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Marvel Cinematic Universe: 10 performances that deserved Oscar nominations

Marvel Cinematic Universe: 10 performances that deserved Oscar nominations
Black Panther” is on track to be the first Marvel Cinematic Universe movie to contend in the top Oscar categories. It may well be the first film in the franchise to reap an acting bid. While that will be a worthy achievement, it is shocking that not a single performance from the first 20 films in the McU merited any attention from the acting branch of the academy.

With that in mind, let’s look back at 10 McU performances that deserved Oscar consideration but didn’t get any starting with Black Panther himself.

Chadwick Boseman as T’Challa/Black Panther in “Captain America: Civil War” (2016 – Best Supporting Actor)

Boseman arguably made more of an impact in “Civil War” than he did in his own solo film, “Black Panther.” Aside from being involved in some of the film’s best action sequences, Boseman carried the loss of T’Challa’s father throughout
See full article at Gold Derby »

In Memoriam 2018: Gallery of 30 celebrity deaths includes Penny Marshall, Stan Lee, Burt Reynolds, Aretha Franklin

In Memoriam 2018: Gallery of 30 celebrity deaths includes Penny Marshall, Stan Lee, Burt Reynolds, Aretha Franklin
With 2018 now ending, Gold Derby celebrates over 30 celebrities who died in the past 12 months. Tour our photo gallery above as we feature tributes to these entertainer losses from this past year.

Just a few of the people honored in our special photo gallery:

Actress and director Penny Marshall died December 17 at age 75. She became one of the biggest stars on TV in the 1970s and early 1980s with “Laverne and Shirley.” She then directed such blockbuster films as “Big,” “A League of Their Own” and “Awakenings.”

SEERaise a beer to Penny Marshall, who talked like a Bronx truck driver and directed mass-appeal films like a pro

Bernardo Bertolucci died on November 26 at age 77. His 1987 film “The Last Emperor” swept the Oscars, including for Best Picture and Best Director. Other movies in his career included “Last Tango in Paris,” “The Conformist,” “The Sheltering Sky” and “Little Buddha.”

Screenwriter William Goldman died
See full article at Gold Derby »

Marvel Cinema Universe: 5 performances that deserved Oscar nominations

Marvel Cinema Universe: 5 performances that deserved Oscar nominations
Black Panther” could well be the first Marvel Cinematic Universe movie to garner an acting nomination. While a laudable achievement, this also means that in the first 20 films in the franchise, not one cast member has merited attention from the academy.

Surely that’s ridiculous? Yes, fantasy and sci-fi films don’t typically register with the acting branch. The three films in “The Lord of The Rings” series, which received a combined total of 30 Academy Award nominations and 17 wins, only managed a singular acting bid – Best Supporting Actor for Ian McKellen as Gandalf the Grey. That trilogy featured a bunch of other outstanding performances from a brilliant cast (Andy Serkis as Gollum! Andy Serkis as Smeagol! Andy Serkis!).

What makes a performance in a superhero/fantasy film any less deserving of awards than a performance in a serious drama? Skill, technique and talent are used in both genres. With the
See full article at Gold Derby »

William Goldman, Oscar-winning screenwriter who put words in the mouths of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, dead at age 87

“Who are those guys?”

“Follow the money.”

“Is it safe?”

“Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die.”

These much-quoted lines are from such films as “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,” “All the President’s Men,” “Marathon Man” and “The Princess Bride.” But they were the creation of one man, William Goldman, an Oscar-winning screenwriter whose 1983 memoir, “Adventures in the Screen Trade,” is considered one of the best books about what it takes to make a living producing successful movie scripts.

Sadly, his flow of on-screen catchy dialogue has come to an end. Goldman, who once summed up the state of Hollywood creativity in just three words in his book – “Nobody knows anything” – is dead at age 87.

See An in memoriam gallery of 25 celebrities we said good-bye in 2018

He tried to write novels at first, and would do so eventually, but decided to try an original screenplay instead.
See full article at Gold Derby »

William Goldman, Legendary Screenwriter, Dead At Age 87

  • CinemaRetro
(Goldman with James Caan on the set of "A Bridge Too Far"- 1976)

By Lee Pfeiffer

There's an old joke among writers about the naive young starlet who thought she could make it in Hollywood by sleeping with screenwriters. Indeed, the people who made it possible for hit films to exist by writing the scenarios the actors carried out on screen were often regarded as being very low on the industry totem pole- and relatively low-paid as well. Not so with novelist and screenwriter William Goldman, who elevated regard for screenwriters while demanding- and receiving- the kind of breakthrough salaries that revolutionized the film industry's respect for writers. Goldman has died from cancer in Manhattan at age 87. He was known to be opinionated, abrasive and demanding, but no one questioned his talents. He won Oscars for "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" and "All the President's Men". Among his other
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Rip William Goldman: Robert Redford, Cary Elwes, Ben Stiller and More Pay Their Respects

  • The Wrap
Rip William Goldman: Robert Redford, Cary Elwes, Ben Stiller and More Pay Their Respects
Hollywood is paying their respects to Oscar-winning screenwriter and novelist William Goldman, who died Friday at age 87.

