5.4/10
7
1 user

L'amour maudit de Leisenbohg (1991)

The 35-year-old ministry official Baron Leisenbohg had the stage career ten years ago as the cast of the "Queen of the Night", opera that promoted singer Klare Hell. Klare shows no gratitude however.

Director:

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
... Le baron de Leisenbohg
... Claire Hell
... Sabine
... Fanny
... Le duc Richard
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Manfred Andrae ... Feuerstein
Lena Birková ... L'infirmière au sanatorium
Mária Dolanská ... Alma Mahler (as Marie Dolanska)
Rudolph Fleischer ... Edgar (as Rudolf Fleischer)
Marie Hruba ... La femme blonde
Leos Kaltofen ... L'arbitre
Bohumil Koska ... Le bagagiste du Bristol
Ladislav Krecmer ... Le directeur de l'opéra
Eliska Kucharová ... La dame du Prater
Edit

Storyline

The 35-year-old ministry official Baron Leisenbohg had the stage career ten years ago as the cast of the "Queen of the Night", opera that promoted singer Klare Hell. Klare shows no gratitude however.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Edit

Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

30 March 1991 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Das Schicksal des Freiherrn von Leisenbohg  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Original literary source: "Das Schicksal des Freiherrn von Leisenbohg", short story by Arthur Schnitzler, S. Fischer Verlag GmbH publishers, 1907. See more »

Soundtracks

L'Enlèvement au sérail
Composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conducted by Heinz Wallberg
Sung by Edita Gruberova as Constance
(BMG Ariola Munchen GmbH)
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
It's hard to get to the very soul of Schnitzler...
19 March 2002 | by See all my reviews

Like the most recent example of bringing Arthur Schnitzler to the screen, "Eyes wide shut" this movie suffers from the fact that the sort of imaginations that run through your mind while reading a Schnitzler story cannot be put adequately into a movie, even not in an x-rated one. See, even Max Ophuels' version of "Reigen" caused a scandal, although he didn't show or imply anything. The naughtiness of Schnitzler's work lies in the fact that mankind is utterly confronted with his most dark, most hidden desires. But before starting a lecture, I should get to the movie.

The story tells of a wealthy gentleman being hopelessly in love with an opera singer. Finally, he achieves her affection, but finds out that he has got a horrible price to pay. I think it's quite well done, the acting is excellent, so are the sets and even the newly made up stuff like the seance or the literally "blue-eyed" Siegfried-Character match with the original idea, although the latter is a figure that only makes sense after the third reich - but Schnitzler's story was already written in 1903. The best part of the movie is that it maintains the ambiguity of the literary source, becoming a more "fantastic" movie than most of the other entries in the genre.


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See one user review »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Action and Adventure Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular action and adventure titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial