7.7/10
76,128
126 user 95 critic

Porco Rosso (1992)

Kurenai no buta (original title)
Trailer
2:37 | Trailer
In 1930s Italy, a veteran World War I pilot is cursed to look like an anthropomorphic pig.

Director:

Hayao Miyazaki

Writer:

Hayao Miyazaki
3 wins. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Shûichirô Moriyama Shûichirô Moriyama ... Kurenai no Buta (voice)
Tokiko Katô Tokiko Katô ... Jina-sama (voice)
Bunshi Katsura Vi Bunshi Katsura Vi ... Pikkoro-oyaji (voice) (as Bunshi Katsura)
Tsunehiko Kamijô Tsunehiko Kamijô ... Manmayuto no shachô (voice)
Akemi Okamura ... Fio Pikkoro (voice)
Akio Ôtsuka ... Donarudo Kâchisu (voice)
Hiroko Seki Hiroko Seki ... Bâ-chan (voice)
Reizô Nomoto Reizô Nomoto ... Mamma Aiuto Gang (voice)
Osamu Saka Osamu Saka ... Mamma Aiuto Gang (voice)
Yû Shimaka Yû Shimaka ... Mamma Aiuto Gang (voice)
Mahito Tsujimura Mahito Tsujimura ... (voice)
Minoru Yada ... (voice)
Michael Keaton ... Porco Rosso (voice)
Susan Egan ... Gina (voice)
David Ogden Stiers ... Grandpa Piccolo (voice)
Edit

Storyline

In Early 1930's era Italy air pirates, bounty hunters and high fliers of all sorts rule the skies. The most cunning and skilled of these pilots is Porco Rosso. A former Ace, he now makes a living flying contract jobs, such as rescuing those kidnapped by air pirates. Donald Curtis, Porco's rival in the air and in catching the affections of women, provides a constant challenge to the hero, culminating in a hilarious, action packed finale. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for violence and some mild language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Porco Rosso's plane engine has the brand Ghibli stamped, and although there isn't such an engine, the animation studio's name was taken from an Italian airplane, the Caproni Ca.309 Ghibli, which had double Alfa-Romeo engines. See more »

Goofs

Near the end of the film when Porco and Curtiss are fight in their planes they crash into a tower, which sends up a variety of international flags. The United States of America flag that appears during this sequence has only 11 stripes and 20 stars, a configuration that never existed. (There were 20 stars on the flag in 1818-1819, but 13 stripes. It's unlikely this is mean to be a rare, nearly 100-year-old flag that has lost it's bottom two stripes.) Most likely it is a simplification for animation. See more »

Quotes

Porco Rosso: A pig's gotta fly.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The opening text explaining the setting is given in Japanese, Italian, Korean, English, Chinese, Spanish, Arabic, Russian, French and German. See more »

Connections

Featured in Troldspejlet: Episode #30.6 (2003) See more »

Soundtracks

Tokini wa mukasi no hanashi wo
(theme song)
Written and Performed by Tokiko Katô
Arrangements by Yôko Kanno
See more »

User Reviews

 
Well, it's Miyazaki. What'd you expect?
7 May 2005 | by crowrobotSee all my reviews

"Porco Rosso" is probably the first animated Humphrey Bogart film. Why? The title character, a WWI flying ace who has been transformed into a pig, reminded me of Bogart with his gruff manner and that world-weary cynicism that instantly endears us to Bogart. "Porco Rosso" is also a highly entertaining adventure film, and Miyazaki has once again created a slew of characters you can either cheer for or hiss vehemently at them.

The US dub is done particularly well (Disney tends not to muck Miyazaki's movies up most of the time), with Michael Keaton hitting that Bogart vibe as the title character. Keaton was obviously the first choice on the dubber's mind for this character, and he performs excellently. Susan Egan is the voice of Madame Gina, Porco's friend who loves him but he doesn't quite get it. Cary Elwes, who is of course British, does a convincing Southern accent as the movie's main villain, Curtis, a hotshot American pilot who challenges Porco. David Ogden Stiers shows off his vocal chameleon skills as Piccolo, Porco's mechanic friend; Stiers's voice sounds genuinely Italian, and I must again wonder: How does he do it? Anyway, moving on. Kimberly Williams, whom you may or may not remember from the Steve Martin version of "Father of the Bride", is spunky as Fio, the other main female character who becomes Porco's partner (albeit reluctantly on his part).

All in all, "Porco Rosso" is a highly entertaining movie, and it should be seen by everyone.


40 of 52 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 126 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Disney [United States]

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese

Release Date:

16 December 1994 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Porco Rosso See more »

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$156,270, 20 May 2018

Gross USA:

$443,059

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,354,729
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed