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‘Weird Al’ Yankovic Wrote a NY Times Crossword Puzzle, and It’s Pretty Cheesy

  • The Wrap
“Weird Al” Yankovic: Master parodist. Accordion maestro. Budding guitar god. And now, it turns out, crossword-puzzle author. “Eat It” singer Yankovic co-wrote Wednesday’s edition of the New York Times crossword puzzle, and as you might expect from someone who brought the world songs such as, well, “Eat It,” the resulting work has its share of food puns. In particular, cheese puns. The clue for 20A, for example, asks, “Cheesy military drama?” with the proper answer being, “A Few Gouda Men,” a play on the 1992 film “A Few Good Men.” Also Read: 'Weird Al' Yankovic's 'Hamilton' Polka Medley Is Patriotically Awesome (Audio) In...
See full article at The Wrap »

Cuba Gooding Jr. Recalls His ’10 Years in the Wilderness’ — and Turning Down ‘Ray’ and ‘The Last King of Scotland’

Cuba Gooding Jr. Recalls His ’10 Years in the Wilderness’ — and Turning Down ‘Ray’ and ‘The Last King of Scotland’
Few actors have had a career trajectory quite like that of Cuba Gooding, Jr. Twenty years after winning an Oscar for his role in “Jerry Maguire,” the actor has mounted a comeback of sorts after what he describes as “10 years in the wilderness” marked by forgettable straight-to-dvd projects. Now he’s done a far-reaching interview with the Guardian to discuss how he always wanted to be an actor “who does all the parts” — and how that may have harmed his career as much as it helped it.

After admitting that he’s starred in “some real clunkers,” Gooding, Jr. is asked whether he made them for the money. “Not for me,” he says. “For me, it was always about protecting the sanctity of that golden statue… Because I felt I needed to show people that I can do more, I can do better.”

That mindset dates back to his breakthrough
See full article at Indiewire »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]
Like the other acting winners of the 1980s, the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor went to big stars and character actors alike. The ’80s featured big-name winners like Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Sean Connery and Michael Caine alongside hardworking veterans like John Gielgud, Louis Gossett Jr. and Don Ameche. The Academy also rewarded emerging talent, like Timothy Hutton, Haing S. Ngor and the now double-champ Denzel Washington.

So who is your favorite Best Supporting Actor winner of the 1980s? Look back on each performance and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Timothy Hutton, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Hutton came out of the gate strong with his heartbreaking performance in Best Picture winner “Ordinary People.” Hutton plays Conrad Jarrett, a teenager wracked with guilt after his brother is killed in a boating accident. Hutton is clearly the lead of the film, but at age 20, the studio may have felt it fairer
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘I Can Only Imagine’ Directors Join Spielberg, Zemeckis, and More as Filmmakers With Two A+ CinemaScores

Hollywood is still bonkers for metrics — there’s Rotten Tomatoes to freshen up, IMDb stars to earn, Metacritic rankings to top, and the audience-friendly classic CinemaScore, which provides a handy letter grade at the end of opening weekend for each big-screen release. It’s designed to be as easily digested as an elementary school report card, but CinemaScores don’t measure quality. By their own admission, they measure “movie appeal,” and high grades often reflect canny marketing or audiences already primed to enjoy a certain film.

This weekend, moviegoers rated two new openers, the gay teen romance “Love, Simon” and the faith-based drama “I Can Only Imagine,” the highest CinemaScore possible: a sterling A+. And while it’s telling that this weekend spawned such high marks for such very different films, it also speaks to what happens when Hollywood churns out the films that certain audiences are so eager to see.
See full article at Indiewire »

NBC’s Production of ‘Bye Bye Birdie Live’ With Jennifer Lopez Pushed Again (Exclusive)

NBC’s Production of ‘Bye Bye Birdie Live’ With Jennifer Lopez Pushed Again (Exclusive)
Bye Bye Birdie Live” won’t be taking flight on NBC until 2019 at the earliest.

NBC’s planned live event production of the classic musical with Jennifer Lopez in the lead role has been delayed for a second time due to the difficulty of coordinating with Lopez’s busy schedule, Variety has learned exclusively. The project was originally slated to be NBC’s holiday musical event for winter 2017 but was pushed to 2018 last May because of Lopez’s schedule.

