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David Landsberg, 'CPO Sharkey' Actor and 'Cosby' Writer, Dies at 73

David Landsberg, an actor, screenwriter and producer who appeared opposite Don Rickles on CPO Sharkey and penned and produced episodes of Bill Cosby’s CBS sitcom, has died. He was 73.

Landsberg died Sunday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles from complications that arose from surgery for esophageal cancer, his daughter, Caryn O'Neill, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Landsberg also wrote and/or produced episodes of Blossom, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Herman's Head, Fantasy Island, The New Love Boat and The John Larroquette Show and co-created with Brenda Hampton (7th Heaven) a 1994 CBS sitcom called Daddy's Girls, starring Dudley Moore, Harvey Fierstein and Keri ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

‘Golden Girls’ Producer Paul Junger Witt Dies at 77

  • Variety
‘Golden Girls’ Producer Paul Junger Witt Dies at 77
Paul Junger Witt, producer of such TV comedies as “The Golden Girls,” “Benson,” and “Soap” and a principal of the prosperous Witt/Thomas/Harris Productions, died Friday in Los Angeles. He was 77.

Witt had faced a long battle with cancer, a family representative said.

With producing partner Tony Thomas, Witt in the 1970s and 80s ran Witt/Thomas Productions, which was also home to NBC’s “Empty Nest” and “Blossom” and the original “Beauty and the Beast” series. In 1983, Witt married writer-producer Susan Harris, creator of NBC’s “Golden Girls,” and the company expanded as Witt/Thomas/Harris Productions.

In addition to his TV work, Witt was a producer of such films as 1989’s “Dead Poet’s Society,” 1999’s “Three Kings,” 2002’s “Insomnia,” and 2011’s “A Better Life.”

Born in New York City, Witt graduated from the University of Virginia. He got his start in Hollywood in the mail room of Columbia Pictures.
See full article at Variety »

Harry Anderson, 'Night Court' Actor, Dead at 65

Harry Anderson, 'Night Court' Actor, Dead at 65
Harry Anderson, the actor, comedian and magician best known for playing Judge Harry Stone on the sitcom Night Court, died Monday at his home in Asheville, North Carolina. He was 65.

"This morning at 6:41 a.m. the Asheville Police Department responded to the home of actor Harry Anderson where he was found deceased," the Asheville Police Department confirmed told the Hollywood Reporter. "No foul play is suspected."

Anderson started his career as a magician before turning to comedy and, eventually, acting. "I started in magic and then I got out
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Harry Anderson Dies: ‘Night Court’ Star & ‘Cheers’ Actor Was 65

  • Deadline
Harry Anderson, who earned multiple Emmy nominations for playing Judge Harry T. Stone on the NBC comedy Night Court, was found dead today at a home in Asheville, Nc. He was 65. No cause of death was reported, but Asheville Police Pio Christina Hallingse confirmed his death to Deadline and said they do not suspect foul play.

Anderson appeared in three Season 1 episodes of NBC’s Cheers as local flim-flam man/magician Harry “The Hat” Gitties, including a memorable sting episode in which he starred. That role — which he would reprise a few times later on the then-rising sitcom — led to his landing the lead in Night Court. The sitcom also starring John Larroquette, Markie Post and Richard Moll followed the wacky goings-on in a Manhattan night court and its staffers led by Stone, a boyish, grinning, jeans-and-sneakers jurist who was unconventional to say the least.

It debuted in January 1984 as
See full article at Deadline »

Harry Anderson, ‘Night Court’ Star, Dies at 65

  • Variety
Harry Anderson, ‘Night Court’ Star, Dies at 65
Harry Anderson, the amiable actor who presided over the NBC comedy “Night Court” for nine seasons, has died at his home in Asheville, N.C., according to a local media report. He was 65.

Anderson was found at his home by police officers early Monday , according to a report by Wspa-tv, the CBS affiliate in Spartanburg, S.C. No foul play was suspected, police told the station.

