Lorenzo's Oil (1992) - News Poster

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Why You Recognize The Handmaid's Tale Ann Dowd

It's exciting enough to receive one nomination on Emmys morning, but imagine being nominated multiple times in the same year for two different roles. Enter Ann Dowd, nominated for supporting actress in a drama series for the role of Aunt Lydia on Hulu's The Handmaid's Tale and guest actress in a drama series for her portrayal of Patti Levin on HBO's The Leftovers. And now, she's Emmy winner Ann Dowd and Critics' Choice award winner Ann Dowd! RelatedThe Handmaid's Tale Star Ann Dowd's Haunting Words About Our Reality If you're wondering where else you've seen this 61-year-old star of stage and screen, the answer is . . . basically everywhere. Dowd is a quintessential "Hey, it's that guy/gal" character actor, starting with her work in '90s movies Lorenzo's Oil, Philadelphia, and Apt Pupil. She then moved on to TV for recurring roles in shows like Freaks and Geeks, The Education of Max Bickford,
See full article at BuzzSugar »

92 Days til Oscar. Some Living Trivia For Ya!

Did you know the earliest Oscar year which boasts 20 acting nominees who are still with us is 1992? It's the 25th anniversary of that year and that's the furthest back in time you can go from which all the acting nominees are still walking this earth. With the very noticeable exception of long retired Gene Hackman (no one has been able to convince him to come back to the movies -- and directors have tried!) most of them are still working, too. The lesson is simple: cherish your favorite actors while they're with us because no one lasts forever... except through their art!

The nominees that year were:

Leading

Actress Leading

Actor Supporting

Actress Supporting

Actor Deneuve

Indochine Downey Jr

Chaplin Davis

Husbands & Wives Davidson

Crying Game McDonnell

Passion Fish Eastwood

Unforgiven Plowright

Enchanted April Hackman

Unforgiven ★ Pfeiffer

Love Field Rea

Crying Game Redgrave

Howards End Nicholson

A Few Good Men
See full article at FilmExperience »

Mad Max to Fury Road: George Miller and David Stratton in conversation

George Miller and David Stratton in conversation.

David Stratton and George Miller had a wide-ranging chat at the Chauvel last night as guests of the French Film Festival, of which both are patrons.

Miller described growing up in Chinchilla, where he fell in love with movies during the saturday matinees at the local cinema, which was his "secular cathedral".

He also praised Stratton's tenure at the Sydney Film Festival and its influence on a generation of Australian filmmakers..

Miller's short, Violence in the Cinema, Part 1, played at the festival in 1971, as part of the Benson and Hedges awards.

The cigarette manufacturer was the only company willing to sponsor a festival for Australian shorts, joked Stratton, who also queried the title of Miller's short - "there was never a part two".

Violence in the Cinema starred Arthur Dignam, and was programmed before a film by Vittoria de Sica. Miller recalled his
See full article at IF.com.au »

Can you pass HitFix's hard-harder-hardest Oscar Quiz?

  • Hitfix
Can you pass HitFix's hard-harder-hardest Oscar Quiz?
Last year HitFix threw down a 21-question quiz for Oscar fanatics, and this year we're at it again. Join us for an ultimate Oscar test featuring three tiers of difficulty: hard, harder, and hardest. Get out a notepad! The answers are on the next page. (Please note that the term "actor" can mean a man or a woman, and that any listed year refers to the time of the movie's release, not the year of the ceremony.) Hard 1. What's the highest-grossing of this year's eight Best Picture nominees? 2. Jennifer Jason Leigh just received her first Oscar nomination for Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight. Only two performances in Quentin Tarantino's filmography have earned Academy Awards. Who performed those roles? 3. Which of this year's Best Picture nominees stars a character named Joy? 4. Who's the only person in history to win both an acting Oscar and a songwriting Oscar? 5. Name one
See full article at Hitfix »

Oscar Trivia: First Time Lucky

Refresh your screen periodically for updates as this post will evolve

If you missed the Oscar nominations  this morning you can check out the full list at our Official Nomination Index Page. The individual Oscar charts will take some time to update but should go up throughout the day. But while we're all gathered let's have so fun checking off some trivia and stats. This post is dedicated to the first timers in Oscar's club.

Feel free to contribute "firsts" in the comments!

First Time Lucky

Mad Max Fury Road is the first live action sequel ever nominated for Best Picture whose original wasn't nominated. In fact the entire Mad Max franchise had received zero nominations up until this morning. Mad Max is only the second sequel ever nominated for Best Picture whose original wasn't up for the same prize. The only other example is Toy Story 3 (the first
See full article at FilmExperience »

Awards Season Recap: Nbr Gave First Indication that 'Mad Max' Could Be a Top Contender

'Mad Max: Fury Road': National Board of Review Best Film Award winner. National Board of Review 2015 Awards: First indication of 'Mad Max: Fury Road' awards season potential Going over the December 2015 movie awards not previously discussed on this site, we begin with the National Board of Review Awards, announced on Dec. 1. (Scroll down for the full list of winners.) Not including the Gotham Awards, which specifically honors independent American cinema, the National Board of Review was the first group to announce their Best of the Year picks this awards season. As a result, they were the first to indicate that George Miller's action-thriller Mad Max: Fury Road would be a major awards contender this year. Since then, among other awards and nominations, Mad Max: Fury Road – a Mad Max reboot of sorts starring Charlize Theron, Tom Hardy, and Nicholas Hoult – has been shortlisted for two Golden Globes, including Best Picture - Drama,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

How They Shot the Spectacular War Rig Chase in George Miller's 'Mad Max: Fury Road'

How They Shot the Spectacular War Rig Chase in George Miller's 'Mad Max: Fury Road'
"Fury Road" was a reinvigorating adventure for veteran cinematographer John Seale, who came out of retirement to collaborate once again with George Miller. Only this was no "Lorenzo's Oil," the last film he shot for Miller. With usual "Mad Max" Dp Dean Semler out of the picture, Seale stepped out of his comfort zone to tackle the reboot, which turned out to be the best action film in years — and in what is still the best post-apocalyptic franchise. "The whole film is basically a chase [in the desert landscape of West Africa with 75 vehicles], but was originally envisioned as a 3D shoot and they were building their own stereoscopic cameras," recalled the Oscar-winning Seale ("The English Patient"). "But then George changed his mind after I signed on. I was able to trim the 3D rig down because our 2D cameras are much smaller and lighter and it became more versatile for George." Still, it was Seale's first digital...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Oscar-winning cinematographer John Seale on reuniting with George Miller for 'Mad Max: Fury Road' (Exclusive Video)

Oscar-winning cinematographer John Seale on reuniting with George Miller for 'Mad Max: Fury Road' (Exclusive Video)
Cinematographer John Seale first worked with director George Miller back in 1992 on "Lorenzo's Oil," an intimate drama that bears few similarities to the high octane action of their second collaboration, “Mad Max: Fury Road.” As he tells us during a recent webcam chat (watch below), he came on board this epic reboot of the franchise at a very late stage, just months before shooting was set to start. “When George rang, it was a bit of a shock that he did, because it was so late in pre-production. But it was quite easy, in a way, to make a decision to go with him and help him make the film.” -Break- Subscribe to Gold Derby Breaking News Alerts & Experts’ Latest Oscar Predictions Now 73, Seale reveals he had not shot a film since “The Tourist” in 2010. “I’ve retired after every movie for the last 15 years,” admits the veteran lenser who
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sarandon, Nolte Re-Team For TV's "Graves"

Susan Sarandon will make her regular TV series debut opposite Nick Nolte in the original comedy "Graves" for Epix.

Sarandon will play Margaret Graves, the wife of a former U.S. president (Nolte), who begins to pursue her own political ambitions when her husband decides to right the wrongs of his administration twenty years after leaving office.

The project will mark the second time Nolte and Sarandon have played a married couple following 1992's "Lorenzo's Oil".

Joshua Michael Stern will write and exec produce the ten-episode series with production beginning this Fall ahead of a Fall 2016 airing on Epix.

Source: Variety
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Box-Office Alternatives: The Witches of Eastwick

Mad Max: Fury Road is one of those sequels many were hoping would become a reality, yet few actually believed would see the light of day. The continuation of what is undoubtedly Australia's most popular film franchise at last comes to the big screen in a dark yet sprawling apocalyptic action piece just ripe for summertime audiences.

Without question the biggest plus in Mad Max: Fury Road was in bringing back the series' original director, George Miller. The director made his name helming the previous movies in the franchise before creating one of the most unpredictable filmographies in Hollywood, with features ranging from Lorenzo's Oil (1992) to Happy Feet (2006). However, no choice Miller made in his post-Mad Max days remained as standout as his first Hollywood outing, The Witches of Eastwick (1987).

