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Thelma & Louise (1991)

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Two best friends set out on an adventure, but it soon turns around to a terrifying escape from being hunted by the police, as these two girls escape for the crimes they committed.

Director:

Ridley Scott

Writer:

Callie Khouri
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Popularity
2,072 ( 266)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 22 wins & 48 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Susan Sarandon ... Louise
Geena Davis ... Thelma
Harvey Keitel ... Hal
Michael Madsen ... Jimmy
Christopher McDonald ... Darryl
Stephen Tobolowsky ... Max
Brad Pitt ... J.D.
Timothy Carhart ... Harlan
Lucinda Jenney ... Lena, the Waitress
Jason Beghe ... State Trooper
Sonny Carl Davis ... Albert
Shelly Desai ... East Indian Motel Clerk (as Shelly De Sai)
Ken Swofford ... Major
Carol Mansell ... Waitress
Stephen Polk ... Surveillance Man
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Storyline

Louise is working in a diner as a waitress and has some problems with her boyfriend Jimmy, who, as a musician, is always on the road. Thelma is married to Darryl who likes his wife to stay quiet in the kitchen so that he can watch football on TV. One day they decide to break out of their normal life and jump in the car and hit the road. Their journey, however, turns into a flight when Louise kills a man who threatens to rape Thelma. They decide to go to Mexico, but soon they are hunted by American police. Written by Harald Mayr <marvin@bike.augusta.de>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Somebody said get a life... so they did.

Genres:

Adventure | Crime | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language, and for some violence and sensuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA | UK | France

Language:

English

Release Date:

24 May 1991 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Thelma and Louise See more »

Filming Locations:

Derby Acres, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$16,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,101,297, 27 May 1991, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$45,361,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Initially committed to produce, Ridley Scott did not think he should direct. Among the directors he sounded out for the project were his brother, Tony Scott, Joe Pytka, Jeremiah S. Chechik, Chris Menges, Kevin Reynolds, Jonathan Kaplan, Phillip Noyce, Harry Hook, and Bob Rafelson. Richard Donner was keen to shoot the film - he called the script "historic" - but wanted his wife, Lauren Shuler Donner to produce, but Scott was not enthusiastic about that. See more »

Goofs

The lights are reflected off Louise's sunglasses as she and Thelma are waiting for the train to pass. See more »

Quotes

Louise: Yeah, where do you get off behaving like that with women you don't even know? Huh? Huh? How'd you feel if someone did that to your mother? Or your sister? Or your wife?
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Connections

Referenced in Sordid Lives (2000) See more »

Soundtracks

Part Of Me, Part Of You
Written by Glenn Frey & Jack Tempchin
Performed by Glenn Frey
Produced by Don Was
Co-Produced by Elliot Scheiner
Courtesy of MCA Records
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
More than an exercise in male-bashing
8 June 2002 | by DeeNine-2See all my reviews

This is an important commercial film aimed at blue collar women who feel victimized by both society and the men in their lives. Directed by Ridley Scott, who directed the science fiction classics, Alien (1979) and Blade Runner (1982), Thelma and Louise is an on-the-lam chick flick (with chase scenes), a kind of femme Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), somewhat akin to Wild at Heart (1990) and Natural Born Killers (1994) but without the gratuitous violence of those films. Ridley Scott walks the razor edge between femme-exploitation and serious social commentary. Incidentally, the script is by Callie Khouri who wrote Something to Talk About (1995) and Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood (2002) which should give you an idea of how men are depicted here.

Susan Sarandon is Louise, a thirty-something Arkansas waitress with an attitude and some emotional baggage, and Geena Davis is Thelma, a cloistered ingenue housewife with a yearning to breath free. Both do an outstanding job and carry the film from beginning to end. The characters they play are well-rounded and fully developed and sympathetic, in contrast to the men in the film who are for the most part merely clichés, or in the case of Darryl (Christopher McDonald), Thelma's boorish husband, or the troll-like truck driver, burlesques.

I have never seen Geena Davis better. Her unique style is melded very well into a naive woman who never had a chance to express herself, but goes hog wild and seems a natural at it when the time comes. Sarandon is also at the top of her game and plays the crusty, worldly wise, vulnerable Louise with tenderness and understanding. Note, by the way, her pinned up in back hair-style, directly lifted from TV's Polly Holliday ("Kiss my grits!") who appeared as a waitress in the seventies sitcoms "Alice" and "Flo."

Harvey Keitel plays the almost sympathetic cop, Hal Slocumb, and Brad Pitt appears as J. D., a sweet-talking twenty-something who gives Thelma the script for robbing 7-11s as he steals more than her libido.

This movie works because it is funny and sad by turns and expresses the yearning we all have to be free of the restraints of society and its institutions (symbolized in the wide-open spaces of the American Southwest) while representing the on again, off again incompatibility of the male and female heart. The male-bashing is done with a touch of humor and the targets are richly deserving of what they get. The ending is perhaps too theatrical and frankly unrealistic, but opinions may differ.

Best and most telling quick scene is when Thelma phones Darryl to see if he has found out about their escapades. Weasel-like, he is trying to help the cops locate them, but he is so transparent to her that all she has to do is hear his voice. "He knows," she says to Louise and hangs up.

Best visual is when the black police helicopter appears suddenly, menacingly like a giant fly beneath the horizon of the Grand Canyon. Also excellent were the all those squad cars lined up like armored battalions aimed at the girls on the run.

I also liked the scenes at the motel with J.D. and Louise's boyfriend. They were beautifully directed and cut, and very well conveyed by Sarandon and Davis, depicting two contrasting stages in male-female relationships.

See this for Geena Davis because she was brilliant, vividly alive and never looked better.


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