A Grand Day Out (1989) - News Poster

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The art of Aardman: why Wallace never learns and Gromit never needs to speak

An element of deep nostalgia accompanies the Australian opening of the exhibition Wallace & Gromit and Friends: the Magic of Aardman

My brothers and I could agree on precisely one thing when we were children: Wallace and Gromit. We must have watched the bumbling, cheese-loving inventor and his highly intelligent dog fly to the moon in their homemade rocket and thwart a jewel heist by a devious penguin literally hundreds of times, yet we never got sick of it.

These short stop-motion films, (A Grand Day Out, 1989, and The Wrong Trousers, 1993) created by Aardman Animations, were such formative part of my childhood that I approached an adult rewatch with some trepidation. I need not have worried: Wallace and Gromit are just as funny, just as lively, just as delightful at the age of 32 as they were at the age of eight. Furthermore, for an adult, they come with an extra layer
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

‘Wallace and Gromit’ Pays Tribute to Peter Sallis, Voice of the Cheese-Loving Wallace — Watch

‘Wallace and Gromit’ Pays Tribute to Peter Sallis, Voice of the Cheese-Loving Wallace — Watch
Following the sad news that Peter Sallis has taken his last grand day out, the folks behind “Wallace and Gromit” have paid tribute to the departed actor. Sallis voiced the human half of the duo from its inception until 2010, including four short films (“A Grand Day Out,” “The Wrong Trousers,” “A Close Shave” and “A Matter of Loaf and Death”) and the feature film “Curse of the Were-Rabbit”; his gentle voice is one of the beloved stop-motion series’ most distinctive traits. Watch the video below.

Read More: Peter Sallis, Voice of Wallace in ‘Wallace and Gromit’ Series, Dead at 96

“At the time when I did it, I didn’t think this is going to make cinema history” he says as clips of the cheese-loving Wallace play. “But six years later in 1989, when the phone went and he said, ‘I finished it,’ I thought, ‘Oh, it’s only taken him six years.
See full article at Indiewire »

Peter Sallis, Voice of Wallace in Wallace and Gromit, Passes Away at 96

Peter Sallis, Voice of Wallace in Wallace and Gromit, Passes Away at 96
Peter Sallis, who is best known for voicing Wallace in the animated Wallace and Gromit movies, has passed away at the age of 96. He died on Friday at his home in the U.K. and reportedly died peacefully. Peter Sallis' acting career lasted more than 60 years, with his first role dating back to 1947. He continued acting until 2010 before retiring from the business.

With more than 150 credits to his name, Peter Sallis was very prolific during his long career, but there are two roles for which he will always be remembered. One being Wallace, a role which he first took on in 1989 in the Wallace and Gromit short A Grand Day Out. He also played Norman Clegg on Summer Wine, the longest-running British sitcom in history. Per Deadline, his agents Jonathan Altaras Associates released this statement.

"It is with sadness that we announce that our client Peter Sallis died peacefully,
See full article at MovieWeb »

5 Secrets Behind Aardman’s Stop-Motion Animation, from ‘Wallace & Gromit’ to ‘Early Man’

5 Secrets Behind Aardman’s Stop-Motion Animation, from ‘Wallace & Gromit’ to ‘Early Man’
Aardman co-founder Peter Lord grabbed a ball of clay before his conversation last week at the Fmx International Conference on Animation, Effects, Vr, Games and Transmedia in Stuttgart, Germany, and slowly molded a puppet of Morph, Aardman’s first creation, while discussing 40 years of stop-motion glory at its animation studio in Bristol, England.

From “Wallace & Gromit” to “Creature Comforts” to “Shaun the Sheep,” Aardman will be firmly dedicated to the hand-crafted technique of stop-motion as long as audiences continue to embrace it. For Lord, who co-founded Aardman with school chum David Sproxton before adding animator-director Nick Park to the creative team, it’s all about the comedy of manners and empathy.

Here are Lord’s five rules for stop-motion animation:

1. Never forget the importance of Ray Harryhausen.

When Lord was ten years old, he saw “Jason and the Argonauts” and was so amazed at the brilliance of stop-motion animator Ray Harryhausen
See full article at Indiewire »

Newswire: The Wallace & Gromit cinematic universe will expand with Shaun The Sheep Movie 2

Aardman Animations and Studiocanal are planning to produce a sequel to the Oscar-nominated 2015 children’s film Shaun The Sheep Movie, to be directed by the first film’s co-director Richard Starzak, Deadline reports. What’s not immediately apparent, though, is that this not merely a follow-up to a successful film, but an expansion of a 27-year-old complex expansive universe of short films, feature films, and TV shows known as the Aardmaniverse. The fact that you’re probably not even familiar with that term really just goes to show how little respect this umbrella of droll storytelling gets. Named for studio Aardman Animations, the shared universe is an ever-expanding outgrowth of British stop-motion animator Nick Park’s 1989 short films Wallace & Gromit: A Grand Day Out (about a man and his dog) and Creature Comforts (in which human interview subjects are replaced with animated animals).