Based on a novel by John Updike, The Witches of Eastwick centered on three women (Cher, Susan Sarandon and
See full article at Slackerwood »

Exclusive: Mad Max director George Miller talks stunts, Tom Hardy, & sequels

  • JoBlo
One of my favorite filmmakers of all time is the legendary George Miller. From Happy Feet to Babe: Pig In The City to Lorenzo's Oil, he has proven to have incredible range as a storyteller. And growing up with the fantastic Mad Max series, he was a major influence on the way I viewed movies. The Road Warrior is still one of my favorite action adventure flicks ever, and I couldn't be happier to see Mad Max: Fury Road show audiences the master of...
See full article at JoBlo »

Reeve Receives Standing Ovation at Oscar Ceremony (Video)

Christopher Reeve Foundation for spinal cord and stem cell research (photo: Darryl Hannah and Christopher Reeve in 'Rear Window') (See previous post: "'Superman' Christopher Reeve and his Movies: Ten-Year Death Anniversary.") In his 1998 autobiography Still Me, Christopher Reeve recalled: "At an especially bleak moment [prior to an operation that might result in his death], the door [of his hospital room] flew open and in hurried a squat fellow with a blue scrub hat and a yellow surgical gown and glasses, speaking in a Russian accent. For the first time since the accident, I laughed. My old friend had helped me know that somehow I was going to be okay." The "old friend" was the recently deceased Robin Williams, whom Reeve had befriended while both were studying at Juillard. Eventually, Reeve became a staunch advocate for spinal cord and stem cell research, sponsoring with his wife the Christopher Reeve Foundation — later renamed the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation (and formerly known
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

James Rebhorn obituary

Actor who played FBI agents, cops and traditional fathers

Anyone looking for an actor to play an unyielding martinet could hardly have done better over the last few decades than to cast James Rebhorn, who has died aged 65 after suffering from skin cancer. Poker-thin and poker-faced, this white-haired, crinkle-eyed performer excelled at bringing a glint of bureaucratic bloody-mindedness to small parts that might otherwise have slipped past unnoticed. He could be sympathetic too, even slightly buffoonish, as proved by his turn as the father of the gadabout Dickie Greenleaf (Jude Law) in The Talented Mr Ripley (1999), but he could also turn on a dime from charm to vindictiveness.

His speciality was playing officialdom in all its manifestations: cops, FBI agents, doctors, politicians. Asked in 2012 about his repeated appearances in legal dramas (he starred on television in Boston Legal, Law & Order, The Practice and The Good Wife, among others), he drew
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

James Rebhorn obituary

Actor who played FBI agents, cops and traditional fathers

Anyone looking for an actor to play an unyielding martinet could hardly have done better over the last few decades than to cast James Rebhorn, who has died aged 65 after suffering from skin cancer. Poker-thin and poker-faced, this white-haired, crinkle-eyed performer excelled at bringing a glint of bureaucratic bloody-mindedness to small parts that might otherwise have slipped past unnoticed. He could be sympathetic too, even slightly buffoonish, as proved by his turn as the father of the gadabout Dickie Greenleaf (Jude Law) in The Talented Mr Ripley (1999), but he could also turn on a dime from charm to vindictiveness.

His speciality was playing officialdom in all its manifestations: cops, FBI agents, doctors, politicians. Asked in 2012 about his repeated appearances in legal dramas (he starred on television in Boston Legal, Law & Order, The Practice and The Good Wife, among others), he drew
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

James Rebhorn Passes Away at 65

James Rebhorn Passes Away at 65
Actor James Rebhorn passed away on Friday after losing his long battle with melanoma. He died peacefully at his home in South Orange, New Jersey at the age of 65. He is survived by his wife Becky and two daughters Hannah and Emma. They are planning a religious service to take place in New Jersey.

Leading Artist Dianne Busch had this to say about the actor.

"He was an absolute joy to work with. He was very funny and was warm. He was drawn to projects with a social conscience. One of his favorite movies that he did was Lorenzo's Oil, because it made a difference. He had a very strong faith and loved his family. His family was extremely important to him and I saw him make career sacrifices for them."

He had a long history in television, but he most recently appeared in Showtime's drama Homeland and USA's White Collar.
See full article at MovieWeb »

R.I.P. James Rebhorn

Prolific character actor James Rebhorn has passed away at the age of 65. Rebhorn died from melanoma, which had been diagnosed with in 1992.