Lopez is shooting two movies later this year, plus she has a host of other commitments to NBC. She’s the
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]
The Best Actor Oscar winners of the 1990s include some of the most legendary actors in film history, like Anthony Hopkins, Al Pacino, Tom Hanks and Jack Nicholson. We’ve also seen actors springboard off their victories to have fruitful careers in film, like Geoffrey Rush and Nicolas Cage. Now, two decades later, which do you consider the greatest Best Actor winner of the 1990s?

Refamiliarize yourself with the winners and be sure to vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Actor.)

Jeremy Irons, “Reversal of Fortune” (1990) — The ’90s began with Jeremy Irons being awarded for “Reverse of Fortune,” in which the actor plays Claus von Bulow, a man charged with attempted murder after his wife goes into diabetic shock. Despite a long career in film this remains Irons’ only nomination and win, though he has won two Emmys for voiceover work and another for his performance in 2005’s “Elizabeth I.
See full article at Gold Derby »

10 Things About The Shawshank Redemption You Never Knew

10 Things About The Shawshank Redemption You Never Knew
The Shawshank Redemption. It's one of the best Stephen King adaptations ever made, forever linked to the already impressive filmographies of Tim Robbins and Morgan Freeman. Here we look at 10 things you never knew about The Shawshank Redemption.

It's not a biopic.

Ok, of course this is something you already knew about The Shawshank Redemption but as the movie was gearing up for production, this was actually very unclear. Frank Darabont had to shorten the movie's name from King's original title, Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption, after agents kept pitching actresses for the lead.

Stephen King licensed the story for a dollar.

Since 1976, the prolific author has offered the Dollar Baby deal. The Master of Horror will let aspiring filmmakers adapt his short stories for a single U.S. dollar. Contrary to how some have interpreted this, King still retains the rights to the stories. It's more of a license for noncommercial use.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Pete’s 2017 Media Diary

This is the fourth year publishing the list of television, movies, and books that I read throughout the year. It’s always interesting to look back on the content you have consumed with your viewing and reading habits laid out in front of you. It can be pretty scary for those not ready to truly look inside their own mind. For me, my biggest takeaway is always… “I need to read more books”. Looking through my 2017 media diary it’s hard to deny the fact I read zero books. I did however watch plenty of great television, and a few great movies. (Here’s to changing that in 2018).

2017 was the year in which my excitement for new television far exceeded my excitement for new movies. I continued my trend from 2016 where I felt I watched more television than movies. Television had a far larger impact on me, and sure there
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

'Molly's Game': How Aaron Sorkin Bet the Farm on Poker-Queen Biopic – and Won

'Molly's Game': How Aaron Sorkin Bet the Farm on Poker-Queen Biopic – and Won
There are two things you should know about Aaron Sorkin.

One is that the man likes to talk. A lot. This will not surprise anyone who's seen the 1992 screen version of his play A Few Good Men, starring Tom Cruise and Jack Nicholson. Or has watched a TV show he's had a hand in developing, like the one about an all-sports cable channel (Sports Night) or the one about an all-news cable channel (The Newsroom) or the Emmy-winning one about an all-drama idealistic White House (The West Wing). Or remembers the sharp,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Movie Review – Molly’s Game (2017)

Molly’s Game, 2017.

Directed by Aaron Sorkin.

Starring Jessica Chastain, Idris Elba, Kevin Costner, Michael Cera, Chris O’Dowd, Jeremy Strong and Graham Greene.

Synopsis:

Molly Bloom comes from a high-achieving family and becomes an Olympic skier but, when her luck runs out on the piste, she has to find another way of earning money and becomes involved in the world of high stakes poker – private games involving movie stars, musicians and anybody with plenty of cash to flash. She starts running them herself, makes a lot of money at it – until she also becomes a target for the mob. And the FBI. Based on a true story.

Hands up anybody who thought Aaron Sorkin had already directed a film. A career that’s encompassed A Few Good Men, TV’s The West Wing and screenplays for The Social Network, Moneyball and Steve Jobs all mean he’s been around
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Idris Elba on Being Aaron Sorkin’s Surrogate and the Career Highlight of ‘Molly’s Game’

Whether he’s in the projects of Baltimore, the fantastical worlds of Asgard, or, when it comes to his latest role, in an office with Jessica Chastain, Idris Elba always brings a fierce, commanding presence to his characters. In playing Charlie Jaffey–a fictitious character Aaron Sorkin created in Molly’s Game–Elba charts new territory as this lawyer is defined by his virtues, acting both as a sounding board for Molly Bloom’s troubles and a guiding light in helping her climb out of a legal hole. To top it off, Elba is also given one of the most impressive scenes of his career, a sentiment he agreed with during our conversation.

With Aaron Sorkin’s writing, scenes can be more intense than an action setpiece. What was it like to see that come to life on set?

Yeah, Sorkin is so particular that you are overly aware that
See full article at The Film Stage »

Molly's Game director Aaron Sorkin talks being in the director's chair for the first time

  • Cineplex
Molly's Game director Aaron Sorkin talks being in the director's chair for the first timeMolly's Game director Aaron Sorkin talks being in the director's chair for the first timeMarni Weisz - Editor, Cineplex Magazine12/20/2017 10:39:00 Am

Aaron Sorkin’s first day as a director didn’t go exactly as he’d hoped.

The date was November 9th, 2016, and the celebrated writer of A Few Good Men, The Social Network and Steve Jobs was in Toronto to shoot his directorial debut, Molly’s Game. The film tells the story of Molly Bloom, a competitive skier who, after being sidelined by a back injury, started running a high-stakes poker game that attracted celebrity players, including Tobey Maguire, Leonardo DiCaprio and Ben Affleck. Bloom ran into trouble with the FBI, however, after allowing players with Russian mob connections into another game she’d organized.

If that date — November 9th, 2016 — rings a bell,
See full article at Cineplex »

Molly's Game director Aaron Sorkin on bringing a wild true story to the big screen

  • Cineplex
Molly's Game director Aaron Sorkin on bringing a wild true story to the big screenMolly's Game director Aaron Sorkin on bringing a wild true story to the big screenMarni Weisz - Editor, Cineplex Magazine12/20/2017 10:39:00 Am

Aaron Sorkin’s first day as a director didn’t go exactly as he’d hoped.

The date was November 9th, 2016, and the celebrated writer of A Few Good Men, The Social Network and Steve Jobs was in Toronto to shoot his directorial debut, Molly’s Game. The film tells the story of Molly Bloom, a competitive skier who, after being sidelined by a back injury, started running a high-stakes poker game that attracted celebrity players, including Tobey Maguire, Leonardo DiCaprio and Ben Affleck. Bloom ran into trouble with the FBI, however, after allowing players with Russian mob connections into another game she’d organized.

If that date — November 9th, 2016 — rings a bell,
See full article at Cineplex »

Donald Trump Is ‘Mentally Unfit’ to Be U.S. President, Rob Reiner Says

Donald Trump Is ‘Mentally Unfit’ to Be U.S. President, Rob Reiner Says
President Donald Trump is “mentally unfit” to be U.S. leader, Rob Reiner told Variety at the Dubai Intl. Film Festival, but the director fears the American press is failing to hold the Trump administration accountable for its actions. Reiner, who is best known for “A Few Good Men,” “When Harry Met Sally…” and “The Princess Bride,” was at the festival to promote his latest movie, “Shock and Awe.”

“Donald Trump is the single-most unqualified human-being to ever assume the Presidency of the United States. He is mentally unfit. Not only does he not understand how government works, he has no interest in trying to find out how it works,” Reiner said, when asked to compare Trump with President Lyndon Johnson, who was the subject of Reiner’s recently released biopic “Lbj.”

Reiner added: “Lbj – except for the Vietnam War, which is a terrible stain on his legacy – was probably the most effective and successful President as far
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Awards Chatter' Podcast — Aaron Sorkin ('Molly's Game')

"For me, growing up, writing was just a chore to be gotten through for a school assignment," says Aaron Sorkin — the writer of A Few Good Men, Malice, The American President, Sports Night, The West Wing, Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip, Charlie Wilson's War, The Social Network, Moneyball, The Newsroom, Steve Jobs and 2017's Molly's Game, an adaptation of the memoir of Molly Bloom, a former Olympic-level skier who ran bicoastal poker games that landed her in the sights of the FBI and the Russian mob — as we sit down in his dimly lit and...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

'Awards Chatter' Podcast — Aaron Sorkin ('Molly's Game')