Anderson was a magician-turned-actor who was known as a rabid fan of jazz singer Mel Torme. The affection for Torme was woven into his TV alter ego, Judge Harry Stone, a quirky character who ruled the bench at a Manhattan night court. The sitcom was a mainstay of NBC from 1984 to 1992. Anderson earned three consecutive Emmy nominations for his work on the show from 1985-1987.

Anderson gained national attention after he guest starred as grifter Harry “the Hat” Gittes on NBC’s “Cheers” in the early 1980s.
See full article at Variety »

David Cassidy Dead at 67

David Cassidy Dead at 67
Actor and singer David Cassidy, who rose to fame as Keith Partridge in the classic ’70s series The Partridge Family, has died of organ failure. He was 67 years old.

He passed away on Tuesday surrounded by his family, his publicist JoAnn Geffen confirmed to Variety: “On behalf of the entire Cassidy family, it is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our father, our uncle, and our dear brother, David Cassidy. David died surrounded by those he loved, with joy in his heart and free from the pain that had gripped him for so long. Thank you for
See full article at TVLine.com »

Vanessa Williams Joins ‘Me, Myself & I’ As John Larroquette’s Love Interest

Vanessa Williams is set to join the CBS comedy Me, Myself & I in a recurring role opposite John Larroquette. The Emmy-nominated actress will play Kelly Frasier, Older Alex Riley’s (Larroquette) arch-rival who eventually becomes his love interest. "I have been a huge fan of Vanessa Williams for a long time. Seeing her in the role of Kelly, playing off of John Larroquette, is like attending the Olympic Games…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Me, Myself & I: Season One Ratings

CBS cancelled three sitcoms after the 2016-2017 television season, so the Tiffany Network could really do with some more laughs. Will its new Me, Myself & I TV show crash or soar? Cancelled or renewed for season two? Stay tuned. A single-camera comedy, Me, Myself & I stars Bobby Moynihan, Jack Dylan Grazer, Brian Unger, Jaleel White, Kelen Coleman, Christopher Paul Richards, Mandell Maughan, Skylar Gray, Reylynn Caster, Sharon Lawrence, and John Larroquette. The CBS sitcom focuses on the defining moments in the life of Alex Riley. In 1991, Alex (Grazer) is a 14-year-old transplant from Chicago to L.A. In 1991, at age 40, his wife has left him, and Alex (Moynihan) wants to maintain his relationship with his daughter. By 2042, in the wake of a mild heart attack, 65-year-old Alex (Larroquette) is ready to retire and start anew.
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

CBS' Me, Myself & I Has a Plan to Conceal Stars' Height Difference

CBS' Me, Myself & I Has a Plan to Conceal Stars' Height Difference
Can 40-year-old Bobby Moynihan possibly grow up to look like John Larroquette, gaining among other things a good six inches of height in the process?

RelatedFall TV First Impression: CBS’ Me, Myself & I

That was a recurring topic as CBS’ Me, Myself & I held court at the Television Critics Association summer press tour on Tuesday. The freshman sitcom stars five-time Emmy winner Larroquette, SNL vet Moynihan and Jack Dylan Grazer as wannabe inventor Alex Riley — at age 65 in the year 2042, at age 40 in the present day and as a 14-year-old in the year 1991. Meaning, all three actors are all playing the same role,
See full article at TVLine.com »

Fall TV First Impression: Me, Myself & I

Fall TV First Impression: Me, Myself & I
The broadcast networks have nearly 20 shows debuting this fall, including the maiden space voyage of Fox’s Orville, NBC’s look at Brave heroes and ABC’s Ten Days with Kyra Sedgwick. To help you prep for it all, TVLine is offering First Impressions of the not-for-review pilots.

Next up on our list….

The Show | Me, Myself & I (Mondays at 9:30/8:30c, premiering Sept. 25)

The Competition | NBC’s The Voice, ABC’s Dancing With the Stars, Fox’s The Gifted (new) and The CW’s Valor (new)

Related Read Our First Impressions of ABC’s Ten Days in the Valley,
See full article at TVLine.com »

Sharon Lawrence Joins Me, Myself & I CBS Pilot as Diner Boss in Year 2042

Sharon Lawrence Joins Me, Myself & I CBS Pilot as Diner Boss in Year 2042
Four-time Emmy nominee Sharon Lawrence will play opposite five-time Emmy winner John Larroquette in CBS’ ambitious Me, Myself & I comedy pilot.