Rebhorn had managed to stave off that skin cancer for the past twenty years - and portrayed many of his most famous on screen roles during that time. He worked right up until last month, and died Friday afternoon at his home in New Jersey. He is survived by his wife and two daughters.

The actor had memorable key supporting roles in a variety of films such as "The Game," "Independence Day," "My Cousin Vinny," "The Talented Mr. Ripley," "Basic Instinct," "Scent of a Woman," "Meet the Parents," "Regarding Henry," "Lorenzo's Oil," "Guarding Tess," "Cold Mountain," "Far from Heaven," "White Squall," "Wind," "Shadows and Fog," "White Sands," "Carlito's Way," "My Fellow Americans," "Real Steel," "The International," "Baby Mama," and "The Box".

He also appeared in numerous TV shows like "Seinfeld,
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Actor James Rebhorn Dead at 65

James Rebhorn, a character actor who played the father of Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes) on "Homeland," in addition to countless roles in movies and TV, has passed away. He was 65 years old. "He died from melanoma, which had been diagnosed in 1992," said his agent Dianne Busch. "He fought it all this time. He died Friday afternoon at his home in New Jersey, where he had been receiving hospice care for a week and a half." During his five-decade career, Rebhorn is known for sending the "Seinfeld" cast to jail in the 1998 finale of the show, as a witness in "My Cousin Vinny" and recurring roles on "Third Watch," "White Collar," "The Practice," "Boston Legal," "30 Rock," and "Law and Order." He also played parts in such films as "Scent of a Woman," "The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle," "Regarding Henry," "Basic Instinct," "Lorenzo's Oil," "Guarding Tess," "Independence Day," "The Game," "The Talented Mr. Ripley,
See full article at Worst Previews »

'Independence Day' Character Actor James Rebhorn Dies at Age 65

While losing a lead actor like Philip Seymour Hoffman is always devastating, it's never easier when a fantastic supporting actor leaves this world. Therefore, we're disheartened to report that character actor James Rebhorn has passed away at age 65 after a battle with skin cancer, according to THR. Lately, Rebhorn had been seen most prominently on the small screen as Claire Danes' father on the Showtime drama series "Homeland," not to mention a recurring role on the USA series "White Collar." But Rebhorn also appeared on the big screen, and was easily one of the better known "Hey, it's that guy!" actors. Rebhorn has appeared in over 100 projects, including various episodes of television and feature films. The actor's more prominent roles on the big screen included Desperate Hours, Regarding Henry, Basic Instinct, Lorenzo's Oil, The Scent of a Woman, Guarding Tess, Independence Day, The Game, The Talented Mr. Ripley, Meet the Parents,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Augusto Odone obituary

Father who was determined not to let his gravely ill son die, and inspired the film Lorenzo's Oil

The tale of the determined amateur who proves the professionals wrong is always a compelling one, but with Augusto Odone – who has died aged 80 – it went much deeper. In 1984, his youngest child, Lorenzo, just a month away from his sixth birthday, was diagnosed with adrenoleukodystrophy (Ald), a neurological disorder that causes the degeneration of the brain in young boys. "We were told to go home and watch Lorenzo die," Odone recalled. Neither he nor his wife, Michaela, was prepared to do that.

And so Augusto, an economist based at the World Bank in Washington DC, who had no scientific training, spent the time that he was not caring for his boy in the library of the George Washington University near his home, trying to understand Ald. It was, he read, linked to
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Doctor Bello's Faith-Based Hoodoo Could Not Save Itself

The worst thing about Doctor Bello's tacky, pseudo-spiritual proceedings isn't how bad the soap opera melodramatics are (Tyler Perry would blush!), but rather how lazily sketched out its story of one man's road to self-actualization is. The film's writers left no cliché unused, and no major plot point undeveloped. Dr. Durant (Isaiah Washington) has exhausted his resources in a quest to cure a 13-year-old of his cancer. Durant turns to Dr. Bello (Jimmy Jean-Louis), a Nigerian practitioner of holistic medicine, who saves the little boy with a mysterious vial of liquid and an unhealthy dose of faith-based hoodoo. But when Bello succumbs to cancer, Dr. Durant must fly to Nigeria in search of a Lorenzo's Oil-style cure. The quest is paint-by-numbers nonsense, and Doc...
See full article at Village Voice »
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