5.4/10
31,108
108 user 61 critic

The Lawnmower Man (1992)

R | | Horror, Sci-Fi | 6 March 1992 (USA)
Trailer
2:03 | Trailer

On Disc

at Amazon

A simple man is turned into a genius through the application of computer science.

Director:

Brett Leonard

Writers:

Stephen King (title only), Brett Leonard (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
3 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jeff Fahey ... Jobe Smith
Pierce Brosnan ... Dr. Lawrence Angelo
Jenny Wright ... Marnie Burke
Mark Bringelson ... Sebastian Timms
Geoffrey Lewis ... Terry McKeen
Jeremy Slate ... Father Francis McKeen
Dean Norris ... The Director
Colleen Coffey ... Caroline Angelo
Jim Landis Jim Landis ... Ed Walts
Troy Evans ... Lieutenant Goodwin
Rosalee Mayeux ... Carla Parkette
Austin O'Brien ... Peter Parkette
Michael Gregory ... Security Chief
Joe Hart ... Patrolman Cooley
John Laughlin ... Jake Simpson
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Storyline

A scientist performs experiments involving intelligence enhancing drugs and virtual reality on a simple-minded gardener. He puts the gardener on an extensive schedule of learning, and quickly he becomes brilliant. But at this point the gardener has a few ideas of his own on how the research should continue, and the scientist begins losing control of his experiments. Written by Ed Sutton <esutton@mindspring.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

God made him simple. Science made him a god.

Genres:

Horror | Sci-Fi

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, sensuality and a scene of violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK | USA | Japan

Language:

English

Release Date:

6 March 1992 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Stephen King's The Lawnmower Man See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$10,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$7,751,971, 8 March 1992, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$32,101,000

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$150,000,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (director's cut)

Sound Mix:

Dolby SR

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jenny Wright (Marnie) did only the close-ups in the VR strobe scene, because the strobe light made her sick. Her wide-angle shots were done using a double, and the close-ups of her face were done with a bluescreen, so that she didn't have to move. See more »

Goofs

When Timms is upbraiding Angelo for being naive, he says that money has been dirty "...since the Catholic Church got involved in banking 300 years ago." But in fact, the Knights Templar (an arm of the Catholic Church) first began banking in 1129 A.D. Timms was off by 600 years. See more »

Quotes

Jobe Smith: I am god here!
See more »

Crazy Credits

This Film is Dedicated to the Memory of Our Co-Producer MILTON SUBOTSKY See more »

Alternate Versions

A director's cut was released with 39 minutes of additional footage which included the following material:
  • When Rosco 1138 was shot in the theatrical version he died, but in the directors cut he survived
  • A scene when Jobe Smith meets Rosco 1138 by Rosco attacking him, but Rosco looks at his pupils and sees he is not a threat
  • Dr. Angelo gives some soliders a briefing on capturing Rosco.
  • Jobe speaks to Rosco thinking he is a comic book super hero called Cyboman.
  • Father McKeen finds Rosco with Jobe and calles V.S.I., Dr. Angelo's place of work.
  • The soliders go to Jobe's house and Dr. Angelo wants to get Rosco alive, but the soldiers kill Rosco and Jobe goes nuts and starts to cry.
  • Father McKeen talks to Jobe and tells him how he endangered the church by letting Rosco in his house.
  • Jobe and Terry McKeen are at the gas station and Jobe tells Terry and Jake about Cyboman and Jake makes fun of him while Terry just doesn't make fun of him at all.
  • Dr. Angelo talks into his audio journal and wonders why Rosco bonded with the retarded man Jobe.
  • In the theatrical version Dr. Angelo's wife leaves him, but in the director's cut she goes out with her friends. Dr. Angelo follows her to her car and she leaves; then he talks to Peter's mom [Carla Parkett] and they talk about how Peter reminds him of himself at that age.
  • Terry McKeen and Jobe are in a diner and Jake starts harrassing him about Cyboman.
  • Father McKeen sees Jobe reading and yells at him and Terry defends him and tells Father McKeen to let Jobe be a man. Then Father McKeen leaves and tells Jobe he'll teach him to drive, but he learnt how already with the V.R. treatments hes been getting from Dr. Angelo.
  • Jobe is with Dr. Angelo on the way to V.S.I. and asks if he is going to do to him what he did with Rosco.
  • Jobe is scared because he can read minds; he asks Mrs. Angelo where Dr. Angelo is and he reads her mind (she thinks that "the asshole is probably jerking off with his computer").
  • Dr. Angelo asks his wife where Jobe is and she does not respond because she is under Jobe's control.
  • Dr. Angelo is tied up and his wife asks if he and Jobe need anything, still being under his control.
  • The agents are going to pick up Jobe and Dr. Angelo when Jobe tells Dr. Angelo "Now you will witness the impossible" and makes Dr. Angelo watch his wife kill an agent and then is killed by the other two while he watches through V.R.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Bad Movie Beatdown: Die Another Day (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Game of Hearts
Written by Gregg Leonard, Joel Hazard
Performed by Creative Rite
Courtesy of Reality Buffers Music
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
An enjoyable trainwreck
10 July 2005 | by BrandtSponsellerSee all my reviews

