
277 user 57 critic

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine 

Trailer
1:27 | Trailer
In the vicinity of the liberated planet of Bajor, the Federation space station Deep Space Nine guards the opening of a stable wormhole to the far side of the galaxy.
Reviews
Popularity
162 ( 2)

Episodes

Seasons


Years



7   6   5   4   3   2   1  
1999   1998   1997   1996   1995   1994   … See all »
Won 4 Primetime Emmys. Another 55 wins & 116 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Complete series cast summary:
Avery Brooks ...  Capt. Benjamin Sisko / ... 173 episodes, 1993-1999
Rene Auberjonois ...  Odo / ... 173 episodes, 1993-1999
Cirroc Lofton ...  Jake Sisko / ... 173 episodes, 1993-1999
Alexander Siddig ...  Doctor Bashir / ... 173 episodes, 1993-1999
Colm Meaney ...  Chief Miles O'Brien / ... 173 episodes, 1993-1999
Nana Visitor ...  Major Kira / ... 173 episodes, 1993-1999
Armin Shimerman ...  Quark / ... 173 episodes, 1993-1999
Terry Farrell ...  Lt. Cmdr. Jadzia Dax / ... 150 episodes, 1993-1999
Michael Dorn ...  Lt. Cmdr. Worf / ... 102 episodes, 1995-1999

Stellar Photos From the "Star Trek" TV Universe

We've rounded up some of our favorite photos from across the "Star Trek" TV universe. Take a look at memorable moments from red carpet premieres and classic episodes.

See the gallery

Edit

Storyline

The stable wormhole discovered by the Deep Space Nine crew is known to the Bajoran people as the Celestial Temple of their Prophets. Sisko, as discoverer of the wormhole and its inhabitants, is therefore the Emissary of Bajoran prophesy. The wormhole's other end is in the Gamma Quadrant, halfway around the galaxy from Bajor. That section of space is dominated by the malevolent Dominion. The Dominion is led by the Changelings, the race of shapeshifters to which Odo belongs. As of the beginning of the sixth season, Cardassia has joined the Dominion, and together they are waging war on the Federation and their Klingon allies. The war is quickly becoming the most costly war ever for the Federation, and the Deep Space Nine crew must fight to protect their way of life. Written by Matthew D. Wilson <mdw1900@rit.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

At the edge of the Final Frontier, the Universe's greatest mystery is about to unfold!


Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

When designing the space station, illustrator Michael Okuda came up with a sprawling, asymmetrical design inspired by an oil rig. He was quite proud of it, but producer Rick Berman didn't like it. He told Okuda that ultimately the design needed to be something simple that an eight year old could draw, and still be recognized. With this idea in mind, Okuda conceived the final design. See more »

Goofs

In several episodes, Bajor is depicted as having several moons with apparently normal atmospheres and gravity. But if the moons were that large/dense/massive, they would not simply be orbiting Bajor. Bajor and the moons would be orbiting each other in a kind of cluster, which might have resulted in occasional collisions in the past. See more »

Quotes

Doctor Bashir: [Bashir is trying to expose a Replicant disguised as O'Brien under the pretence of giving him a physical] Any dizziness? Oversleeping? Lack of energy? Euphoria?
Chief O'Brien: [sarcastically] Yes! All of them! Especially euphoria! Lots of euphoria!
See more »

Crazy Credits

The opening credits for "Emissary" lacked the wormhole opening that all future episodes featured. Starting with Season 4, the opening credits included additional spacecraft and activity around the station, including the Defiant flying into the wormhole. See more »

Alternate Versions

Several episodes were originally shown as 2-hour movies. They were later edited into two-part 60 minute episodes for later airings. See more »

Connections

Referenced in American Dad!: Surro-Gate (2007) See more »

Soundtracks

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine - Main Title
Written by Dennis McCarthy
See more »

User Reviews

 
Deep Space Nine – A Space Epic for the Ages
19 November 2007 | by christian94See all my reviews

I remember reading in a plane that there was going to be a new Star Trek Series based on a space station to premiere in January 1993. I had always found the idea of Star Trek very appealing and enjoyed a few movies and original episodes now and then. At that time, I had never really got into The Next Generation which my family and friends seemed to love, but I figured I would at least give this new show a try. As I eventually sat there with my little brother and watched the two-hour pilot, little did I know that this would change my life for the next seven years, as I would have to plan my weekends so that I could catch every new episodes on Saturday nights like football fans' semi-sacred Sunday afternoons.