In his third Wallace ...
See full article at The AV Club »

The 27 greatest stop motion movies of all time

Sean Wilson Sep 16, 2016

With Kubo & The Two Strings now playing, we salute some of our favourite stop motion animated movies...

With Laika's visually sumptuous and breathtaking stop motion masterpiece Kubo And The Two Strings dazzling audiences throughout the country, what better time to celebrate this singular and remarkable art form?

The effect is created when an on-screen character or object is carefully manipulated one frame at a time, leading to an illusion of movement during playback - and such fiendishly intricate work, which takes years of dedication, deserves to be honoured. Here are the greatest examples of stop motion movie mastery.

The Humpty Dumpty Circus (1898)

What defines the elusive appeal of stop motion? Surely a great deal of it is down to the blend of the recognisable and the uncanny: an simulation of recognisably human movement that still has a touch of the fantastical about it. These contradictions were put
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Evolution of Stop-Motion Animation in Film Over the Years

I love the art of stop-motion animation, and I couldn’t be happier that there’s a studio like Laika keeping the art form alive. They recently released the film Kubo and the Two Strings, which is easily one of the best films I’ve seen this year. As a tribute to the art of stop-motion, Vulgar Efendi created a wonderful video that shows us how stop-motion animation has evolved through the years. It starts with the year 1900 and takes us all the way through 2016. It’s 116 years of stop-motion awesomeness in only three minutes! You'll find a full list of films featured in the video below.

The films included are:

- The Enchanted Drawing (1900)

-Fun at the Bakery Shop (1902)

-El Hotel Electrico (1905)

-Humorous Phases of Funny Faces (1906)

-The Cameraman's Revenge (1912)

-The Night before Christmas (1913)

-Häxan (1922)

-The Lost World (1925)

-The Tale of Fox (1930 version)

-King Kong
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Eddie to be Heard, Not Seen

Perhaps sensing that everyone will be sick of looking at him by the tail end of 2017 (what with the multiple Oscar nominated transformations, the actual Oscar, and that new Fantastic Beasts franchise), Eddie Redmayne will give his ginger mug a wee break from gigantification on the big screen. Instead he'll be leading the voice cast of Aardman's Early Man which just went into production for release in 2018. The best part of the news is that Nick Park will be directing and he's been absent from that particular chair for too long. (His last feature was 11 long years ago, the Oscar winning Curse of the Were Rabbit.)

You can pencil it in for a Best Animated Feature nomination right now (albeit two years from now) because Aardman has quite a track record of delights (sorry Flushed Away!). They've got a heavy shelf of awards to prove it including Oscar nominations for
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Academy Celebrating Aardman Animations – Wallace And Gromit Among 3 Program Event Aug 7 And 9

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences celebrates the work of Aardman Animations with three programs featuring the studio’s Oscar-winning and nominated Wallace And Gromit shorts on Friday, August 7, and Sunday, August 9.

Aardman’s latest film, Shaun The Sheep Movie, will be released in U.S. theaters on August 7.

Wallace and Gromit Restored – The Marc Davis Celebration of Animation

Friday, August 7, 7:30 p.m. │Samuel Goldwyn Theater, Beverly Hills

As part of the Academy’s Marc Davis Celebration of Animation series, Aardman Animations co-founder David Sproxton and Wallace and Gromit cinematographer Dave Alex Riddett will discuss the making of the studio’s Oscar-winning shorts “The Wrong Trousers” and “A Close Shave,” and the Oscar-nominated shorts “A Grand Day Out” and “A Matter of Loaf and Death.”

The program also will include the world premiere screening of the restorations of all four films, the result of a collaborative effort
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Wallace & Gromit: A Matter Of Loaf And Death’s nerdy spots and references

Louisa Mellor Apr 26, 2017

Puns, movie references and nods to Aardman’s past abound in Wallace & Gromit: A Matter Of Loaf And Death

Animator Nick Park’s fifth Wallace and Gromit film, A Matter Of Loaf And Death (named for the Powell & Pressburger 1946 fantasy romance A Matter Of Life And Death, the first of many such baking-related puns) became the most-watched television programme in the UK in 2008, attracting a Christmas day average audience of 14.4 million viewers. It saw 62 West Wallaby Street, Wigan, transformed into a granary, making Wallace the target of a “cereal killer” intent on ridding the world of bakers. Gromit, as ever, came to the rescue.