The influential writer behind “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,” “All the President’s Men” and the novel “The Princess Bride” left a mark on Hollywood’s crop of modern writers and directors, who today took to Twitter to celebrate his work and the impact he left on them.

“His book on screenwriting was a touchstone for me and I always felt starstruck seeing him at Knicks games,” actor and director Ben Stiller said in a tweet.

Also Read: William Goldman, Oscar-Winning Screenwriter for 'All the President's Men,' 'Butch Cassidy,' Dies at 87

“We had a long earlier history and I’m sorry to hear of his passing,” Robert Redford said in a quote to TheWrap.

“I was lucky as hell to count Bill as a mentor and a friend,” said Ron Howard in a tweet.
See full article at The Wrap »

William Goldman, ‘Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid’ Screenwriter, Dead at 87

William Goldman, ‘Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid’ Screenwriter, Dead at 87
William Goldman, the Oscar-winning screenwriter of All the President’s Men and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, died Thursday in Manhattan from complications from colon cancer and pneumonia. He was 87. His daughter Jenny Goldman confirmed the news to The Washington Post.

Goldman was born August 12th, 1931 in Highland Park, Illinois. He attended Ohio’s Oberlin College with the goal of becoming a writer, but he was unable to publish any work. After graduating in 1952, he entered the U.S. army and was discharged two years later; after graduating from New
See full article at Rolling Stone »

William Goldman, Oscar-Winning Screenwriter of ‘Butch Cassidy,’ Dead at 87

William Goldman, Oscar-Winning Screenwriter of ‘Butch Cassidy,’ Dead at 87
William Goldman, the screenwriter best known for penning “All the President’s Men” and “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,” has died at age 87. According to Deadline, Goldman’s health had been failing for sometime and he passed away surrounded by friends and family in his Manhattan home. Goldman started his career as a novelist before making the jump to screenwriter with the script for Basil Dearden’s 1965 comedy-thriller “Masquerade.”

“All The President’s Men” and “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” are widely considered to be Goldman’s greatest screenwriting achievements. “Butch Cassidy,” featuring the iconic pairing of Robert Redford and Paul Newman, won Goldman the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay at the 42nd Academy Awards. Goldman won over scripts for “Bonnie and Clyde” and “Two for the Road” that year. He earned his second Oscar for “All The President’s Men,” which won Best Adapted Screenplay at the
See full article at Indiewire »

William Goldman Has Died: Oscar-Winning Screenwriter Of ‘All The President’s Men’ Was 87

William Goldman Has Died: Oscar-Winning Screenwriter Of ‘All The President’s Men’ Was 87
Academy Award-winning screenwriter and acclaimed novelist William Goldman died last night at age 87.

Goldman is probably best known for his Oscar wins for his scripting of the films “All the President’s Men” and “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” However, those Robert Redford films only give the briefest of introductions to the incredible work done by this writer.

In addition to the aforementioned films, the writer also was responsible for scripts for films like “The Stepford Wives,” “Flowers for Algernon,” “Misery,” “Chaplin,” and “A Bridge Too Far,” among many more.

Continue reading William Goldman Has Died: Oscar-Winning Screenwriter Of ‘All The President’s Men’ Was 87 at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

'Princess Bride' Screenwriter William Goldman Dead at 87

  • TMZ
'Princess Bride' Screenwriter William Goldman Dead at 87
William Goldman -- the screenwriter who made tumbling down a hill romantic in the classic "The Princess Bride" -- has died. Goldman, who also won Oscars for writing "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" and "All the President's Men," died Thursday night in his Manhattan home following complications from colon cancer and pneumonia, this according to multiple outlets. He was surrounded by family and friends. Goldman's health had been deteriorating as of late but had worsened over the summer.
See full article at TMZ »

William Goldman, Oscar-Winning Screenwriter for ‘All the President’s Men,’ ‘Butch Cassidy,’ Dies at 87

  • The Wrap
William Goldman, Oscar-Winning Screenwriter for ‘All the President’s Men,’ ‘Butch Cassidy,’ Dies at 87
William Goldman, the author of the novel “The Princess Bride” and a two-time Oscar winner behind “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” and “All the President’s Men,” has died. He was 87.

His daughter, Jenny Goldman, told The Washington Post that he passed away in his home in Manhattanon Friday from complications from pneumonia and colon cancer.

Goldman was a legendary screenwriter and script doctor behind films such as “Marathon Men,” “Misery,” “Chaplin” and many more. He’s also an acclaimed novelist and playwright, and he’s even behind several iconic, non-fiction resources for contemporary writers, including “Adventures in Screen Trade” and “Which Lie Did I Tell?”

Also Read: How André the Giant Was Cast in 'The Princess Bride'

“Nobody knows anything,” Goldman wrote in “Adventures in Screen Trade.” “Not one person in the entire motion picture field knows for a certainty what’s going to work. Every
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Y: The Last Man’ Pilot Casts Diane Lane With Barry Keoghan Set as Yorick

  • Variety
FX’s “Y: The Last Man” pilot has set its main cast.

Diane Lane has signed on to star in the drama series pilot, which is simply titled “Y,” along with Barry Keoghan, Imogen Poots, Lashana Lynch, Juliana Canfield and Marin Ireland.

Based on DC Comics’ acclaimed series by Brian K. Vaughan and Pia Guerra, the project traverses a post-apocalyptic world in which a cataclysmic event has decimated every male mammal save for one lone human. The new world order of women will explore gender, race, class and survival.

Keoghan will play Yorick Brown, the main character from the graphic novels on which the show is based. He is described as a young man quick to use humor to deflect from his problems who may be the lone male survivor of a worldwide plague.

Keoghan is known for his roles in films like Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Killing of a Sacred Deer
See full article at Variety »

R.I.P. Anne V. Coates (1925 – 2018)

Legendary British film editor Anne V. Coates has passed away aged 92, with the British Academy of Film & Television Arts breaking the sad news on Twitter:

We're so sad to learn that British film editor Anne V. Coates has died. During her incredible career, Anne was BAFTA-nominated four times for work including The Elephant Man and Erin Brockovich, and received the BAFTA Fellowship in 2007. She will be greatly missed. pic.twitter.com/O2rrtBcs99

— BAFTA (@BAFTA) May 9, 2018

Coates began her career in the 1950s, and received an Academy Award for her work on David Lean’s 1962 classic Lawrence of Arabia, which included one of the most famous edits in film history – a shot of Peter O’Toole blowing out a match which quickly transitions to a majestic desert sunrise.

Coates would receive further Oscar nominations for Becket (1963), The Elephant Man (1980), In the Line of Fire (1993) and Out of Sight (1998), while
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Anne V. Coates Dies: Oscar-Winning ‘Lawrence Of Arabia’ Film Editor Was 92

Anne V. Coates Dies: Oscar-Winning ‘Lawrence Of Arabia’ Film Editor Was 92
British film editor Anne V. Coates, who won an Oscar for David Lean’s epic film Lawrence of Arabia, has died. She was 92.

BAFTA, which awarded her the organization’s highest honor, a BAFTA Fellowship, tweeted the news of her death. “We’re so sad to learn that British film editor Anne V. Coates has died” BAFTA wrote. “During her incredible career, Anne was BAFTA-nominated four times for work including ‘The Elephant Man’ and ‘Erin Brockovich,’ and received the BAFTA Fellowship in 2007. She will be greatly missed.”

Coates received five Best Film Editing Oscar nominations over the course of her career for Becket (1963), The Elephant Man (1980), In the Line of Fire (1993) and Out of Sight (1998) in addition to her nom and win for Lawrence of Arabia (1962). She also received an Academy Honorary Award, known as a Lifetime Achievement Oscar, in November 2016 by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
See full article at Deadline »

Anne V. Coates, Oscar-Winning Film Editor for ‘Lawrence of Arabia,’ Dies at 92

  • Variety
Anne V. Coates, Oscar-Winning Film Editor for ‘Lawrence of Arabia,’ Dies at 92
English-born film editor Anne V. Coates, who won an Academy Award for cutting David Lean’s classic “Lawrence of Arabia,” has died. She was 92.

She earned that 1963 Oscar: In addition to its impressive balance of imposing desert landscapes and vivid human drama (culled from some 31 miles of footage), the nearly four-hour epic contains one of the most famous “match” cuts in movie history, from a shot of Peter O’Toole blowing out a match to a majestic desert sunrise.

Coates went on to receive four more Academy Award nominations, for editing Peter Glenville’s “Becket” (1964), David Lynch’s “The Elephant Man” (1980), Wolfgang Petersen’s “In the Line of Fire” (1993) and Steven Soderbergh’s “Out of Sight” (1988).