So why did I fall in love with the show? Why indeed do we fall in love? Well, there is always a part of the answer linked to resonance; something that stirs something strong and positive within you. The show is a whole package of powerful television and one of the best gifts I ever bough myself was the complete seven seasons in DVD. Now, besides the intangible, the 'magic' that comes from many elements like the beautiful mind that arises from firing neurons, here is why this television series is not only a great science-fiction experience, but ranks among the best television series of all time in my humble opinion.

A) The Characters

At the base of it all, the show's strength is with its interesting, conflicted and complex characters. Both the writers and actors bring life to characters that will invade your living room and your head, maybe your heart. The relationships they create on the busy space station are sure to keep you thinking, laughing or crying with them. They are very endearing and perfectly heroic and flawed. You get to know each and every one of them in a deep real-life-like layered way. You also get to see them progress and stay the same, throughout the journey.

Beyond the friendship-like familiarity that will awaken in you the characters of Odo, Quark, Jadzia, Worf, Ezri, Kira, Julian, Miles and the Siskos, the guest characters are developed in an astonishingly similar depth. Again the writers and actors pull their heart out to create the most memorable recurring characters that feel as much part of the show as the regulars. Garak, Dukat, Rom, Nog, Leeta, Vic, Martok, Gowron, Wynn and Weyoun— to name a few—are as complex as alien DNA. It is like having a basketball team with superstars on the bench to support the starting five when needed.

B) The Story

Set on a space station —and the major critic and setback for most Trekkers that prefer an exploring ship a la Enterprise—the story is far from static. In fact, with the Star Trek fashion of exploring current human questions and themes in this futuristic backdrop, DS9 will explore everything from religion, war, death, slavery, genetic engineering, homosexuality (first homosexual kiss on TV!), geniuses, heroes, rebels, politics, commerce, racism, multiple personalities, memories, continuity, resurrection, time, peace, love, parenthood, marriage, espionage, mass murders, prison, biological warfare, terrorism, to the military and martyrdom. All that and more is explored in a thoughtful, meaningful way and kudos to the show for not only exploring them, but for remaining in the interesting gray area. There is nothing black and white. Everything (and I mean everything) is questionable and an opportunity for thoughts and discussion.

The story is a balancing act between mundane nuances of life and epic goals, dreams and actions. If it is not a problem with Sisko's son at the space station school, it is the discovery of a new technology, the casual friendship of Miles and Julian, the encounter with a new race that may threaten the existence of the half the galaxy, Odo's existential crisis or the possible assassination of a prominent political or religious figure. All this is so well woven together and each has its importance in the smaller and grandeur scheme of things to make this fabricated Universe feel complete and utterly real and engaging.

C) The People

The writers, directors, cast and crew were without a doubt dedicated to make this thing work and it shows in the most obvious and subtle ways throughout the series. Actors will take the director chair on occasion to direct their colleagues or sit down with the writing team to discuss character development. Special effects, sets, costumes and make-up artists make crucial contributions to make the alien-filled universe seem believable. The passion that exists behind and in front of the camera is palpable and welcomed. You really feel that the whole production team has a common dream in bringing this labor of love to the viewer week after week. The consistent quality of the show over years (170+ episodes) from "Emissary" to "What You Leave Behind" is a testament to this desire to give more to the audience and create something to be proud of. Well, Ira et al, a sincere thank you and a hat-tipping bravo.


55 of 72 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 277 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Klingon

Release Date:

3 January 1993 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

DS9 See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Paramount Television See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(176 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed