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SeaQuest 2032 

Seaquest DSV (original title)
In the early 21st century, mankind has colonized the oceans. The United Earth Oceans Organization enlists Captain Nathan Bridger and the submarine seaQuest DSV to keep the peace and explore the last frontier on Earth.
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Popularity
2,009 ( 32)

On Disc

at Amazon

Episodes

Seasons


Years



3   2   1  
1996   1995   1994   1993  
Won 2 Primetime Emmys. Another 1 win & 5 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Jonathan Brandis ...  Lucas Wolenczak / ... 57 episodes, 1993-1996
Don Franklin ...  Commander Jonathan Ford 57 episodes, 1993-1996
Ted Raimi ...  Lt. j.g. Timothy O'Neill 57 episodes, 1993-1996
Roy Scheider ...  Captain Nathan Bridger 47 episodes, 1993-1995
Marco Sanchez ...  Sensor Chief Miguel Ortiz 44 episodes, 1993-1995
Peter DeLuise ...  Dagwood / ... 35 episodes, 1994-1996
Michael DeLuise ...  Tony Piccolo / ... 34 episodes, 1994-1996
Kathy Evison ...  Helmswoman Lonnie Henderson / ... 34 episodes, 1994-1996
Frank Welker ...  Special Vocal Effects 29 episodes, 1993-1995
Edward Kerr ...  Lt. James Brody 28 episodes, 1994-1996
John D'Aquino ...  Lt. Benjamin Krieg / ... 24 episodes, 1993-1995
Stacy Haiduk ...  Lt. Cmdr. Katherine Hitchcock 23 episodes, 1993-1994
Royce D. Applegate ...  Chief Manilow Crocker 23 episodes, 1993-1994
Stephanie Beacham ...  Dr. Kristin Westphalen 23 episodes, 1993-1994
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Storyline

By the mid-21st Century, humankind has colonized the oceans and formed the UEO--the United Earth Oceans--as a military organization to police it. Formerly a high-ranking member of the UEO, Nathan Bridger retired after the death of his wife, and retreated to an isolated island to study dolphins. An attempt is made to hijack the Seaquest DSV, the UEO's most powerful undersea vessel, and Nathan--its original designer--is convinced to return to active service, to assume command of it. His second in command is Cmdr. Jonathan Ford. In second season, the DSV added Dagwood, a prototype GELF (Genetically Engineered Life Form), Tony Piccolo, a man with surgically implanted gills, and Dr. Wendy Smith, a telepath/empath, to its crew of specialists. The series has New Age leanings, often presenting stories that deal with environmental issues or mix myth and mysticism--from ghosts to "gods"--into its science fiction. Written by Marg Baskin <marg@asd.raytheon.ca>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Beneath the surface lies the future.


Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 September 1993 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

SeaQuest 2032 See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,300,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(59 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

During the third season, several episodes were shown out of order. As a consequence, the character of Lt. Brody dies in one episode and then reappears in a later one. Similarly during the first season the episode in which Admiral Noyce is appointed UEO Secretary General aired after two episodes were broadcast with him already in this position. See more »

Quotes

O'Neill: I didn't write it, I just read it in high school.
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Crazy Credits

Brief profiles of sea-life conservation programs and efforts were shown during the closing credits of the first two seasons. 'Bob Ballard (I)' , the show's scientific advisor, narrated the first season segments; during the second year, cast members did the narration. See more »

Alternate Versions

The episode "Abalon" originally aired with Jimmy Buffett's "A Pirate Looks at Forty" playing in the background in a bar scene. In the R1 DVD release this song has been replaced by generic rock music. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Nostalgia Critic: Sidekicks (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

Such Great Patience
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

Forget "jumping the shark." Try "triple backflip over the shark."
22 October 2001 | by The_TomSee all my reviews

The sad tale of seaQuest DSV should forevermore be inscribed into a producer's guide of "what not to do" to a TV series.

The first season was hands-down one of the greatest seasons of sci-fi adventure television ever. The premise, the characters, the writing, the acting, the production design, and even one of the most inspiring opening themes ever...

I was a huge fan of Star Trek: The Next Generation, and in many respects the first season of seaQuest DSV, airing opposite TNG's seventh season, was a more interesting show. It succeeded by not copying the Trek science fiction formula, but by complementing it, with a mythology grounded more in science fact than fiction. The series just exuded the feel of smart television, whether that feeling came from the subtle nods to current scientific research coming true or the almost Sorkinesque highbrow dialogue or Dr. Rob Ballard's involvement as a consultant.

And then, well, to adapt a common internetism, the show "triple backflipped over the shark."

Perhaps the one in the opening credits.

All of a sudden, four of the more interesting characters (those played by Applegate, Beacham, D'Aquino and Haiduk) vanished into thin air. The remaining cast were neutered to shells of their former selves. The show took a nosedive as far as plotting was concerned, and instead of thoughtful stories about real issues we got pulp culled from the worst of the worst of cruddy science fiction. Psychics! Laser guns! Time travel! Plants taking over the sub! Gigantic Crocodiles! Evil Aliens(tm)! Genetically-engineered slave warriors in skimpy wetsuits!

Wherever the show could have stunk, it did. NBC, still no doubt rather proud of the fact that they'd cancelled Star Trek twenty-five years earlier, wanted silly lowest-common denominator sci-fi to grab an even bigger share of the ratings. Unfortunately for NBC, as the ratings attested, even the lowest common demoninator of Americana really had no wish to have to endure an hour of second season sQ DSV.

There is some online opinion that show redeemed itself in its third season, although I personally feel that "seaQuest 2032" was no less odious than the year that had preceded it. After pushing the magic reset button as hard as they could following the events of the second-season cliffhanger finale, the writers essentially remade the show, turfing Scheider and any pretext that they'd attempt to tell smart television ever again. The show became a hammily-acted excuse of a drama, ditching the wide-eyed wonder of the first season and turning it into a geekfest of underwater shoot-em-ups with an evil bunch of pseudo-Australian pseudo-Fascists wrapped in a coat of paper-thin political intrigue(tm). Now more of an underwater Babylon 5 (and even that's being too kind) than an underwater Star Trek, I cried few tears when NBC put the show out of its misery.

So, for all you wanna-be producers out there, a few lessons: (1) If a show is smart and popular, consider the fact that making it dumb will probably make it unpopular. (2) Never, ever toss aside characters for no reason other than to get people who'd look better in a wetsuit. (3) I'll take a talking dolphin over a bald tattooed version of Forrest Gump anyday. (4) Despite what your polling data may tell you, submarine fighters are not cool. (5) If a friggin' genius like Rob Ballard has agreed to work on your show, you're doing something right. If said friggin' genius leaves your show and you replace him with Michael deLuise attempting to read fascinating facts about penguins off a teleprompter, you're doing something wrong.


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