8.6/10
33,266
165 user 66 critic

Baraka (1992)

Not Rated | | Documentary | 19 November 1993 (USA)
A collection of expertly photographed scenes of human life and religion.

Director:

Ron Fricke

Writers:

Ron Fricke (concept), Mark Magidson (concept) | 7 more credits »
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2 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Storyline

Without words, cameras show us the world, with an emphasis not on "where," but on "what's there." It begins with morning, natural landscapes and people at prayer: volcanoes, water falls, veldts, and forests; several hundred Balinese Hindu men perform kecak, the monkey chant. Indigenous peoples apply body paint; whole villages dance. The film moves to destruction of nature via logging, blasting, and strip mining. Images of poverty, rapid urban life, and factories give way to war, concentration camps, and mass graves. Ancient ruins come into view, and then a sacred river where pilgrims bathe and funeral pyres burn. Prayer and nature return. A monk rings a huge bell; stars wheel across the sky. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A world beyond words.

Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

None

Release Date:

19 November 1993 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Baraka - Eine Welt jenseits der Worte See more »

Filming Locations:

Rajasthan, India See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$1,332,110
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Magidson Films See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)| Dolby SR (35 mm prints)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.20 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Director Ron Fricke invented a special time lapse camera just to make this film as he found the IMAX cameras too cumbersome. See more »

Goofs

The city Istanbul is misspelled in the movie twice, as Instanbul. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Master (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Wandering Saint
from Expressions of Impressions
Performed and Composed by L. Subramaniam
Courtesy of Sonic Atmospheres and Sonic Edge Records
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Transcendant
24 September 1999 | by tritisanSee all my reviews

To do describe this work of art simply as a "movie" would be inaccurate and unjustified. More akin to a tone poem Baraka is.

Is this what the world would look like to a god, a being who experiences time differently than we do?

While Koyaanisqatsi effectively drilled its message, "Humans are destroying the planet!", into our hypnotized minds, Baraka lets you ponder and meditate its multiple meanings. Are humans just another part of the ecosystem, behaving as any other organism would with our capabilities? Or are we different, even alien, to this world?

10 out of 10.


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