Given the absolute trainwreck that this film is in many respects, it's surprising that the story works as well as it does once it gets going. The middle of the film is actually somewhat engaging, there are scenes where odd flashes of competence shine through, and the beginning of the climax, at least, is pretty suspenseful, even though it peters out when it should be reaching a fevered pitch. Even with the plethora of problems, The Lawnmower Man is worth watching for fans of "so bad it's good" films (even though this isn't exactly so bad that it's good), just to witness the atrocious special effects (almost all CGI) and the bizarre concatenation of elements that it's almost impossible to imagine anyone thought would be a good idea if they weren't intentionally shooting for a comedy or an absurdist genre film. Yes, director/writer Brett Leonard, co-writer Gimel Everett and the production team were serious, and thought that they were producing a cutting-edge, hip and thrilling genre film--something like the Matrix of its time. That alone is funny enough once you've seen a few minutes of the film to make this worth a watch.

The story has two protagonists, one of which eventually becomes something of an anti-hero. The film begins with a text prediction about just how prevalent and influential virtual reality will be at the turn of the 21st Century. In retrospect, it underscores just how ridiculously inflated revolutionary or "savior" technology predictions tend to be. We then meet Dr. Lawrence Angelo (Pierce Brosnan before he was in a position to turn down starring roles), who is engaged in virtual reality research for the government (his superiors call their project/division "The Shop"). He's experimenting on monkeys, and per his superior's orders, the focus is on military uses--the monkey is being virtual reality trained in battle strategy while they're manipulating its aggression levels. As anyone who has seen at least two or three genre films could guess, this ends up backfiring. The monkey freaks out and runs rampant through the secret government facility, attacking employees.

Dr. Angelo semi-voluntarily goes on hiatus. He had wanted to eventually test human subjects for susceptibility to his virtual reality "mind expansion", without the emphasis on violence, but that seems a lost cause. However, after his wife leaves him, he decides that maybe he can do the research on his own. He decides that the perfect test subject is the titular lawnmower man--his neighbor Jobe Smith (Jeff Fahey). Jobe happens to be developmentally disabled. Of course, things do not go exactly as planned with the tests on Jobe, either, especially once The Shop gets wind of what Dr. Angelo is doing.

The Lawnmower Man grew out of a Stephen King short story that most famously appeared in his Night Shift collection. The King story is only a few pages long, and it bears almost no resemblance to the film. The only scene that's at all similar is the one involving a lawn mower and Peter Parkette's (Austin O'Brien) father. It might be informative for those who have a less than consistently favorable opinion of King-oriented films to note that King sued to have any reference to his name removed. I actually like most King-oriented films, but I find the suit amusing, too.

What makes The Lawnmower Man such a trainwreck? The most prominent problem, because it is such a focus of the film, is the CGI. When Dr. Angelo is working with human subjects in The Shop's facilities, they wear "spiffy" spandex suits reminiscent of Tron (1982). That may be enough of a problem in itself (and just who made those suits if Dr. Angelo had never been authorized to work with humans?), but the bigger problem is that the CGI is also reminiscent of Tron. That's not to say that Tron isn't successful, but it had very primitive CGI. There, it was more excusable for three reasons. One, it was made in the late 1970s/early 1980s, when CGI _had_ to be much more primitive. Two, realizing this, Tron director Steven Lisberger aimed at creating more of a minimalist world. And three, once introduced to us, most of Tron took place in that world.

By the early 1990s, computer graphics had progressed quite a bit. Yet, Leonard allows The Lawnmower Man's CGI sequences to almost exclusively consist of brightly colored, low-resolution, simple geometric shapes floating around in a featureless world. Admittedly, The Lawnmower Man was a bit low-budgeted. But I'm not sure that excuses computer graphics that look like they were done on a Commodore 64 by someone working through a basic pixel animation book. And this stuff is supposed to "accelerate the evolution of the human mind?" It wouldn't matter so much if this were not the crux of the film. But the CGI is as important here as the scenes inside The Matrix are to that film. The effects work a bit better when they're integrated with cinematography. But Leonard avoids that more than he should.

And the CGI isn't the only problem. The story otherwise is extremely awkward. Most of it is unintentionally absurdist. Jobe lives in a little shack in an otherwise normal suburban neighborhood. A sadistic priest regularly flogs him. A beautiful widow seduces him. Peter's family is almost a spoof of the typical King family, with an abusive, alcoholic father. All of these people bizarrely live right next door to Dr. Angelo. I could go on and on, but there isn't room.

Still, there are aspects of the story that work. When Leonard finally gets around to death scenes, they're pretty good. The suspense stuff when Dr. Angelo is in Washington is good. And the overall arc about Jobe transforming, but getting out of control and seeking revenge is enjoyable, pithy and certainly a classic, archetypal plot. But this isn't anything if it's not a mixed bag. Watch expecting a trainwreck, and you should be entertained for an evening.


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