RelatedPilot Season: Scoop on Fall’s (Possible) New Shows, Who’s In Them

Penned by Dan Kopelman (Galavant), the single-camera comedy examines the life of one man, Alex Riley, over a 50-year span, focusing on three distinct periods — as a 14-year-old in the year 1991, as a 40-year-old in present day (played by SNL‘s Bobby Moynihan), and as a 65-year-old in 2042 (played by Larroquette).

Per our sister site Deadline, Lawrence will play Eleanor, who in 1991 was the unrequited love of Alex’s life,
See full article at TVLine.com »

Sharon Lawrence Joins ‘Me, Myself & I’ CBS Pilot; ‘Mission Control’ Adds Wunmi Mosaku

NYPD Blue alumna Sharon Lawrence is set as a series regular opposite John Larroquette and Bobby Moynihan in CBS' single-camera comedy pilot Me, Myself & I. Written by Dan Kopelman and directed by Randall Einhorn, Me, Myself & I examines one man's life over a 50-year span. The show will focus on three distinct periods in Alex Riley's life: as a 14-year-old in 1991, a 40-year-old in present day (Moynihan) and a 65-year-old in 2042 (Larroquette). Lawrence will play Eleanor…
See full article at Deadline TV »

John Larroquette Joins Bobby Moynihan in CBS Comedy Pilot Me, Myself & I

John Larroquette Joins Bobby Moynihan in CBS Comedy Pilot Me, Myself & I
Bobby Moynihan has seen his future, and it is John Larroquette.

Larroquette (The Librarians) has signed on to play an older version of the same character played by Moynihan in CBS’ single-camera comedy Me, Myself & I, our sister site Deadline reports.

RelatedPilot Season ’17: Scoop on This Fall’s (Possible) New Shows, Who’s In Them

The potential series examines the life of Alex Riley over a 50-year span, focusing on three distinct periods — as a 14-year-old in 1991, a 40-year-old in present day, and a 65-year-old in 2042.

Larroquette’s Alex — the 65-year-old — is newly retired, successful in the ways he
See full article at TVLine.com »

11 Questions: John Larroquette on Samuel Beckett, possums, and fuckwads

In 11 Questions, The A.V. Club asks interesting people 11 interesting questions—and then asks them to suggest one for our next interviewee.

John Larroquette made his name as the amoral, unabashedly sleazy attorney Dan Fielding on Night Court, a role that earned him a then-record four Emmys in a row—and one that, aside from a shared wicked sense of humor, bore little resemblance to the thoughtful, genteel actor with a passion for rare books. Larroquette’s gotten closer since then by playing the Thomas Pynchon-loving main character on The John Larroquette Show and more recently as the nigh-omniscient researcher on TNT’s The Librarians (whose third season wraps January 22). But those who only know him from sitcoms or movie roles like Stripes or Meatballs 2 likely know little of the man with a zeal for Samuel Beckett. So we put Larroquette to our 11 Questions in ...
See full article at The AV Club »

What's Changed? People's 1996 Special Report on the Exclusion of African-Americans from Hollywood Remains All Too Relevant

  • PEOPLE.com
What's Changed? People's 1996 Special Report on the Exclusion of African-Americans from Hollywood Remains All Too Relevant
This year, controversy over the repeated snubbing of African-American actors from the Oscars has once again dominated headlines.Twenty years ago, a special report in People examined diversity in the movie industry and labeled Hollywood's "continued exclusion of African-Americans" as "a national disgrace".The report was reexamined five years later in a follow up exposé, and while People uncovered encouraging signs of improvement, the African-American actors interviewed made it clear they felt the industry still had a long way to go.Now, another fifteen years later, and with calls to boycott the award show gaining traction, the original article appears
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