'Awards Chatter' Podcast — Aaron Sorkin ('Molly's Game')
"For me, growing up, writing was just a chore to be gotten through for a school assignment," says Aaron Sorkin — the writer of A Few Good Men, Malice, The American President, Sports Night, The West Wing, Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip, Charlie Wilson's War, The Social Network, Moneyball, The Newsroom, Steve Jobs and 2017's Molly's Game, an adaptation of the memoir of Molly Bloom, a former Olympic-level skier who ran bicoastal poker games that landed her in the sights of the FBI and the Russian mob — as we sit down in his dimly lit and...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Oscar Fortunes Appear to Rise and Fall, but It’s Just the Golden Globes

Oscar Fortunes Appear to Rise and Fall, but It’s Just the Golden Globes
Nominations for the 75th annual Golden Globe Awards are in as the 2017-2018 film awards season adds yet another notch to its belt. There were snubs, there were surprises, but nothing about Monday morning’s announcement would appear to have significantly altered the course of the circuit. Then again, nothing ever really does; these are just the opinions of a few dozen international journalists who happen to have their own highly rated, liquored-up, televised awards ceremony. Let’s dive in and take a look at what all of it actually means …

Star power

The HFPA has long been noted for its love affair with the stars. This year the group found ways to ensure that people like Angelina Jolie (“First They Killed My Father”), Steve Carell (“Battle of the Sexes”), Tom Hanks (“The Post”), Denzel Washington (“Roman J. Israel, Esq.”), Hugh Jackman (“The Greatest Showman”), Mary J. Blige (“Mudbound”), and even Mariah Carey and Nick Jonas (songs
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Playback: Aaron Sorkin on ‘Molly’s Game’ and the Draw of Courtroom Dramas

Playback: Aaron Sorkin on ‘Molly’s Game’ and the Draw of Courtroom Dramas
Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety podcast bringing you exclusive conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films.

As one of Hollywood’s preeminent writers, Aaron Sorkin has left his mark on the stage (“A Few Good Men”), big screen (“The Social Network”) and small screen (“The West Wing”) throughout his career. But with “Molly’s Game,” he tried his hand at directing for the first time. The result is a distinctively Sorkin experience, the unbridled vision of an artist finally deigning to take the wheel.

Listen to this week’s episode of “Playback” below. New episodes air every Thursday.

Click here for more episodes of “Playback.”

In high-stakes “poker princess” Molly Bloom’s story, Sorkin saw an opportunity to present a unique movie heroine, one who exemplifies the characteristics of romanticism and idealism that have often driven his work.

“I was expecting to meet someone, frankly, I wasn’t going to respect very much
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Molly’s Game’ Director Aaron Sorkin on How Harvey Weinstein Made Film ‘Surprisingly Relevant’

  • The Wrap
‘Molly’s Game’ Director Aaron Sorkin on How Harvey Weinstein Made Film ‘Surprisingly Relevant’
A version of this story first appeared in the Actors/Directors/Screenwriters issue of TheWrap’s Oscar magazine. Aaron Sorkin has been writing plays since 1984, films since 1992 and television since 1998 — but despite his success with the films “A Few Good Men,” “The American President,” “The Social Network” and “Steve Jobs” and the TV series “Sports Night,” “The West Wing” and “The Newsroom,” he had never directed a film until this year’s “Molly’s Game.” The film stars Jessica Chastain as the real-life Olympic skier who ran afoul of the law after running a series of high-stakes, star-studded poker games in Los.
See full article at The Wrap »

Alec Baldwin Talk Show Eyed at ABC

Alec Baldwin Talk Show Eyed at ABC
Get ready to hear lots of Alec Baldwin talking. (And not in that Donald Trump voice.)

The Emmy-winning actor is nearing a deal to host a talk show for ABC, according to The Hollywood Reporter. The untitled show would be based on Baldwin’s Wnyc radio show and podcast “Here’s the Thing With Alec Baldwin,” where he interviews celebrities and newsmakers like Barbra Streisand and Bernie Sanders.

VideosSNL‘s Trump Visited by Michael Flynn, Taunted by Hillary — ‘Lock Him Up!’

The deal for the ABC talk show isn’t officially done yet, but production is slated to get underway next week.
See full article at TVLine.com »
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