See related Why Alien: Isolation proves the Alien deserves another movie

We’ve scoured the half-hour short to unpack some of Aardman’s characteristic in-jokes and film references…

1. The name and look of Baker Bob, who meets an unfortunate end at the hands
See full article at Den of Geek »

Have I Got News For You tops Friday's ratings with 4.07 million

Have I Got News for You was Friday's (May 1) highest-rated show outside of soaps.

Hosted by Alexander Armstrong, the topical panel show attracted an average audience of 4.07 million (19.8%) from 9pm.

BBC One's evening began with 3.24 (19.1%) for The One Show at 7pm, followed by 3.11 million (16.9%) for A Question of Sport at 7.30pm.

A repeat showing of Wallace & Gromit: A Grand Day Out filled the void left by Masterchef at 8.35pm, and managed to secure an average audience of 2.12 million (10.9%).

Mrs. Brown's Boys entertained 2.88 million (14.4%) at 9.30pm, while The Graham Norton Show secured ratings of 2.72 million (23.1%) at 10.40pm.

Over on ITV, Weekend Escapes with Warwick Davis was seen by 2.36 million (12.5%) at 8pm, while Slow Train Through Africa with Griff Rhys Jones entertained 2.05 million (10.2%) at 9pm.

BBC Two's evening was dominated by Live Snooker: The World Championship coverage from 6.30pm until 9pm. The event drew an average audience of 1.14 million
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Alert the Kiddies! The New York International Children’s Film Festival (Nyicff) is now front and center.

Youngsters and oldsters alike…here is the reel deal: The New York International Children’s Film Festival (Nyicff) will be making its presence known in the upcoming days. On tap for the 18th annual event will be a noted variety of creative animated films and shorts for all ages to enjoy and relish. The New York International Children’s Film Festival promises to serve up an array of animated showcases that boasts all styles and formats that should prove imaginative and appealing to our past and present childhood memories.

Please note that the Nyicff will run its operation from February 27, 2015 to March 22, 2015. Additionally, the majority of these impressive feature-length and short films have experienced critical acclaim overseas. Therefore, the impact of the Nyicff’s cinematic selections should be rewarding for ardent fans of animated film fodder designed to capture the spirit of its enthusiastic viewers.

Among the films being displayed
See full article at SoundOnSight »

'The Little Mermaid' Facts: 25 Things You Didn't Know About the Disney Masterpiece

Hard to imagine, but there was a time, before the release of "The Little Mermaid," when even Disney's own studio chief didn't expect much from the movie because it was a "girl's film." But Jeffrey Katzenberg was happy to be proved wrong when the film was released 25 years ago this week (on November 17, 1989).

"The Little Mermaid" was not only an enormous critical and commercial success, but it also launched a creative renaissance in Disney's animated features (including such modern classics as "Beauty and the Beast" and "The Lion King") and a wave of princess-mania that continues to this day.

Still, as many times as you or your kids have watched "Little Mermaid" (probably many, many, many times), there's a lot you may not know about it, including who almost starred in it, who the characters were drawn to look like, and what was really up with that scene of the bishop with the bulging pants.
See full article at Moviefone »

How we made Wallace and Gromit

Gromit was a cat, Wallace had a moustache, and their first adventure was meant to be like Star Wars – but with cheese. Nick Park and Peter Lord on creating a British classic

Nick Park, creator

As soon as I started filming A Grand Day Out, the first Wallace and Gromit animation, I realised I was making a film about my dad. He loved tinkering about in the shed. He didn't look like Wallace, but somehow I could see him in his eyes – although my dad's eyes didn't meet in the middle, of course.

It was 1982 and, back then, Wallace had no eyebrows, hardly any cheeks and a moustache. And Gromit was embarrassing: he had a nose like a banana, or a cross between a banana and a pear. When Peter Sallis, who voices Wallace, said "No cheeeese, Gromit" for the first time, I realised how wide and toothy I was
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

How we made Wallace and Gromit

Gromit was a cat, Wallace had a moustache, and their first adventure was meant to be like Star Wars – but with cheese. Nick Park and Peter Lord on creating a British classic

Nick Park, creator

As soon as I started filming A Grand Day Out, the first Wallace and Gromit animation, I realised I was making a film about my dad. He loved tinkering about in the shed. He didn't look like Wallace, but somehow I could see him in his eyes – although my dad's eyes didn't meet in the middle, of course.

