An F.B.I. Agent goes undercover to catch a gang of surfers who may be bank robbers.

Director:

Kathryn Bigelow

Writers:

Rick King (story), W. Peter Iliff (story) | 1 more credit »
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Popularity
661 ( 114)
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Patrick Swayze ... Bodhi
Keanu Reeves ... Johnny Utah
Gary Busey ... Pappas
Lori Petty ... Tyler
John C. McGinley ... Ben Harp (as John McGinley)
James Le Gros ... Roach
John Philbin ... Nathanial
Bojesse Christopher ... Grommet
Julian Reyes Julian Reyes ... Alvarez
Daniel Beer ... Babbit
Chris Pedersen ... Bunker
Vincent Klyn Vincent Klyn ... Warchild
Anthony Kiedis ... Tone
Dave Olson Dave Olson ... Archbold
Lee Tergesen ... Rosie
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Storyline

In Los Angeles, California, a gang of bank robbers call themselves The Ex-Presidents. commit their crimes while wearing masks of ex-Presidents Reagan, Carter, Nixon, and Johnson. The F.B.I. believes that the members of the gang could be surfers, and send young Agent Johnny Utah undercover at the beach to mix with the surfers and gather information. Utah meets surfer Bodhi, and gets drawn into the lifestyle of his new friend. Written by Sami Al-Taher <staher2000@yahoo.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Point Break: 100% Pure Adrenaline! See more »

Genres:

Action | Crime | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence, language and brief nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film's script shares many similarities with The Fast and The Furious: a young police officer is sent undercover to identify a criminal gang carrying out hold ups; he has to infiltrate a world of extreme sport; he integrates himself into a group who ultimately turned out to be the criminals (falling for one of their associates along the way) and ultimately ends up letting the gang leader escape. See more »

Goofs

At the beginning of the film, Pappas says the Ex Presidents have robbed 27 banks in 3 years. Later as Harp is yelling at Utah and Pappas about their undercover work, he says the Presidents have robbed two more, which would make it 29. Yet when they analyze the hair, Pappas says there have been 28 robberies. One of these two robberies was the 28th, when the hair was obtained. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Shooting Instructor: [Agent Utah finishes his gun range test] 100%, Utah. Good job!
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Alternate Versions

The scene when the raid on the house occurs, an FBI is stabbed in the back by a naked woman and she ran around a little more. This scene was cut down to show her only stabbing the FBI agent for television releases. See more »


Soundtracks

Nobody Rides for Free
Performed by Ratt
Written by Steve Caton
Produced by Mick Guzauski with Ratt
Courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corporation, a Time-Warner Company
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User Reviews

 
The film for an adrenaline generation
14 October 2004 | by rhino-25See all my reviews

Thirteen years on it sounds a little trite - an FBI agent examines his inner self whilst trying to bring down a gang of surfer bank robbers by infiltrating their scene. But dude, how Point Break pulled this off!

In what can now safely be regarded as one of the more generation-defining cinematic moments of the nineties, Point Break serves as not just a credible well-paced action thriller spectacle, but also as a voice for advocates of the adrenalin rush. The movie's sleeper popularity at the time would no doubt have helped issue in a new generation of 'X' sports for a new generation, as hungry sponsors leapt at a new market.

Kathryn Bigelow takes some key pointers from then hubby James Cameron and paces the movie brilliantly. There are many key moments of unique action - that chute-less jump from 4,000 feet being the highlight - that filled the trailer, but it is the cumulative effect of bringing these moments together that adds to the picture. For so many films the denouement is a gross failure but Bigelow controls the films peaks and troughs expertly and the ending is genuinely well handled, something that appears to be a real struggle for Hollywood today.

In what will go down as Patrick Swayze's finest moment on film, he plays the adrenalin guru Bodhi with glaze-eyed and silver tongued expertise, and manages to pull off the very difficult assignment of being both sane and insane simultaneously with accomplishment.

You can almost feel pulled by Bodhi's enthusiasm for a sensation 'as close as you get to God', and as a result can excuse the decade for being labeled that of the 'slacker' generation. The nineties weren't about slacking, just looking for a different kind of high.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA | Japan

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 July 1991 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Johnny Utah See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$24,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$8,514,616, 14 July 1991

Gross USA:

$43,218,387

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$83,531,958
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)| Dolby SR (35 mm prints)| DTS (5.1)

Color:

Color (Deluxe)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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