What's Changed? People's 1996 Special Report on the Exclusion of African-Americans from Hollywood Remains All Too Relevant

  • PEOPLE.com
What's Changed? People's 1996 Special Report on the Exclusion of African-Americans from Hollywood Remains All Too Relevant
This year, controversy over the repeated snubbing of African-American actors from the Oscars has once again dominated headlines.Twenty years ago, a special report in People examined diversity in the movie industry and labeled Hollywood's "continued exclusion of African-Americans" as "a national disgrace".The report was reexamined five years later in a follow up exposé, and while People uncovered encouraging signs of improvement, the African-American actors interviewed made it clear they felt the industry still had a long way to go.Now, another fifteen years later, and with calls to boycott the award show gaining traction, the original article appears
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

John Larroquette -- Alleged Crash Victim Cries Owww ... His Insurance Co. Is Screwing Me

  • TMZ
"Night Court" star John Larroquette was involved in a brutal car accident that severely injured a reality TV star, who claims he can't get no satisfaction ... from John or his insurance company.  The alleged victim is Joe Meinwieser -- a tattoo artist on Oxygen's "Tattoos After Dark" -- and his list of injuries are horrific: broken ribs, fractured spine, fractured hand, and loss of half his kidney. Meinwieser claims Larroquette made an illegal turn out of a Venice,
See full article at TMZ »

Review: John Ridley aims high with ABC's 'American Crime'

  • Hitfix
Review: John Ridley aims high with ABC's 'American Crime'
Even before he won an Academy Award for "12 Years a Slave," John Ridley had an interesting, eclectic career. He's written for sitcoms ("The John Larroquette Show") and dramas ("Third Watch") and even produced Wanda Sykes' talk show. A decade before "Empire," he created a hip-hop industry drama for Upn called "Platinum." As a novelist, he's written science-fiction ("Those Who Walk in Darkness"), pulp ("Everybody Smokes in Hell") and historical fiction ("A Conversation with the Mann"), among other genres. Whether by design, opportunity, or simply a sense of restlessness — one of the most vivid characters in any of his books is Brain Nigger Charlie from "The Drift," a hobo who can no longer relate to the anchored middle-class existence from which he descended — Ridley has avoided being pigeonholed in a business that tries to do that with everyone, and particularly with artists of color. That sense of ambition and motion
See full article at Hitfix »

Christian Kane interview: Angel, The Librarians, Statham

Sarah chats to Angel's Christian Kane about new Syfy show The Librarians, Joss Whedon, Jason Statham and more...

Libraries are a little bit magical, aren’t they? They’re one of the few places you’re still asked to be quiet and reverential; they’re packed full of all sorts of knowledge and stories; and they’re organised due to some kind of arcane system that the average person on the street won’t have a hope of navigating. Okay, so nowadays you can learn pretty much anything you want to know just by firing up Wikipedia, but there’s still something impressive about all those words being housed in one place. In both Buffy The Vampire Slayer and Terry Pratchett’s Discworld, libraries are places for arcane magic to take place.

In a series of TV movies from the early 2000s starring Noah Wyle, librarians are mystical guardians of all kinds of magic.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Mitch Hurwitz Signs Multi-Year Deal With Netflix

When Mitch Hurwitz and Netflix first hooked up in 2013 – for new episodes of his award-winning show, Arrested Development – it seemed like the perfect match. Though he started out working for regular TV networks, on series such as The Golden Girls and The John Larroquette Show, those standard broadcasting channels – with all their restrictive regulations – were never able to provide him with the platform he needed to really let his flag fly. Even Arrested Development – the creation for which he is most famous – had to fight to remain seated at the Fox table. Thankfully, those days are gone now that Hurwitz has signed a multi-year deal with the streaming market leader - giving the writer/producer/director the space he needs to fully unfurl his creative wings.

When Arrested Development was cancelled in 2007, it’s highly revered main cast – Jason Bateman, Will Arnett, Tony Hale, Jeffrey Tambor, Alia Shawkat, Michael Cera,
See full article at We Got This Covered »
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