It was 1982 and, back then, Wallace had no eyebrows, hardly any cheeks and a moustache. And Gromit was embarrassing: he had a nose like a banana, or a cross between a banana and a pear. When Peter Sallis, who voices Wallace, said "No cheeeese, Gromit" for the first time, I realised how wide and toothy I was
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The James Clayton Column: Sci-fi films ready for a remake

Feature James Clayton 7 Feb 2014 - 06:15

With the new RoboCop out now, James considers some sci-fi films that might, just might, benefit from an imaginative remake...

They remade RoboCop. I'm still finding it hard to get my head around that fact, even as I arrive at the moment I get to see the new reboot in cinemas. RoboCop remade. Paul Verhoeven's dystopian masterpiece of 1987 - the ultimate techno-tinged sociopolitical action movie - remade. Really? I mean, really?

I'm pretty sure that in ancient aeons past a divinely-appointed prophet laser-scribed "Thou shalt not remake RoboCop, creep!" on a titanium slab of commandments to be observed by obedient future generations. Nothing is sacred though and, alas, RoboCop is remade, rebooted and upgraded in line with modern filmmaking standards for today's drastically altered multimedia marketplace.

To fill you in on the details you probably already know, the PG-13 rated reboot (really?) is
See full article at Den of Geek »

Gravity and other films that changed Hollywood for ever

Gravity is a game-changer that makes a swath of films seem redundant. Here are seven earlier movies that broke the mould – and one that didn't

Every now and then a film comes along that totally changes everything: whether it is expensive new technology or a cute talking pig, nothing can be the same again. Gravity is the latest film that makes a whole swath of cinema look and feel redundant: its hard-won sense of documentary realism means everyone attempting to film a spacewalk or satellite explosion will have to raise their game massively. This is by no means a definitive, historical list – you would have to go back to the Lumière brothers for that – but we have narrowed it down to the seven films that have made the biggest impact on movies in their current form and obsessions.

Batman (1989)

The game: Superhero films were traditionally camp, trashy affairs – even Superman: The Movie,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Apprentice Episode 6 Review – A Grand Day Out?

After the high jinks of last week in Dubai the guys and girls are back in England for the next task, and it’s something new this time — good, because I’m getting a little tired of the same ideas being recycled season after season (you want us to sell what?) — a corporate away day. Huh? Never heard of them. Oh you know: those things where all the managers and so forth get sent somewhere to learn about teamwork, bonding and problem solving. The kind of things that take people away from the office for a day, and then companies wonder why they’re losing money. Honestly, if firms spent as much time on the real day-to-day stuff as they do on these Americanised team-building exercises….

Anyway, you don’t want to hear my views on the corporate world. I’m not Luisa, though I do look well in a skirt.

'Wallace & Gromit' ride opened by show creator Nick Park in Blackpool

Nick Park has launched a brand new Wallace & Gromit theme park ride in Blackpool.

The Thrill-o-Matic ride opened on April 24 at Blackpool Pleasure Beach, with Aardman's Park joined by Managing Director Amanda Thompson and Deputy Managing Director Nick Thompson.

The ride is part of a £5.25 million investment and five years of development, and takes fans through some of the animated duo's most loved moments.

It begins in a carriage shaped as a giant slipper, before being taken through scenes from A Grand Day Out, The Wrong Trousers, A Close Shave, A Matter of Loaf and Death and The Curse of the Were Rabbit.

Nick Park, creator of Wallace & Gromit, said: "We have the perfect marriage between Wallace and Gromit and Blackpool Pleasure Beach.

"I grew up in Preston, which is just down the road so Blackpool feels like a natural home for Wallace and Gromit.

"It has been a great
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Wallace and Gromit ride in to revamp Blackpool as a grand day out

Aardman characters to launch Thrill-o-Matic ride at Blackpool Pleasure Beach as part of VisitEngland's 'staycation' campaign

Two newly appointed figureheads of a campaign to breathe fresh life into English tourism are to start working next week in Blackpool – the Lancashire seaside town that, despite its long reputation as a holiday resort, has been struggling to update its appeal.

On Wednesday Wallace and Gromit, the stars of a Oscar-winning series by Aardman Animations, are to attend the launch of the world's first theme park ride to be based on their adventures in the films A Grand Day Out, The Wrong Trousers and A Close Shave. Their creator, Nick Park, will be at their side as visitors try out the Thrill-o-Matic, the £5.25m new jewel in the crown of the Blackpool Pleasure Beach amusement park.

"I grew up in Preston, which is just down the road, so Blackpool feels like a natural home for Wallace and Gromit,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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