Her other credits include “Young Cassidy” (1965), “The Bofors Gun” (1968), “The Public Eye” (1972), “Murder on the Orient Express” (1974), “What About Bob?” (1991), “Chaplin” (1992), “Congo” (1995), “Striptease” (1996) and Soderbergh’s “Erin Brockovich” (2000).

Her more recent credits include “The Golden Compass
See full article at Variety »

Robert Downey, Jr. movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Iron Man,’ ‘Tropic Thunder,’ ‘Chaplin,’ ‘Zodiac’

  • Gold Derby
Robert Downey, Jr. movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Iron Man,’ ‘Tropic Thunder,’ ‘Chaplin,’ ‘Zodiac’
Ten years after he first donned Iron Man’s suit of armor, Robert Downey Jr. has reprised his role as the billionaire superhero in the Marvel epic “Avengers: Infinity War.” The film finds the universe’s greatest heroes teaming up to stop the deadly Thanos (Josh Brolin) from gathering the infinity stones with the intention of wiping out half of the universe’s population. Downey Jr. first played the role in 2008’s “Iron Man,” and has appeared in eight subsequent Marvel movies. Of course, his career hasn’t been limited to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. So in honor of his latest big screen achievement, let’s take a look back on some of his best performances. Tour through our photo gallery above of Downey Jr.’s 20 greatest films, ranked from worst to best.

The son of underground filmmaker Robert Downey Sr. and actress Elsie Downey, Robert Downey Jr. made his
See full article at Gold Derby »

Robert Downey, Jr. Movies: 20 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Robert Downey, Jr. Movies: 20 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Ten years after he first donned Iron Man’s suit of armor, Robert Downey Jr. has reprised his role as the billionaire superhero in the Marvel epic “Avengers: Infinity War.” The film finds the universe’s greatest heroes teaming up to stop the deadly Thanos (Josh Brolin) from gathering the infinity stones with the intention of wiping out half of the universe’s population. Downey Jr. first played the role in 2008’s “Iron Man,” and has appeared in eight subsequent Marvel movies. Of course, his career hasn’t been limited to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. So in honor of his latest big screen achievement, let’s take a look back on some of his best performances. Tour through our photo gallery above of Downey Jr.’s 20 greatest films, ranked from worst to best.

The son of underground filmmaker Robert Downey Sr. and actress Elsie Downey, Robert Downey Jr. made his
See full article at Gold Derby »

Surrogacy drama 'Anchor And Hope' set for UK release via Network

Surrogacy drama 'Anchor And Hope' set for UK release via Network
Drama stars Game Of Thrones Oona Chaplin and Natalia Tena.

Anchor And Hope, the surrogacy drama from director Carlos Marques-Marcet, will get a UK theatrical release in July 20 via Network Releasing.

The film, which stars Game Of Thrones alumni Oona Chaplin and Natalia Tena with Verdaguer and Geraldine Chaplin, premiered at London Film Festival in October 2017, and has since screened at festivals including SXSW and Rotterdam.

The story follows the mid-30s pair of Eva (Chaplin) and Kat (Tena), whose carefree London life on a canal boat is disturbed by both the arrival of Roger (Verdaguer) and Kat’s realisation that she wants a child.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Downey Jr. Felt Like a Drowning Mouse

  • WENN
Former Hollywood badboy Robert Downey, Jr. has likened his struggle with alcohol and drug addiction to being a mouse drowning in a fish-tank. The Chaplin star is celebrating 12 months of sobriety after years of substance abuse, two stints in jail and a shattered public image, but will never forget the feeling of helplessness he experienced during his troubled years. He says, "So why can't I get out of my way? It's because you come to believe that it's a hopeless situation. It's like you take a mouse, and you put him in a fish-tank and fill it with water. The mouse swims to survive but sooner or later he gets tired and falls to the bottom. You do that 20 times, and eventually the mouse just falls straight to the bottom. He's thinking, 'To hell with it - I don't want to swim for 10 minutes, it doesn't matter, I'm falling anyway.' And that's what it's been like for me."

Downey Jr. Reveals Reason for Moving Wedding

  • WENN
Robert Downey, Jr claims he moved his wedding from the New York estate of Ron Perelman and Ellen Barkin at the last minute because the couple gave him "somewhat less" than their best wishes. The Chaplin star and producer Susan Levin were due to exchange nuptials at the billionaire couple's sprawling estate in the Hamptons on Saturday, but switched venues at the last minute, leading people to believe it was because the location had been exposed to the media. And while later reports suggested the move occurred because Perelman didn't want to release photographs of his estate, Downey insists the switch - along with Perelman and Barkin's absence - was rooted in something else. He tells Us TV show Extra!, "As for my disinvitation of Ron and Ellen... they wished us somewhat less than all the happiness in the world."
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